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   Strategies & Market TrendsAnthony @ Equity Investigations, Dear Anthony,


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To: StockDung who wrote (100348)9/7/2007 8:47:39 PM
From: pcyhuang
   of 122050
 
re: NY Times Article

>Deloitte seems to have invoked a little-known auditing standard that says an auditor cannot allow a previously audited financial report to be cited by a company if there are subsequent events “of such a nature that disclosure of them is required to keep the financial statements from being misleading.”

The true reason is this:

ncreif.com.
see slide 17 & 21. There is no way the offering could have gone through, since NFI is still a REIT until the end of the year.

pcyhuang

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From: StockDung9/7/2007 11:07:51 PM
   of 122050
 
COLUMN: Crys-Tel a particularly nasty promotion
By David Baines, Vancouver Sun
Published: Friday, September 07, 2007
In Friday's column, I reviewed two of the many companies that Vancouver promoters Hugh Grenfal and Sergei Stetsenko have taken public on the OTC Bulletin Board in the United States.

Both companies, Aberdene Mines Ltd. and Camden Mines Ltd., were ostensibly formed to explore mineral properties, but the real purpose was to create vehicles for future stock promotions, which soared then collapsed in textbook fashion.

Today, we review Grenfal's and Stetsenko's involvement in a particularly nasty bulletin board promotion called Crys-Tel Communications Ltd.

Until late 1998, Crys-Tel was a shell company operating as Progressive General Corp. Then it announced it would acquire Crys-tel International Inc., a Barbados company which proposed to offer long-distance telephone services over the Internet.

The company's corporate secretary and the contact name on its news releases was Anthony Papalia Jr., son of Anthony Papalia Sr.

Anthony Sr. and his twin brother, Robert, are well known to police in Vancouver, Montreal and London, England.

Born in Italy and raised in Montreal, the twins attracted police and regulatory attention early in their careers. In 1974, the Montreal Exchange delisted their company, Pacific Nickel Mines, for allegedly using company funds to buy shares of a Toronto Stock Exchange company.

The brothers then went to the Bahamas, Panama and eventually to England, where they got into more trouble.

In 1977, they were arrested by Scotland Yard in connection with an alleged plot to defraud investors through their company, Metals Research S.A., which claimed to have a gold mine in B.C.

The twins were denied bail and spent a total of 18 months in jail. During this period, Anthony Papalia escaped from a detention centre, an event which caused much excitement on Fleet Street. However, after lengthy court proceedings, they were acquitted of all charges.

Meanwhile, Anthony Papalia had been charged in Vancouver with defrauding Continental Securities of $51,000. He was convicted in 1982 and sentenced to two years less a day, but the appeal court overturned the conviction and ordered a new trial. Crown counsel decided not to pursue the matter.

By 1986, the Papalias had moved to Vancouver and taken control of Vancouver Stock Exchange-listed American Westwater Technology Group. In September 1986, the stock rose to a high of $9.75 on the basis of its proposed acquisition of some medical technology and an interest in a car distributorship.

RCMP commenced an investigation and alleged in search warrant documents that the Papalias had been manipulating the company's stock price. In February 1987, the VSE suspended trading "pending clarification of the affairs of the company." Two months later, Robert Papalia resigned as president and the stock slumped to 20 cents.

In December 1988, the RCMP recommended charges against the Papalia brothers, but only one charge of issuing a false prospectus was laid against Robert, and that charge was later dropped.

In 1990, the Papalias joined the board of VSE-listed Rhyolite Resources. However, the VSE refused to reinstate the company for trading due to the Papalias' history. After being effectively blackballed by the VSE, the twins did what most disgraced promoters do: They moved their deals to the U.S. over-the-counter markets.

One of these deals was Crys-Tel. Officially, the company was run by Anthony Jr., but the twins were very much involved through their companies, Kaiden S.A. and PacRim Information Systems Inc., which held significant share positions in Crys-Tel.

In January 1999, the stock peaked at $4 US. Then the company fell apart, the share price collapsed, and the lawsuits began to fly.

One was filed in B.C. Supreme Court by Crys-Tel against Grenfal and Stetsenko, who were never mentioned in Crys-Tel's official disclosure documents, but would soon emerge as central players in the company's formation and financing.

Crys-Tel said in its lawsuit that it hired the pair to promote the company and raise working capital. In consideration, the company issued them an unspecified number of shares through offshore nominees.

However, instead of working in the best interests of the company, the company alleged they shorted the stock, a trading strategy designed to depress the stock price and capitalize on the price decline.

Stetsenko and Grenfal denied the allegations, saying they had only bought and sold a few shares through open market purchases.

This was disputed by James Rodgers, a former Vancouver lawyer who acted as the company's chief executive officer. He filed a lengthy affidavit claiming that Stetsenko and Grenfal were very intimately involved in Crys-Tel.

He said Grenfal and Stetsenko introduced him to the business opportunity, which they told him had been developed by a group that included the Papalias. He said they asked him to find a suitable shell, which he found through Miami attorney Eric Littman.

(Littman would be later sanctioned by U.S. regulators for undisclosed stock dealings in setting up a shell company that was used as the vehicle for a bulletin board pump-and-dump fraud called Nutraceutical Clinical Laboratories International Inc.)

Rodgers also described in his affidavit how, after the phone business was merged with the shell company, he and Stetsenko flew to the Bahamas to set up brokerage accounts. He also said Grenfal set up an offshore account through Bermuda-based Lines Overseas Management.

(In recent months, LOM has been hotly pursued by B.C. and U.S. authorities who want to find out who's behind LOM accounts used in recent stock manipulations, including some with Vancouver links.)

Rodgers told Canada Stockwatch that Crys-Tel stock was funnelled offshore at the request of the two promoters.

"That's what they wanted," he was quoted as saying. "This is a standard Vancouver special, there is nothing out of the ordinary."

Crys-Tel did not pursue the lawsuit and it was eventually dismissed for want of prosecution, but not before the two sides aired a lot of dirty laundry.

Rodgers, meanwhile, had got himself into a bit of a pickle over another bulletin board deal called Net 1 UEPS Technologies Inc., which ran to $18 US in 1998, then collapsed.

Rogers served as the company's president, and his investor relations person was Wally Dekanich. Rodgers claimed he and Dekanich eventually learned that criminal elements were involved in the deal, including Hells Angels, and offered to cooperate with police.

Rodgers said that due to his agreement to cooperate, he was physically threatened, but not harmed. Dekanich was not so fortunate. In January 2001, he was gunned down in the doorway of his North Vancouver townhouse.

Mickey Phillip Smith was charged with the contract killing of Dekanich and four others, including Joseph Gaja, 48, who was killed in May 1993 after being lured outside the Century Plaza Hotel and shot in the head while sitting in the front passenger seat of a vehicle.

Smith, although he had confessed to undercover cops, denied responsibility. One of the witnesses for his defence was to have been Grenfal.

Grenfal had been overheard boasting at a restaurant that his "brother" had killed Gaja. Police testified that Grenfal boasted of knowing details of the killing not reported in the media, specifically that Gaja had been shot in the vehicle, that the car was in an underground lot, and the victim was wearing a seatbelt.

However, Grenfal has no brother, so he was not taken seriously. "How Mr. Grenfal got that [holdback] information remains a gap in the evidence," the prosecutor told court.

Rodgers, hoping to avoid trouble, moved to Creston, but under continued strain, he became mentally unhinged and waived a firearm at a person. In August 2004, he pled guilty to pointing a firearm and uttering a threat. He was given a conditional sentence by the court.

The B.C. Law Society reviewed the matter and, despite the seriousness of the offence, issued a reprimand only.

"It is important to note that the respondent was under extreme and significant pressure at the time the conduct in question occurred," the hearing tribunal noted. "The respondent had agreed to testify against members of a criminal organization. As a result his life, and perhaps the lives of his family, were in peril.

"It started with the respondent doing his duty as a lawyer and a citizen agreeing to testify against alleged criminals at the risk of his life. For this, the respondent suffered terribly."

In the end, Rodgers' was not called to testify. His evidence wasn't needed. Smith was convicted of all five murders. But the justice system missed a golden opportunity to shine some much-needed light on the very dark world of Vancouver bulletin board deals.
dbaines@png.canwest.com

© Vancouver Sun

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From: StockDung9/7/2007 11:31:00 PM
   of 122050
 
Paulson Credit Fund Rises Fivefold on Subprime Bets (Update1)

By Jenny Strasburg

Sept. 7 (Bloomberg) -- Paulson & Co.'s biggest credit hedge fund rose fivefold in 2007 after the New York-based investment firm with $20 billion in assets under management bet U.S. subprime-mortgage defaults would soar.

The $4.5 billion Credit Opportunities fund, started last year, gained 26.7 percent in August, according to a Paulson investor. Credit Opportunities II, a newer $2.3 billion fund, is up more than threefold after a 32 percent return last month. The firm, founded by John Paulson in 1994, more than doubled its assets since the start of the year.

U.S. home-loan foreclosures rose to a record 0.65 percent in the second quarter, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association in Washington. U.S. asset-backed debt including some mortgage-backed bonds fell 3.5 percent last month following a 1.2 percent drop in July, the two largest declines in at least 13 years, according to Merrill Lynch & Co.'s broadest index that includes bonds linked to subprime or second mortgages.

``These guys made a big bet at the right time, and they're being rewarded for it,'' said David Nelson, chief executive officer of Greenwich, Connecticut-based DC Nelson Asset Management LLC, which isn't invested in the Paulson funds.

Hedge funds run by Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Tudor Investment Corp and D.E. Shaw & Co. declined amid widening credit spreads and stock-market volatility. Losses in subprime- related holdings forced managers including New York-based Bear Stearns Cos. to close funds.

SAC Capital

SAC Capital Advisors LLC, the Stamford, Connecticut-based hedge-fund firm run by Steven Cohen, raised $1 billion from investors last month as its biggest fund fell 3 percent. The $8 billion SAC Capital International Fund finished August up 10 percent for the year, according to an investor who declined to be identified.

In August, Paulson increased 5.2 percent in its event- driven fund that invests in debt of distressed companies, extending that fund's 2007 advance to 69 percent.

A spokesman for John Paulson declined to comment.

Before starting his hedge-fund firm, Paulson, 51, was general partner at New York-based investment firm Gruss Partners. He was a managing director at Bear Stearns from 1984 to 1988 after earning a master's degree from Harvard Business School in Boston.

Managers had their second-best fund-raising quarter from April to June, attracting $58.7 billion globally from investors, according to industry tracker Hedge Fund Research Inc. of Chicago. Hedge funds oversee more than $1.7 trillion, almost triple the amount five years ago.

Hedge funds are private, largely unregulated pools of capital whose managers can buy or sell any assets and participate substantially in profits from money invested.

To contact the reporters on this story: Jenny Strasburg in New York at jstrasburg@bloomberg.net .

Last Updated: September 7, 2007 17:14 EDT

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From: StockDung9/7/2007 11:49:26 PM
   of 122050
 
Fugitive fundraiser Hsu captured in Colorado
Jaxon Van Derbeken,John Coté, Chronicle Staff Writers

Friday, September 7, 2007

(09-07) 07:33 PDT SAN FRANCISCO -- Fugitive political fundraiser Norman Hsu, who skipped out on San Mateo County authorities this week rather than face sentencing for a 1992 fraud conviction, was apprehended Thursday night by federal and local lawmen in Grand Junction, Colo.

Authorities said Hsu was taken into custody at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Junction at 7 p.m. local time. He had been on the lam for almost two days after failing to appear in a Redwood City courtroom Wednesday to surrender his passport.

Hsu was taken off an eastbound passenger train at the Grand Junction train station earlier in the day by paramedics who requested a backboard to move him, said Sgt. Lonnie Chavez with the Grand Junction Police Department.

Authorities received a request for medical assistance at the train station at about 11:15 a.m., but the exact nature of Hsu's condition was unclear, Chavez said.

Hsu was traveling on an Amtrak train when he became ill, and Amtrak personnel called an ambulance when the train stopped in Grand Junction, said Pete Smarr, a nursing supervisor at St. Mary’s Hospital. Hsu was listed in fair condition early Friday, but Smarr declined to comment on the nature of Hsu's illness or a timetable for his release from the hospital.

Hsu was arrested in Colorado on federal charges of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution after the California attorney general's office sought assistance from federal authorities in apprehending him, FBI spokesman Joseph Schadler said. The federal charges will be dropped once Hsu is returned to California to face sentencing in state court, Schadler said.

Hsu's attorney told state prosecutors that Hsu had been on a charter flight that arrived at Oakland International Airport at about 5:30 a.m. Wednesday and then dropped out of sight, said Gareth Lacy, a spokesman for the state attorney general's office.

Amtrak's California Zephyr train offers service from nearby Emeryville to Grand Junction before heading to Denver and Chicago. The Zephyr left Emeryville at about 7:10 a.m. Wednesday and was scheduled to arrive in Grand Junction before noon Thursday.

Hsu's disappearing act seemed to be a reprise of a move he pulled 15 years ago, when he failed to show up for sentencing in the same grand theft case. Hsu was facing up to three years in state prison, a $10,000 fine and restitution payments after pleading no contest to a single count of grand theft in what prosecutors described as a $1 million fraud scheme.

But while free on bail after his plea, Hsu dropped from sight for 15 years, apparently spending time in Hong Kong, the Philippines and Taiwan, only to emerge in recent years as a seemingly wealthy New York resident who donated generously to Democratic political campaigns, regularly attended fundraisers and was photographed with party leaders.

A week ago, Hsu, 56, surrendered to San Mateo County sheriff's deputies in Redwood City after press accounts linked him to the earlier grand theft case. He spent a few hours in county jail before posting $2 million bail and agreeing to surrender his passport.

The state attorney general's office, which is prosecuting the case, initially sought bail of $1 million, but San Mateo Superior Court Judge James Ellis doubled that to $2 million - the amount specified in the arrest warrant.

After Hsu posted bail, his attorney, Jim Brosnahan, sent a legal assistant to Hsu's New York condominium Monday to retrieve the passport but was unable to find it after a 90-minute search.

Before Hsu was captured Thursday night, Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell became the latest Democratic figure to distance himself from the fundraiser, announcing earlier in the day that he would donate to charity almost $40,000 Hsu contributed to his campaign.

"Though Norman is my friend, and remains so, his failure to appear casts a new light on his assertions regarding the original case," Rendell said in a prepared statement. "As a result, I will follow other elected officials and donate the money he contributed to me to charity."

Hsu, listed as a "Hillraiser" committed to bringing in $100,000 or more to the presidential campaign of New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, has given an estimated $600,000 of his own money to candidates ranging from San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom and Assemblywoman Fiona Ma to presidential hopeful Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois. Hsu has helped raise hundreds of thousands more through high-profile events in New York and California and served on the board of trustees of New York City's New School university at the request of Bob Kerrey, the university's president and former Democratic senator from Nebraska.

The size and scope of Hsu's contributions made him one of the party's largest individual contributors. While he gave $23,000 to Clinton and $7,000 to Obama, he also gave $62,000 to New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer, $50,000 to New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, and $50,000 to the New York State Democratic Party.

His contributions also included $38,000 to the Tennessee Democratic Party, $750 to Newsom, $1,250 to San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris, and $3,500 to the 25th Ward Democratic Organization in Chicago.

In the 1991-92 grand theft case, Hsu was charged with bilking about 20 investors, including his ex-girlfriend, out of about $1 million in connection with a business that was supposed to provide latex gloves to another firm - only no gloves were ever bought or sold, prosecutors said.

"What Mr. Hsu was in the business of was running a Ponzi scheme," prosecutor Ron Smetana said at a preliminary hearing, according to the transcript. "He was taking money and spending part of it on himself and returning it as it was available. As with any Ponzi scheme, the first ones in and the first ones out always do quite well. Those (who) hope that their investment will continue and stay to the end tend to lose their shorts."

After the glove business collapsed in April 1990, Hsu was kidnapped four months later in San Francisco by a Chinatown gang leader in an effort to collect a debt from him, police said. The abduction was foiled after the car they were riding in ran a red light in Foster City and was pulled over by police, who rescued Hsu, authorities said.

E-mail the writers at jvanderbeken@sfchronicle.com and jcote@sfchronicle.com.

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To: magicrecall who wrote (88243)9/8/2007 12:07:44 AM
From: StockDung
   of 122050
 
Bud Burrell says: "As far as anyone coloring my efforts, I haven't been paid anything by USXP in nearly 2 years."

quote in reply below.

Re: For General Comments and Questions from Today Forward. By Valueinvestor on 9/7/2007 2:24 PM
Bud...I understand you are more or less out of the loop from USXP at the persent time, but I wanted to revist some history with you, s'il vous plait...

Among companies that have claimed excessive naked shorting of their stock, I believe you have always spoken favorably of OSTK and USXP and not so favorably of CMKX, just t picking three. In the case of USXP, you have believed in Richard Altomare and his prolonged fight with the SEC relative to naked shorting, although you have always stated that you are not cognizant of the day-to-day running of the company and the hundreds of press releases put out by the CEO about funding, acquisitions, etc. Many of us, including myself, have high regard for you, your scholarship and your relentless fight for a just cause, thus my quandary of how you see things in the unfoldment of this particular stock and company.

As Richard himself said in one webcast, most folks either consider him to be "Sister Cabrini or Adolf Hitler". In other words, that is how much gap there is in people's surmisal of his character, depending on their own mental and psychological makeup or their exposure to him via their investment in the stock. I am not even including those gutless bashers here. Many of us are curious as to how you would explain the vast lack of transparency in all of Altomare's dealings over the past several years, especially w.r.t. his shareholders ? Who are the royal arabs and other not-so royal Dubai investors ? If they have purchased the entire float, why is this being kept such a secret ? Where are the filings of ownership if they own more than 5% of the outstanding stock ? Why did Richard mention in webcasts several times that the funds "are almost here" and never once did they reach their destination ? Why would the CEO claim a collection of memorabilia of Michael Jackson and family could fetch from 30 to 200 million when it later proved it was not even worth the money promised to the seller ? Why does the CEO repeatedly claim that the company has moved over 30 million bags to date without losing a single one when the reported revenues do not justify even 1% of that fantastic amount ? I could go on and on...

What I am getting at is perhaps there is a good answer to all of these apparent anomalies, but I would be damned if I can see it. Unfortunately, since you have always been a great supporter of Richard, some might question your motives in not challenging these rather blatant discrepencies, and therefore color oyur other yeoman like efforts over the past two decades, unless they can somehow resolve this conflict within themselves. I for one would love to hear what your explanation is on this subject. Thanks and best wishes..

Reply: This will come out in the wash of the appeal. The Receiver will have to be the one answering these questions now. She, as predicted, closed the doors, threw out the employees, changed the locks, and is now running an empty room.

As far as anyone coloring my efforts, I haven't been paid anything by USXP in nearly 2 years. I don't offer explanations or excuses to anyone. The Judge ignored the SEC's agreement to a jury trial on his own authority, saying a Jury couldn't understand the cases. Well, two juries and two judges already did.

I won't be commenting further, as I know nothing of the manner in which Ms. Moscowitz will see fit to discharge her duties. I expect her to lead the remains of the Company to de-registration and/or bankruptcy, either outcome meaning the shorts don't have to cover. The SEC will again protect the shorts.

I will be watching her actions, and I will reserve all my rights as a very significant unsecured creditor.


thesanitycheck.com

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To: Patchie who wrote (100334)9/8/2007 9:38:48 PM
From: StockDung
   of 122050
 
UPDATE: It will be interesting to see what kind of slugs Ms. Moscowitz can find under the rug. One just outed himself yesterday -- C. Austin "Bud" Burrell, who operates a pink sheet outfit called Private Trading Systems when he isn't yammering nonsense about naked shorting. Here's a pretty good take on that company and its interesting ownership.

Burrell, a shrill defender of Universal Express, and now a leading defender of that other naked shorting "victim" Overstock.com, disclosed yesterday on Phil Saunders' "thesanitycheck.com" website that he had been on the Universal Express payroll up till about two years ago. He also said that he is a "very significant unsecured creditor."

It will be interesting to see how much money this naked shorting poster child has been flushing down the toilet with characters like this.

© 2007 Gary Weiss. All rights reserved.

garyweiss.blogspot.com
---------------------------------------------
Does it Matter When Ms. Moscowitz Takes Over Your Company?

Yes, friends, that is today's philosophical question. Does Moscowitz matter? I learned from an Internet rumor today that a receiver had been appointed to take over naked shorting poster child Universal Express, that her name was Moscowitz and that she's now running the show.

Then I turned to the company's website. Nothing. Edgar: nothing, no SEC filings. No Moscowitz.

So then I checked the electronic filings of the U.S. District Court in lower Manhattan, and there she be: Moscowitz!

I found an order by Judge Gerald E. Lynch, dated Aug. 31 and filed on Sept. 4, that said as follows:

For the reasons stated in the order of August 30, 2007, and upon due consideration of potential candidates, it is hereby ordered that Jane W. Moscowitz of Miami, Florida be appointed receiver for Universal Express Inc. to determine Universal Express's actual financial state, to collect and conserve what assets the company has, and to report its findings to the court.
Just so you don't think I'm making this up, here is a screen shot of the decision:

What this means is that Universal Express's loudmouth CEO Richard Altomare, the sergeant-at-arms of the naked shorting conspiracy loons, is out out OUT! (As Ralph Kramden would have said.) Moscowitz is in.

Now, back to my question. Is this important? I mean, when the court names a lady to come in to your offices and "collect and preserve" your assets -- isn't that worth disclosing to your shareholders?

As a matter of fact, as I pointed out the other day, when the judge issued his initial decision on August 30, Altomare issued a press release not mentioning that a receiver was going to be appointed. So I guess the company wouldn't want to mention that the receiver has been named, that her name is Moscowitz, and that the loudmouth is out out OUT.

Which leads me to another question that I have raised before: Where is the Justice Department? Is there any particular reason why Universal Express isn't the subject of more than an SEC lawsuit?

UPDATE: It will be interesting to see what kind of slugs Ms. Moscowitz can find under the rug. One just outed himself yesterday -- C. Austin "Bud" Burrell, who operates a pink sheet outfit called Private Trading Systems when he isn't yammering nonsense about naked shorting. Here's a pretty good take on that company and its interesting ownership.

Burrell, a shrill defender of Universal Express, and now a leading defender of that other naked shorting "victim" Overstock.com, disclosed yesterday on Phil Saunders' "thesanitycheck.com" website that he had been on the Universal Express payroll up till about two years ago. He also said that he is a "very significant unsecured creditor."

It will be interesting to see how much money this naked shorting poster child has been flushing down the toilet with characters like this.

© 2007 Gary Weiss. All rights reserved.

garyweiss.blogspot.com

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To: SEC-ond-chance who wrote (100281)9/8/2007 9:43:11 PM
From: StockDung
   of 122050
 
Sentencing scheduled for man in offshore tax-fraud scheme

RALEIGH - Sentencing is scheduled for next month for a man authorities say was involved in an offshore tax-fraud scheme in the Bahamas that involved a former head of the North Carolina Republican Party.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Charlotte said yesterday that Howell Woltz, who has pleaded guilty, is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 1 for his role in the case that also involved Samuel T. Currin of Raleigh, a former U.S. attorney, state judge and state Republican chairman.

Currin was sentenced this week to almost six years in federal prison on charges related to tax-fraud conspiracy.

journalnow.com!localnews&s=1037645509099

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To: Patchie who wrote (100317)9/8/2007 9:47:09 PM
From: StockDung
   of 122050
 
Bud Burrell says about USXP: Reply: I provided litigation support to the in house General Counsel for over 4 years. What they owe me is privileged.

This isn't over yet. We need to watch and listen, while looking for patterns.

=======================================================

Re: For General Comments and Questions from Today Forward.

By Sandy on 9/8/2007 6:54 AM

Bud,

You worked for Universal Express?

What do they owe you and what work did you do fo Universal Express?

They where lucky to have a man like you that is so knowledgeable about shortie.

Thank you Bud for all that you do for us.

Sandy

Reply: I provided litigation support to the in house General Counsel for over 4 years. What they owe me is privileged.

This isn't over yet. We need to watch and listen, while looking for patterns.

thesanitycheck.com

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To: Patchie who wrote (100334)9/8/2007 9:52:41 PM
From: StockDung
   of 122050
 
Patchie, how many companies are paying you for litigation support just like Bud Burrell is getting from stock fraud Universal Express?

How many other companies are paying other bloggers on thesanitycheck for "litigation support"?

Time for you jokers to come clean!!!

Its no wonder during his pod casts on CFRN Bud Burrell was so high on this Universal express stock fraud.

He should have been disclosing his interest as you well know.
-----------------------------------------------------

Bud Burrell says about USXP: Reply: I provided litigation support to the in house General Counsel for over 4 years. What they owe me is privileged.

This isn't over yet. We need to watch and listen, while looking for patterns.

=======================================================

Re: For General Comments and Questions from Today Forward.

By Sandy on 9/8/2007 6:54 AM

Bud,

You worked for Universal Express?

What do they owe you and what work did you do fo Universal Express?

They where lucky to have a man like you that is so knowledgeable about shortie.

Thank you Bud for all that you do for us.

Sandy

Reply: I provided litigation support to the in house General Counsel for over 4 years. What they owe me is privileged.

This isn't over yet. We need to watch and listen, while looking for patterns.

thesanitycheck.com

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To: StockDung who wrote (100361)9/8/2007 10:38:52 PM
From: anniebonny
   of 122050
 
Just eavesdropping - I assume Sandy is Sandy Winick of BKMP fame??? No wonder he was impressed and felt lucky.

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