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   Microcap & Penny StocksDD Central on ECNC (formerly BETT)


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:18:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: ComVest Research (88 )
From: Popiye Thursday, May 21 1998 5:41PM ET
Reply # of 2300

Mr Thomas S. Hughs is the Founder of ET & T and of Betting Inc.
I do not have a breakdown of Mr. Hugh's business background.




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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:20:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: Popiye (105 )
From: Micropicker Tuesday, Jun 2 1998 1:09PM ET
Reply # of 2300

BETT does have competition (sorta, kinda).

BETT does have some competition, including WINR, GLOW, etc.. What makes BETT attractive to me is the placement of the Shop While You Wait terminals, which lowers BETT's overhead. BETT's system can also be used for other secure cash transactions--the business plan is quite impressive. One of the reasons BETT can say they have no competition is that the way they handle the transactions is unique. I feel it is a better way than the competition and will ultimately prevail over that competition. I can't wait until the "positive" news hits.


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:30:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: ComVest Research (164 )
From: Prosperous Soul Saturday, Jun 13 1998 10:10PM ET
Reply # of 2300

DOJ: Gaming bill too broad

By Dan Goodin
Staff Writer, CNET NEWS.COM
June 12, 1998, 5:45 p.m. PT

A bill pending in the Senate that would prohibit Net
gambling is inconsistent, overly broad, and subject
to constitutional and other legal challenges, an
attorney for the Justice Department said.

The comments, made in a letter sent at the request
of Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), are the latest
criticism of the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act,
sponsored by Sen. Jon Kyl (R-Arizona). Kyl has
said bill is needed so that existing gambling
laws--which prohibit the transmission of interstate
bets via wire communications--can keep pace with
the growing use of the Internet.

But critics have charged that the bill goes well
beyond that, carving out prohibitions that would be
singular to Internet gamblers. The Justice
Department's letter, authored by assistant attorney
general L. Anthony Sutin, agreed.

"If this legislation were to be enacted, the federal
criminal law would significantly differ in the way it
treats two individuals who place identical wagers
with the same recipient, depending on what method
of transmission the bettors use," Sutin stated.
"Legislation should, absent some articulable reason,
treat physical activity and cyberactivity in the same
way."

Specifically, Sutin wrote, Kyl's bill would apply to
any person using the Internet or other interactive
devices to take or place wagers. Existing laws
apply only to people "in the business of betting or
wagering." As a result, people who engaged in
so-called fantasy football or office pools might be
guilty of federal offenses under the new law,
according to Sutin.

The assistant attorney general went on to criticize
other provisions in the bill that he said would create
problems, including one calling on the president to
encourage foreign countries to police their
jurisdictions for violations of the law.

"If we request that foreign countries investigate, on
our behalf, conduct that is legal in the foreign state,
we must be prepared to receive and act upon
foreign requests for assistance when the conduct
complained of is legal, or even constitutionally
protected, in the United States," Sutin explained.

He also challenged as potentially unconstitutional
some "vague" language in the bill that could be
"construed to apply to persons who do not have
the intent to participate in or assist illegal gambling
transactions."

Critics of Internet gambling prohibition immediately
hailed Sutin's letter as vindication for their position.

"It's a very detailed analysis that not only points out
all the flaws in the specific legislation but bolsters
our argument, which is to come up with a
regulatory scheme," said Sue Schneider, editor of
Rolling Good Times Online, an online gambling
magazine. She pointed to legislation Australia
recently enacted that places strict regulatory
oversight on Internet gambling, rather than banning
it outright.

Kyl's office issued a statement that promised to
"examine" Sutin's comments "to see if they are
constructive." The bill already has been modified to
allow online horse betting and state lotteries. The
statement did not say whether the senator was
open to further changes.

"The Justice Department appears to agree with the
goal of and need for the legislation," the statement
noted. "In addition, the department admits that 'the
Internet may have diminished' the effectiveness of
current gambling statutes and that it supports
'amending the federal gambling statutes.'"




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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:34:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: ComVest Research (164 )
From: Popiye Saturday, Jun 13 1998 10:11PM ET
Reply # of 2300

Having been in the computer industry and information industry for more years (24) then 98% of the on-line public today and having the opportunity to academically study and teach the subjects of new technology; there are those that were also against the teletype, telephone, radio, television, and the computer, etc..

Today, with everything, their is a computer chip running it. More importantly - probably - politicians are trying to tax interstate commerce via communication media. We beat them with the internet due to explosive of growth.

(NOTE: IT'S OKAY TO SEND AND PAY OUR TAXES DOLLARS VIA THE INTERNET TO THE IRS - DAH?)

Encryption is safe and security is pissing off the NSA, CIA, FBI and foreign foes. Because, we consumers have encryption software (128 bit) that would take A Cray computer 15 years to decipher a love note. Big brother wants to meddle in our affairs.

There is the moral issue. Gambling. Well - from the start, the first American revolutionary Army we had against the British was money gathered by a lottery by the colonists. Gee, they like to change the history books about the truth. So - for me, the moral issue is who wants to throw the first rock.

Then we have the ones that do not like the computer and information systems industry because it will take away the jobs. Blah - Blah - Not true. To them, go back to school and learn. Education is a life long process or park cars for a living.

The best... BETT business plan is NOTvia the WWW Internet format or protocols that we are using with Microsoft Windows Software. - They plan to use different hardware on the same circuits which is the same we use for Banking ATMs circuits..

So, think back when we go the the local grocery store and purchase a lottery ticket. How does our tickets get to Loto headquarters? .......... via computer communications circuits. Now it's okay for the government to do it - but not the private sector? Hope the picture is clearer.

I would like to play my lottery on Saturday night from home. I also would like to bet a fight, football game, baseball game, a lottery in a different state, horses, dogs, frogs and chickens. Actually I bet only the lottery - (and pennies) but the market share is there. Also how about betting Irish and Italian lottery once a year worth millions. What is the difference if we use a stamp or a communication's circuit. Only the delivery media. Before it was by foot, then horse and carriage, train, airplane, and now communication's circuits.

If anyone has the opportunity, please read the "Digial Economy", it can be picked up at your local library for free. The whole world is changing to a communication's world of information. The older politicians will be gone and the new thinkers will be in. Just a matter of time - and they can not stop it.

Another point about BETT, how about buying anything at home via a communication's circuit with one of BETT's devices. Same one you use when you use your credit card at a department store. The communications circuit. Do not let anybody blow smoke.
Additionally what makes BETT different is the encryption with ET & T and with Unicom that are business partners.

I feel better.. LOL. Tomorrow the surf will be up and I will be surfing with my boys on da beach. Best wishes:)



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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:36:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: ComVest Research (164 )
From: hammer Sunday, Jun 14 1998 8:41AM ET
Reply # of 2300

Bill - the whole concept of internet gambling/wagering is still unregulated and open to many interpretations about U.S. legality. You can find many articles arguing both sides of the issue but it seems to me that the ultimate outcome will be a tightly defined internet gaming association with self regulating rules. Example - restricted use, must have cash in bank (ATM style Pay Master like BETTS for access), membership sign on with plenty of written warnings and disclaimers, etc.

Remember that for now BETT is not involved in the gaming itself, just the ATM style pay machines for sports accounts.

As the U.S. defines it's opinion other countries are accepting online gambling and there are big opportunities. Posted below is an article you may find interesting - it points out the risks as well as the potential rewards. (sounds like pennie stocks) I think the article balances both perspectives well but clearly points out the current U.S. hesitancy.

**********************************************************************

msnbc.com

Risky bottom line
for cyber casinos

You could make a fortune, but lotto might be better play

By Barton Crockett
MSNBC

You might as well buy a lotto ticket. That's probably the best answer to the question:
Can you make money running an online gambling site?

'There is no way (major U.S. casinos) would take the risk with online gambling.'
- KATHLEEN SCHIPPERS
American Gaming Association spokeswoman THE REASON? Legal questions make this a long-shot business at best. But the economics show a jackpot could be waiting for some lucky sharpie able to beat the casino cops. Such odds have convinced dozens to take the chance. Newsletter Rolling Good Times Online, which covers gaming, counts 32 Web sites that handle wagering with real money, according to editor Sue Schneider, who also is head of industry group the Interactive Gaming Council.
Web site www.gambling.com lists 20 Web casino and game sites that take real money, and there are more than three dozen entries in the online casino category in the Yahoo search engine. Who's operating these sites? First, understand who isn't - big U.S. casinos. "There is no way they would take the risk with online gambling," said Kathleen Schippers, communications director for the American Gaming Association, an industry trade group. Because of the legal uncertainties, they would risk losing their casino licenses by participating in online gambling, she explained. Who does that leave? An odd-lot of gamesters that aren't exactly household names. Among them - the government of Liechtenstein, a 62-square-mile country sandwiched between Austria and Switzerland. Through a state-sanctioned charitable foundation, Liechtenstein started selling lottery tickets online in August 1995. In April of this year, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies became a sponsor for the games, which are being moved from the old InterLotto Web site to the new PlusLotto site. The federation is to receive 25 percent of all wagers. Right now the lottery is generating only about $68,000 in sales per week. But the Red Cross federation's director of revenue generation, Dwight Mihalicz, said wagers are expected to reach about $3.4 million a week by the spring of 1998, and give the federation a valuable new source of revenue. Bettors from Finnish, Austrian, and Swiss Internet addresses aren't allowed to play because of legal restrictions. Elsewhere, Mihalicz said, local Red Cross societies and citizens must decide for themselves if it's legal to promote the lotto or play in it. (The U.S. Red Cross isn't promoting the game.) Other government-sanctioned gambling operations include two games licensed by the government of Gibraltar - InterKeno and BingoExpress - both of which donate a portion of their proceeds to the New World Foundation charity.

Another site you could put in the government-run category is the U.S. Lottery, launched this year by the Coeur d'Alene Indians in Idaho. This site is embroiled in the debate over the legality of online gaming in the United States. On May 28, the attorney general in Missouri filed suit against the tribe, and the Milford, Conn.-based telecommunications company operating the site, Executone Information Systems Inc., contending that the lottery violates Missouri law. The tribe and Executone, which had revenues of $184 million in 1996, say their site is legal. Indian tribes also are behind MegaBingo, played simultaneously via closed-circuit television on 50 Indian reservations. Through the Web, you can sign up to have someone play for you, then find out how your proxy did by e-mail. The Web site and the television link is run by Tulsa, Okla.-based Multimedia Games Inc. Finland also offers its citizens Web access to its national lottery.

SMALL COMPANIES DOMINATE THE FIELD
Otherwise, the Internet gambling field is dominated by small companies running Web casinos and sports books out of places like Dominica, the Cook Islands, Antigua and Grenada, where the legal environment is more hospitable than in the United States. It is difficult to say with any certainty how much is being wagered online. One company, Interactive Gaming and Communications Corp., of Blue Bell, Pa., has issued financial statements showing total wagers of $17.9 million for the three months ending in March, net revenue from bettor losses and membership fees of $675,000, and a net loss to the company of $184,000.

Based on what he knows of Lichtenstein and IGC, Whittier Law School professor and online gambling expert I. Nelson Rose estimates that the current level of online wagering is less than $300 million per year, although he says the rate of wagering could rise to $500 million by year's end. That's a minuscule portion of the $586 billion wagered in the United States in 1996, according to gambling consultancy Christansen/Cummings Associates Inc., in New York.

But there's potential for the Web cut to grow. Sebastian Sinclair, a free-lance researcher for gambling consultant Christiansen/Cummings, has projected that Web casinos could generate up to $8.7 billion of revenue from gambling losses by 2000, while pari-mutuel betting could take in $490 million and sports betting $760 million. Sinclair acknowledges that these projections are a "complete shot in the dark," based on the unsubstantiated assumption that Web surfers will endure about a third of their total casino gambling losses online, and all of their pari-mutuel and sports betting losses. But other experts agree that Net wagers will grow, along with other forms of electronic commerce. And those revenues could have a fat-bottom line, since cyber casinos don't have to spend billions on the trappings of physical casinos, like free drinks, dance girls and hotels that look like pyramids or sphinxes. How fat? United Casino Corp., an over-the-counter listed Web casino company operating from Irvine, Calif., gave a notable perspective in a self-published "researchreport" distributed to stock brokers in January.In the paper, the company estimated that the Cook Islands-based Web casino it "advises" has the potential to generate revenue of $103.7 million per year. This assumes that the Casinos of the South Pacific gets just 0.2 percent to 0.5 percent of wagers by Web surfers in Europe and Asia. United Casino estimated that that the Cook Island-based casino's operating and equipment costs would total $37 million, leaving it with more than $66 million in net income and a profit margin of 64 percent. United Casinos owns stakes in two companies entitled to most of the Casinos of the South Pacific's earnings. This complicated ownership structure gives United Casino rights to 42 percent of Casinos of the South Pacific's profits, according to the report. Of course, the Casinos of the South Pacific is only in test mode, and currently isn't getting significant revenue, said United Casino Chief Financial Officer James Brewer. Brewer explained the company's operations in a May 23 interview with MSNBC Business Video. But, hey, United Casino is a stock you can buy, under the ticker "UCNO." And it's not the only one. IGC also is listed, as are in-development Web casino companies Playstar Corp., a Delaware-registered company operating from Toronto, and VentureTech Inc., of Reston, Va. Another Web casino in the making, World Wide Web Casinos of Santa Ana, Calif., plans to go public soon through a reverse merger. Christansen/Cummings Associates Inc., in New York.

But there's potential for the Web cut to grow. Sebastian Sinclair, a free-lance researcher for gambling consultant Christiansen/Cummings, has projected that Web casinos could generate up to $8.7 billion of revenue from gambling losses by 2000, while pari-mutuel betting could take in $490 million and sports betting $760 million. Sinclair acknowledges that these projections are a "complete shot in the dark,"
based on the unsubstantiated assumption that Web surfers will endure about a third of their total casino gambling losses online, and all of their pari-mutuel and sports betting losses. But other experts agree that Net wagers will grow, along with other forms of electronic commerce. And those revenues could have a fat-bottom line, since cyber casinos don't have to spend billions on the trappings of physical casinos, like free drinks, dance girls and hotels that look like pyramids or sphinxes. How fat? United Casino Corp., over-the-counter listed Web casino company operating from Irvine, Calif., gave a notable perspective in a self-published "research report" distributed to stock brokers in January. In the paper, the company estimated that the Cook Islands-based Web casino it "advises" has the potential to generate revenue of $103.7 million per year. This assumes that the Casinos of the South Pacific gets just 0.2 percent to 0.5 percent of wagers by Web surfers in Europe and Asia. United Casino estimated that that the Cook Island-based casino's operating and equipment costs would total $37 million, leaving it with more than $66 million in net income and a profit margin of 64 percent. United Casinos owns stakes in two companies entitled to most of the Casinos of the South Pacific's earnings. This complicated ownership structure gives United Casino rights to 42 percent of Casinos of the South Pacific's profits, according to the report. Of course, the Casinos of the South Pacific is only in test mode, and currently isn't getting significant revenue, said United Casino Chief Financial Officer James Brewer. Brewer explained the company's operations in a May 23 interview with MSNBC Business Video. But, hey, United Casino is a stock you can buy, under the ticker "UCNO." And it's not the only one. IGC also is listed, as are in-development Web casino companies Playstar Corp., a Delaware-registered company operating from Toronto, and VentureTech Inc., of Reston, Va. Another Web casino in the making, World Wide Web Casinos of Santa Ana, Calif., plans to go public soon through a reverse merger.

**********************************************************************
Again - I don't want this article to appear as a negative - just wanted to point out a couple perspectives. I think the article is positive and I don't see the U.S. being able to regulate internet gambling - if internet gambling can't be done on U.S. soil it can be easily accessed in other countries.

BETT is not focusing on internet gaming, their recent press releases focus on another huge industry - sports wagering. BETT's ATM style Pay Master - it simply allows current sports betters to replenish their accounts from home. (March 26th P.R.)

Having said that - I would not be surprised to hear of BETT's Paymaster as having online gambling potential in the future.


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:39:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: Popiye (166 )
From: Prosperous Soul Monday, Jun 15 1998 9:52AM ET
Reply # of 2300

Newcom Technologies Pty. Ltd., Australia, and Betting Inc./Electronic
Transactions and Technologies, USA, to Demonstrate Secure Pay/Play
Wager With a GSM Mobile Phone from England to Australia

LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--June 15, 1998--Agreement struck to demonstrate first real time GSM (Global System for Mobiles) cash pay- per-play smart card international wagering from England to Australia.

Newcom Technologies of Australia, and Electronic Transactions and Technologies and Betting Inc. (OTC/BB:BETT - news), of the United States, have negotiated an agreement to demonstrate a secure pay-per-play wager with a GSM phone, calling from England to place a $100 card- authenticated bet in Australia.

At the Mobile Commerce '98 Conference held in London on June 23 and 24, ET&T and Betting Inc., using the Newcom Platform, will pass a GSM SMS (short message service) message to the ET&T bank host server detailing a $100 smart-card bet.

The ET&T server will then pass the message and payment-complete command to Betting Inc., which will use the Internet to carry the encrypted SMS message to the waiting gaming operator in Australia. The operator in turn will acknowledge placement of such wager to Betting Inc. which will inform ET&T. ET&T will then command a nearby fax machine to print a receipt.

The phone being used will emulate the Pocket Pay which ET&T will be developing and which will act as a pocket-sized terminal for financial cards of any type such as ATM cards or smart cards, and may also be used as a regular voice phone.

''The agreement brings a complete package to potential gaming partners of ET&T and Betting Inc. in various countries. It uses either ET&T's patented Pocket Pay equipment or a commerce-enabled mobile phone,'' said Tom Hughes, chief executive officer of ET&T and Betting Inc.

''The Newcom phone solution which interfaces with gaming operators through ET&T and Betting Inc. demonstrates the deliverability of a product that is market ready today,'' stated Keith Benson, CEO of Newcom.

Newcom Technologies Pty. Ltd. has developed an open platform for use on any Phase 2+ GSM mobile telephone to allow secure electronic commerce and card-service functionality. Newcom's Web site is located at newcom.com.au.

Betting Inc. is focused on interfacing between bank host processing centers receiving such electronic cash payments and the gaming operators. ET&T is a developer of new types of terminals to originate such transactions and is focused as the bank host processing center to process such transactions. The company's Web site is located at www.hpos.com.

Contact:

Carnegie Cooke & Company Inc.
Anita Goldberg, 800/262-2331


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:43:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: Prosperous Soul (173 )
From: Prosperous Soul Wednesday, Jun 17 1998 12:12PM ET
Reply # of 2300

Estimated $100 Billion Cash Pay-Per-Play Global Wagering Market to Be
Opened by Betting Inc.

Routing First-Time, International Pay-Per-Play $100 Smart Card Global Mobile Satellite Phone Cash Wager From London to Australian Gaming Operator

LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--June 17, 1998-- Agreement struck to demonstrate first real time GSM (Global System for Mobiles) cash pay-per-play smart card international wagering from England to Australia.

Newcom Technologies of Australia, and Electronic Transactions and Technologies and Betting Inc. (OTC/BB:BETT), of the United States, have negotiated an agreement to demonstrate a secure pay-per-play wager with a GSM phone, calling from England to place a $100 card- authenticated bet in Australia.

At the Mobile Commerce '98 Conference held in London on June 23 and 24, ET&T and Betting Inc., using the Newcom Platform, will pass a GSM SMS (short message service) message to the ET&T bank host server detailing a $100 smart-card bet.

The ET&T server will then pass the message and payment-complete command to Betting Inc., which will use the Internet to carry the encrypted SMS message to the waiting gaming operator in Australia. The operator in turn will acknowledge placement of such wager to Betting Inc. which will inform ET&T. ET&T will then command a nearby fax machine to print a receipt.

The phone being used will emulate the Pocket Pay which ET&T will be developing and which will act as a pocket-sized terminal for financial cards of any type such as ATM cards or smart cards, and may also be used as a regular voice phone.

''The agreement brings a complete package to potential gaming partners of ET&T and Betting Inc. in various countries. It uses either ET&T's patented Pocket Pay equipment or a commerce-enabled mobile phone,'' said Tom Hughes, chief executive officer of ET&T and Betting Inc.

''The Newcom phone solution which interfaces with gaming operators through ET&T and Betting Inc. demonstrates the deliverability of a product that is market ready today,'' stated Keith Benson, CEO of Newcom.

Newcom Technologies Pty. Ltd. has developed an open platform for use on any Phase 2+ GSM mobile telephone to allow secure electronic commerce and card-service functionality. Newcom's Web site is located at newcom.com.au.

Betting Inc. is focused on interfacing between bank host processing centers receiving such electronic cash payments and the gaming operators. ET&T is a developer of new types of terminals to originate such transactions and is focused as the bank host processing center to process such transactions. The company's Web site is located at www.hpos.com.

Contact:

Carnegie Cooke & Company Inc.
Anita Goldberg, 800/262-2331


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:44:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: GC (184 )
From: Popiye Wednesday, Jun 17 1998 1:25PM ET
Reply # of 2300

GC: Tom Hughes (BET) purchased the shell "Leggons" and paid off all creditors last year. Leggons at one time made it to $ 3.00 a share. Totally different man, management, and business plan.. Best wishes:)


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:46:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: Dan Meckenstock (190 )
From: Dan Meckenstock Thursday, Jun 18 1998 6:50PM ET
Reply # of 2300

Betting Inc. Defines its Mission
biz.yahoo.com

For the Record...

LAS VEGAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--June 18, 1998--The business of Betting Inc. [OTC BB:BETT - news] is to facilitate PERFECT wagering transactions between the players and the gaming operators.

A PERFECT wager is a personal encrypted transaction that is originating from a remote site such as a home or office or car and which is encrypted and is either ATM card or value-added smart card authenticated. These are real-time electronic cash transactions for the gaming operator.

Wagers will originate from competing landline, wireless or computer equipment.

These PERFECT devices will be given away as with the Shop While You Wait application or will be aggressively mass marketed to the consumer by the phone or utility industry as a method to pay bills from home without writing checks or to purchase without giving a credit card to an operator.

It is the contention of Betting Inc. that many competing types of PERFECT equipment will flood into the marketplace such as the ET&T Pay Master (web site:hpos.com) and that consumers will pay bills, send donations, purchase or wager with these devices.

The business of Betting Inc. is to provide a service interface between the bank host processing centers such as ET&T who are processing these incoming PERFECT wagers by smart card or ATM card and the gaming operators who need to acknowledge receipt of payment to the host processing centers. Betting Inc. is paid a fee per transaction for this service. No accounts receivable.

Since the PERFECT wager is bank to bank, then instant government taxation of the player's winnings being sent by the gaming operator's bank to the player's bank is a reality.

The massive marketing forces of industries pushing to save substantial costs by cutting back on receiving bill payment by checks from their banked customers, closing walk-in bill payment locations for their non-banked customers who will now use PERFECT equipment and value-added smart cards from their homes to pay bills, combined with instant taxation of PERFECT wagering winnings in developed countries, will drive PERFECT equipment to give aways and will allow the average consumer PERFECT wagering on a global basis by 2001.

The mission of Betting Inc. is to establish a global PERFECT wagering presence and to service the first multibillion-dollar pool international PERFECT game occurring on the same day between participating countries.


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To: Jorjenzak who wrote ()5/26/1999 11:48:00 AM
From: Jorjenzak
   of 266
 
To: Dan Meckenstock (199 )
From: Dan Meckenstock Saturday, Jun 20 1998 2:11PM ET
Reply # of 2300

FOR THE RECORD

The Internet casino market could grow from $329.2 mil in 1996 to $7.9 bil by 2001, according to Sebastian Sinclair, consultant, Christiansen/Cummings Associates Inc (New York). Between 50% to 90% of casino wagering accounts are held by US players.

thunder.northernlight.com.


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