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   Non-TechAirline Discussion Board


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To: Sam who wrote (1609)7/14/2021 11:48:23 AM
From: Art Bechhoefer
   of 1757
 
The WSJ article overlooks the key variable in airline profits – number of gates, landing and takeoff spots for a given airport at a given time. United controls most of the space at Newark airport. American Airlines dominates Charlotte. Delta has a somewhat dominant position in Atlanta. Fixed costs are not entirely tied to aircraft ownership, since many airlines lease their aircraft. It is definitely tied to the cost of airport terminals and gates, which should have been mentioned in the article. Cost cutting should also have been noted, as expressed in cutting number of flights, creating fewer non-stop flights in favor of more stops and connections, and cutting food and other amenities to the bone. So much for customer satisfaction.

Art

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From: TimF7/14/2021 9:42:58 PM
   of 1757
 

external-preview.redd.it

Larger
external-preview.redd.it

reddit.com

Runway Over The Highway at Leipzig/Halle Airport in Germany

youtube.com

en.wikipedia.org

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From: Sam7/21/2021 3:01:50 PM
   of 1757
 
Southwest Airlines set to take off for Q2 earnings

Jul. 21, 2021 2:23 PM ET Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) Delta Air Lines, Inc. (DAL) United Airlines Holdings, Inc. (UAL) Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) By: Shweta Agarwal, SA News Editor 3 Comments


seekingalpha.com

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From: Sam7/23/2021 1:42:44 PM
1 Recommendation   of 1757
 
American Is the Year's Best Airline Stock. Wall Street Is Getting More Bullish. -- Barrons.com
DOW JONES & COMPANY, INC. 12:46 PM ET 7/23/2021

American has been the year's best airline stock, but it's winning more backing on Wall Street with several analysts upgrading the stock after a relatively strong earnings report.

Seaport Global Securities'Daniel McKenzie upgraded American (ticker: AAL) stock to a Buy rating with a $27 target on Friday. While it's still early in the recovery, he wrote, "increased comfort" around corporate and trans-Atlantic revenue, combined with the carrier's plans to strengthen its balance sheet, are driving "increased conviction" in earnings for 2022.

American is expecting a robust recovery in domestic business revenue, McKenzie noted, and its international routes offer exposure to pent-up business demand in the U.K., Europe, and Brazil; American has a new code-sharing agreement with the Brazilian domestic carrier GOL Linhas Aereas Inteligentes (GOL).

American has cut labor and operating costs, partly by removing 157 planes from its fleet and improving operating efficiencies with only four major aircraft models. The carrier has also developed strategic partnerships with JetBlue Airways (JBLU) and Alaska Air (ALK), deals that could add $1 billion in 2022 revenue, McKenzie estimated.

The carrier could lift margins as well by winnowing its massive debt, including $36 billion of long-term debt and leasing liabilities on its balance sheet. American said this week that it aims to cut its debt by $15 billion over the next four years, taking a big chunk of liabilities off its books.

McKenzie estimated that American will post earnings per share of $3.50 in 2023, potentially hitting $4 to $4.50 if partnerships with JetBlue and Alaska pan out. At his target of $27, the stock would still trade at merely 6 times EPS of $3.50.

All that said, American's common equity is now worth just $14 billion -- or 39% of its long-term debt. And there are no guarantees that American won't continue to dilute its shares, as it's done throughout the pandemic, as it aims to ramp up capacity and compete for more revenue in a recovery.

American's high-volume strategy could also run into headwinds if the demand climate doesn't cooperate.

New coronavirus cases are soaring, again with the Delta variant taking root in the U.S., Europe, and other regions. Australia and New Zealand has suspended their travel corridor, and the U.S. has yet to allow travel from Europe, Brazil, India, and China for noncitizens.

Airline stocks have been grounded for months, moreover, consolidating gains from late 2020 as vaccinations became widespread and travel demand started to rise. The sector is down 10% in the last three months against a 4.5% return for the S&P 500.

Nonetheless, analysts are raising earnings estimates across the sector after a slew of relatively upbeat earnings reports from carriers such as Delta Air Lines (DAL), United Airlines Holdings (UAL) and Southwest Airlines (LUV).

Along those lines, Cowen's Helane Becker raised her target on American to $23 while maintaining a Market Perform rating. Her 2023 EPS estimate is well below McKenzie's, at $2.55, though. At her $23 target, the stock would trade at 9 times earnings.

Bernstein analyst David Vernon also liked American's report, writing that, "if anything, the guidance is more bullish than we expected." He maintained an Outperform rating and $28 target.

JP Morgan's Jamie Baker also lifted estimates on American, though he's staying bearish. While he hiked his target to $17 from $14 and lifted his 2022 EPS target to $1.95 from $1.65, he maintained an Underweight rating.

"We do not believe the company's balance sheet strategy has been prudent, especially given the current turbulent environment, and we see better value elsewhere in our coverage," Baker wrote.

Betting against American has been the wrong call this year, though. The stock is up 35% this year, trouncing the 13.5% gain for the NYSE Arca Airline Index. In fact, no other airline stock has comes close -- the next best performer has been Spirit Airlines (SAVE) at 14.3%.

Investors appear to have viewed American as a fixer-upper that's managed to renovate its house enough to compete as demand recovers. Whether the stock lives up to those expectations is the bet investors are making now.



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To: Sam who wrote (1613)7/23/2021 2:16:38 PM
From: Art Bechhoefer
1 Recommendation   of 1757
 
I doubt that American Airlines is anxious to reduce its debt, especially if the debt carries fixed interest rates. We are entering into a period of inflation that will most likely result in higher interest rates on any new debt. They'd be wise to hold onto their existing debt, especially if the interest rate on that debt is comparatively low.

In my latest flight (on American from Rochester, NY to San Francisco), I noted that the Chicago – SFO of the flight was listed jointly under several airlines, indicating that American had effectively leased seating to other airlines to fill all the seats. The entire flight to and from was filled to capacity. Given that they provided only pretzels and soft drinks and no other amenities, I can't see how they possibly could NOT make money on these flights.

Art

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From: Moonray7/25/2021 6:29:55 PM
   of 1757
 
Airports in the West face shortage of jet fuel

o~~~ O

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To: Moonray who wrote (1615)7/27/2021 1:27:40 PM
From: Moonray
1 Recommendation   of 1757
 
Jet-fuel shortage

o~~~ O

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From: Sam7/28/2021 12:37:37 PM
1 Recommendation   of 1757
 
They Got Great Deals on Airfare. Then Came the Flight Changes.

Fliers who thought they’d scored cheap fares on Delta and other airlines are getting rebooked on longer, less convenient itineraries—and that’s just the start of their headaches

What’s one difference between airline tickets and lottery tickets? With lottery tickets you know when the event will occur.

Airlines’ rampant schedule changes have confused and angered fliers. Travelers who bet on reopening and bought cheap tickets earlier this year are especially vexed, with some claiming that airlines are moving them to less convenient flights and times to make room for higher-paying customers as travel surges.

Airlines deny that they’re bumping customers who got deals, though some do move low-fare passengers before higher-fare customers when their frequent schedule changes create overbooked situations.

continues at wsj.com

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To: Sam who wrote (1617)7/28/2021 3:41:20 PM
From: Art Bechhoefer
1 Recommendation   of 1757
 
The WSJ report is in line with my own experience flying Delta from Rochester, NY to Amsterdam earlier this year. Most airlines, including Delta, cancelled flights during the pandemic, which often meant that a formerly non-stop flight often changed to one with a stopover. Delta allowed cancellation with no penalty, but the point is that the changes were for the convenience (and profit) of the airline, not for the benefit of the passenger.

Delta also demanded that anyone flying from JFK in New York to the Netherlands would not be allowed on the aircraft without a negative Covid-19 test, even though the Netherlands at the time required only proof of vaccination. Just happened that a Covid-19 test space in the Delta-owned terminal, near the gate for the flight to Amsterdam, was able to provide a rapid test for a mere $200 per person. If you didn't get the test, you wouldn't fly. Oh, and the testing place occupied a vacant store previously used by a spa that went out of business. The rental revenue from the store area goes to Delta.

Always new ways to make money.

Art

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To: Art Bechhoefer who wrote (1618)7/28/2021 4:56:40 PM
From: Sam
   of 1757
 
Wow! Did Delta tell you in advance about that requirement?

re:
Delta also demanded that anyone flying from JFK in New York to the Netherlands would not be allowed on the aircraft without a negative Covid-19 test, even though the Netherlands at the time required only proof of vaccination. Just happened that a Covid-19 test space in the Delta-owned terminal, near the gate for the flight to Amsterdam, was able to provide a rapid test for a mere $200 per person. If you didn't get the test, you wouldn't fly.

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