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   Technology StocksAll About Sun Microsystems


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To: alydar who wrote (64850)9/10/2009 12:01:48 AM
From: Charles Tutt
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I think the EU may have a tough time making a case. If they define the market narrowly as open source database systems, they have to deal with the low barrier to entry inherent in open source. If they define the market broadly as PC database software, then Microsoft becomes the elephant in the room. A still broader definition, such as database software generally, makes a myriad of other competitors significant.

JMHO, of course.

Charlie

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From: E_K_S10/19/2009 10:26:53 PM
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In 1986, Sun led the way for future tech giants
Did the market have the company's future pegged in the first month of trading?

marketwatch.com

From the article:"...Sun, Oracle Corp. and Microsoft Corp. all undertook IPOs within days of each other -- though Sun, the first out of the gate to go public, now appears be the first to be disappearing as an independent entity...."

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From: QwikSand10/20/2009 6:59:59 PM
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Current WSJ Bulletin as of 1400 PDT:

Sun Microsystems will eliminate up to 3,000 jobs as part of a
restructuring plan and in light of the delay in the closing of Oracle's planned $7.4 billion takeover.


--QS

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From: Sr K11/9/2009 10:14:12 PM
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Oracle rejects EU antitrust claims
By Richard Waters in San Francisco

Published: November 10 2009 01:52 | Last updated: November 10 2009 01:52

Oracle on Monday mounted a strident attack on Europe’s competition authorities as it confirmed that it had received an official objection from Brussels to its proposed $7.4bn acquisition of Sun Microsystems.

...

In a statement on Monday, however, Oracle claimed the case was founded on a misunderstanding. “It is well understood by those knowledgeable about open source software that because MySQL is open source, it cannot be controlled by anyone,” it said. “That is the whole point of open source.”

ft.com

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To: Sr K who wrote (64855)11/9/2009 10:27:06 PM
From: Sr K
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Oracle said in its statement that the database-software market is competitive, and that MySQL, as an open-source product, "cannot be controlled by anyone." Indeed, Amazon.com Inc. recently announced that it has developed its own version of MySQL for customers of its online services.

Oracle said it is confident it will ultimately win clearance of the transaction.

wsj.com

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To: Sr K who wrote (64856)11/11/2009 10:17:29 PM
From: Sr K
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Spotlight turns to SAP in Oracle, Sun debacle

German software maker 'disappointed' letter to Oracle CEO leaked to press

11/11 06:13 PM

...

SAP acknowledged in its statement that it has raised concerns about Oracle's $5.6 billion bid to buy Sun "with the U.S. Department of Justice and the European Commission as well as a number of other antitrust authorities throughout the world, and will continue to cooperate with these agencies in an open and transparent manner."

MarketWatch.com

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From: Sr K1/26/2010 5:13:17 PM
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...

Oracle has scheduled a five-hour Webcast, to detail its strategy for Sun, on Wednesday morning, most of which will occur at the same time as Apple Inc.'s widely anticipated tablet launch. And while those two companies have vastly different audiences, one could speculate that Oracle is trying to keep a low profile, with Apple's expected tablet news guaranteed to dominate technology news headlines.

marketwatch.com

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From: QwikSand1/26/2010 11:23:23 PM
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An item on the current Wall Street Journal site says JAVA delisted itself from NASDAQ today, 1/26/2010.

I guess it's not going back up to 200 after all.

--QS

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From: Sr K8/1/2010 12:00:15 AM
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$200 Textbook vs. Free. You Do the Math.

By ASHLEE VANCE
Published: July 31, 2010

INFURIATING Scott G. McNealy has never been easier. Just bring up math textbooks.

Mr. McNealy, the fiery co-founder and former chief executive of Sun Microsystems, shuns basic math textbooks as bloated monstrosities: their price keeps rising while the core information inside of them stays the same.

“Ten plus 10 has been 20 for a long time,” Mr. McNealy says.

Early this year, Oracle, the database software maker, acquired Sun for $7.4 billion, leaving Mr. McNealy without a job. He has since decided to aim his energy and some money at Curriki, an online hub for free textbooks and other course material that he spearheaded six years ago.

“We are spending $8 billion to $15 billion per year on textbooks” in the United States, Mr. McNealy says. “It seems to me we could put that all online for free.”

The nonprofit Curriki fits into an ever-expanding list of organizations that seek to bring the blunt force of Internet economics to bear on the education market. Even the traditional textbook publishers agree that the days of tweaking a few pages in a book just to sell a new edition are coming to an end.

“Today, we are engaged in a very different dialogue with our customers,” says Wendy Colby, a senior vice president of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. “Our customers are asking us to look at different ways to experiment and to look at different value-based pricing models.”

nytimes.com

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To: Sr K who wrote (64840)1/5/2014 9:00:17 PM
From: Justinfo
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Apologies for digging up this old thread. But what are you referring too? Why would IBM not see losing SUN as a loss back then?

Considering how hard it has been for Oracle to turn around suns HW business, maybe IBM knew something about Hardware businesses.

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