SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Non-TechAmati investors


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: Cham Yean who started this subject8/17/2003 3:21:46 PM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
World DSL sales up, but revenues drop

By CNET News.com Staff
August 15, 2003, 10:40 AM PT
news.com.com

The worldwide market for digital subscriber line (DSL) equipment witnessed strong growth in the second quarter of 2003, with the Asia Pacific and Latin America regions topping the charts, according to preliminary results from the research firm Gartner.
However, average vendor revenue per port has dropped from $95.9 in the first quarter of 2003 to $84 in the second quarter.

"Cost is clearly the key in the DSL equipment market," Jouni Forsman, principal analyst for Gartner’s telecoms group, said in a statement. "Prices will continue to be challenged. Vendors must continue rolling out increasingly cost-effective equipment, while maintaining future value-added service capability of the platform."

For the third consecutive quarter, DSL gear sales posted record growth. Global sales for DSL access multiplexer (DSLAM) ports reached 9.8 million units, up 81.3 percent from a year ago and 16.5 percent over last quarter. Similarly, shipments for customer premise equipment (CPE) increased 59.5 percent compared with last year and 16.2 percent over the last quarter.

Gartner said Japan and North America registered declines in sales growth. "The regulatory situation in the United States is difficult, and the competitive power of cable is strongly felt. Major incumbents are also looking into fiber as a DSL alternative," the research firm said.

Vendors should expect the European and Chinese markets to be the major growth drivers for the next few quarters, the firm added.

"China will continue to increase in importance as an individual key market," said Gauri Pavate, principal analyst at Gartner’s telecom group. "CPE shipments will have to increase to catch up with the installed base of central office (CO) ports, and the unit growth on this side of the business will be stronger than CO in the future."

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Cham Yean who started this subject11/3/2003 9:27:41 AM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
Conexant to buy GlobespanVirata for 14% premium

The fun continues...

6:43am 11/03/03

Conexant to buy GlobespanVirata for 14% premium (GSPN, CNXT)

By Tomi Kilgore

NEW YORK (CBS.MW) - Conexant Systems (CNXT) announced an agreement to acquire GlobespanVirata (GSPN) , creating a company with a combined market value of $2.8 billion. Under terms of the deal, Conexant will exchange 1.198 shares of its stock for each GlobespanVirata share outstanding. Based on Friday's closing prices, the deal values GlobespanVirata $7 a share, or a 14 percent premium. With 138.5 million diluted GlobespanVirata shares outstanding at the end of September, the deal values the chip company at approximately $969.5 million. Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to be in the first quarter of 2004, Conexant will own 62.75 percent of the combined company. Conexant shares closed Friday down 25 cents at $5.84 and GlobespanVirata fell 82 cents to $6.15.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Cham Yean who started this subject12/29/2003 2:08:31 PM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
DSL IC Market Rebounding, Shifting to VDSL

There are some nice charts and graphics @ the URL, but here's the text.

Wishing all Amatites a Healthy, Happy 2004,

-Steve

reed-electronics.com


DSL IC Market Rebounding, Shifting to VDSL

In-Stat/MDR, Scottsdale, Ariz. -- 12/1/2003
Semiconductor International


The market for DSL ICs rebounded, in terms of port shipments, in 2002, after a difficult 2001 that was characterized by an excess of inventory in the face of slower overall deployment of ADSL than had originally been expected at the height of the of telecom "bubble" in 2000. Total silicon shipments rose from 38.1 million ports in 2001 to 50.0 million ports in 2002. However, because of declining average selling prices (ASPs), total DSL IC revenue fell from $699.0M in 2001 to $594.9M in 2002.

There are several drivers and challenges for DSL services and equipment, and, as a component-level device, DSL IC shipments are largely a function of the growth of DSL services. Key drivers include consumer demand for broadband content and services, new service provider revenue opportunities, reduction of subscriber churn, dense urban populations in Asia and, to a lesser extent, Europe, and strong service provider competition in Asia. Challenges seem to be U.S.-focused, with service provider financial difficulties in the United States, longer local loop lengths in the United States, the problematic U.S. regulatory situation, predominance of cable modems as the broadband access technology of choice in the United States, and content provider intransigence.

In-Stat/MDR has also found that:

The DSL IC market was fairly concentrated in 2002, with the top four vendors — GlobespanVirata, STMicroelectronics, Centillium and Texas Instruments — together "owning" about 81% of the total ports shipments to the market in 2002. However, other vendors shipped significant portions of DSL subcategory ICs, such as VDSL and SHDSL.
In-Stat/MDR expects the total market for DSL ICs to grow from about 50.0 million ports in 2002 to 107.9 million ports by 2007. Likewise, total revenue is expected to rise from about $594.9M in 2002 to $732.8M by 2007.
The percentage of the market represented by ADSL will decline through 2007, while VDSL's percentage will grow significantly, mostly in the Asia-Pacific region. Although SHDSL will grow strongly over the forecast period, it will not comprise more than 10% of the market by 2007.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: riposte who wrote (31339)12/29/2003 2:26:45 PM
From: Walt Deemer
   of 31386
 
And a Happy and Healthy New Year to you too, Steve!

-- Walt (via an Alcatel DSL connection)

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Walt Deemer who wrote (31340)12/29/2003 5:20:17 PM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
Best of 2004 to you too, Walt!!!

...Via a "Sprint" (Zyxel) 645M DSL modem...who ever heard of "Zyxel"????

Geeze...

Take care,

-Steve

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: riposte who wrote (31341)12/30/2003 12:35:24 AM
From: Michael F. Donadio
   of 31386
 
Best to you both in the New Year from Mike still forced to use a cable modem!!!
Maybe with ADSL2+ I may finally get DSL, or who knows, Verizon may lay down some FTTC.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Cham Yean who started this subject8/10/2004 7:54:48 AM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
Westell Technologies And Mitel To Share Integrated Communications Technology

Wonder if there's any remnants of Amati Inside?

August 09, 2004

Westell Technologies And Mitel To Share Integrated Communications Technology

Westell and Mitel will share broadband connectivity technology under a new agreement; the arrangement has already yielded a development deal for a multimedia access device for a US-based carrier.



Westell Technologies and Mitel will jointly develop multimedia access devices enabling integrated voice, video, and data communication using DSL broadband technology. Under the arrangement, Westell will integrate Mitel's IP telephony solutions into Westell's broadband access platforms, and Mitel will market an access product that integrates voice, video, data, and DSL.
The Westell-Mitel agreement has already produced a new product development deal. The two firms are delivering a multimedia access device integrating voice, video, data, WiFi, and DSL to an undisclosed U.S.-based service provider. This device will service both enterprise and residential customers.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: JW@KSC who wrote (31334)8/19/2004 11:01:12 AM
From: hal jordan
   of 31386
 
I'm on cable too..and its much better than DSL. I had both at the same time as a comparison and my experience with cable was much better. Smoother, quicker screens. As far as DSL, I am fairly close to the CO, so distance was not an issue.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: hal jordan who wrote (31344)8/20/2004 9:35:50 AM
From: riposte
   of 31386
 
It's not a matter as to whether DSL is "better" than cable, or not. It just depends on the level of service they are willing to provide, or you're willing to buy. Sprint's DSL can be upgraded for I think $10-$15/month to provide 1.5Mb/S. My brother-in-law did it.

Another interesting thing to consider is that the telephone infrastructure tends to be more robust than that of the cable companyies. I just survived Hurricane Charley, and while I had telco and DSL the entire time, I can tell you that the cable TV hardline is still laying in the roads.

Just another datapoint.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: riposte who wrote (31345)8/20/2004 10:11:19 AM
From: hal jordan
   of 31386
 
Thats just my personal experience. Certainly your provider, whether its a telco or cable company, will set price points and value. I have Comcast as my cable company. They provide a better on-line experience than the local telco.

There is no doubt the telco is more robust. Although both customer service bureaus stink. Wrong answers, whether its about pricing or a technical issue.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10