SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Non-TechFarming


Previous 10 Next 10 
From: Julius Wong4/24/2021 9:05:28 AM
   of 4068
 
Corn, soybeans extend multi-year highs on tight supplies, weather woes
Apr. 21, 2021 6:21 PM ET Corn Futures (C_1:COM) By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor 3 Comments

U.S. corn and soybean futures extend multi-year highs, supported by firm cash markets as old-crop supplies shrink and cold weather threatens prospects for 2021 harvests.

CBOT corn ( C_1:COM) for May delivery settled +3.1% to $6.25 1/2 per bushel, a nearly eight-year high, while May soybeans ( S_1:COM) ended +1.7% to $14.97 1/4 per bushel, a nearly seven-year high, and July wheat ( W_1:COM) closed +2.1% to $6.75 per bushel.

ETFs: CORN, SOYB, WEAT

Additional support came from concerns about dry conditions stressing Brazil's second-crop corn, as well as freezing temperatures this week across the U.S. midsection.

The Commodity Weather Group said temperatures were cold enough to cause "limited" damage to winter wheat in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma, and could slow the germination of newly seeded corn; the U.S. Department of Agriculture said the U.S. corn crop was 8% planted as of last Sunday.

In another sign of tightening global availability of corn and soy, China's agriculture ministry published guidelines for the reduction of corn and soymeal in pig and poultry feed.

China's appetite for corn is expected to hit a record this year, as dwindling domestic grain reserves prompt the USDA's Beijing office to raise its corn import estimates for the country this year by 17% to 28M metric tons.

In its most recent World Agricultural Supply Demand Report, the USDA estimated this season's corn ending stocks will be nearly 30% below last season's levels, a 567M-bushel decline in U.S. domestic corn inventories in just a year.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (3)


To: Julius Wong who wrote (3975)4/24/2021 9:08:50 AM
From: Julius Wong
1 Recommendation   of 4068
 






Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Aladdin Sane4/24/2021 1:53:54 PM
1 Recommendation   of 4068
 

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Julius Wong who wrote (3975)4/24/2021 8:28:48 PM
From: Aladdin Sane
   of 4068
 
So maybe not quite on deck.. one after on deck .. seller's remorse catalyzing a FOMO rally ..

just talkin'

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Julius Wong who wrote (3975)4/24/2021 8:29:20 PM
From: Aladdin Sane
   of 4068
 
OMG Where is Don Coxe ?

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Julius Wong4/26/2021 10:09:08 PM
   of 4068
 
Wheat price rises to highest in eight years on supply concerns
Apr. 26, 2021 10:45 AM ET Wheat Futures (W_1:COM) By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor 7 Comments

Wheat joins corn and soybeans in surging to multi-year highs, as adverse weather across the Americas and Europe risk pulling down production while markets need large harvests to replenish stretched stockpiles, and China's demand for grains shows no sign of letting up.

Wheat ( W_1:COM) futures in Chicago climbed as much as 4.7% to $7.46 per bushel, highest since February 2013, corn ( C_1:COM) rose by the exchange limit to hit a fresh eight-year high of $6.575, and soybeans ( S_1:COM) are up for a 10th straight session to also reach an eight-year high.

ETFs: WEAT, CORN, SOYB

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Aladdin Sane who wrote (3962)4/27/2021 6:01:15 AM
From: Doo
   of 4068
 
Quality so bad at HD on 2x lumber that I've been going to the locally owned yard exclusively. Price is higher, but quality is excellent. That has it's price with this insanity, and that is $9.26 for 2x4s and just yesterday I paid $14.80 for 2x6s.

Only need a few sheets of 11/32 underlayment...can't wait to see what that crap costs. Several sheets of Advantech I had in the barn were like finding gold the other day. LOL!. And, a big pile of scrap copper I've been holding from a bathroom tear out years ago is looking like I might need it in a vault before spot hits my target of around $6!!!!

Wowee. Good thing there's no inflation.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Doo who wrote (3981)4/27/2021 6:51:47 AM
From: Aladdin Sane
   of 4068
 
I bought myself a little bungalow.. I want to put in an addition to expand for a real dining room as my mom is downsizing at 83 and wants to get rid of her lovely Asian living room and dining room set... all old school solid wood.. lots of nice carving ... she got it appraised .. I think a good deal for me.. but I need a little more space :) (including basement) and step down to a 4 season sun room for my too many house plants and hot tub :) Not this year.. waiting for the crash :) Same old same old.. contractors will be much cheaper as will materials.. I can build a deck or a lovely shed/garage... but an addition I'll wait for a pro :)

BTW have you noticed drywall (gypsum board) is also in short supply ...

Inflation .. when you squeeze the economy balloon... it pops out somewhere.. housing and the things that make houses and the cost of folks that make houses...

Yippee indeed LOL

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Aladdin Sane who wrote (3982)4/27/2021 7:07:57 AM
From: Doo
   of 4068
 
The renovation I'm doing started in October. I doing all of it so I'm taking my time and that has spread out purchases of lumber, etc. beyond what would be typical. Haven't seen my supply of gypsum boards in the family own yard. Ordered a prehung door yesterday. It's one of three I'll use, the first bought back in November. This second door was about 10% higher in price on the same set up.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Julius Wong4/28/2021 8:28:08 AM
   of 4068
 
Why Dead Trees Are ‘the Hottest Commodity on the Planet’
Blame climate change, wildfires, hungry beetles … and Millennial home buyers.

theatlantic.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10