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   Technology StocksAll About Sun Microsystems


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From: Gary1054/6/2009 7:08:11 AM
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Anyone buying today's dip?

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From: Arthur Tang4/6/2009 8:36:27 AM
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Have to wait for the company to put all the plans in place.

Probably sell into the short interest built up lately.

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To: Gary105 who wrote (64791)4/6/2009 9:59:52 AM
From: Mark O. Halverson
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I find it interesting that Sun, as of this moment, is quiet, quiet, quiet about the IBM failed takeover talks. If Sun regarded talks as irrevocably over, logically CEO would immediately be prominently reassuring customers and investors about Sun's future. So what is happening...?

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To: Mark O. Halverson who wrote (64793)4/6/2009 11:16:55 AM
From: alydar
1 Recommendation   of 64865
 
What is happening is that the Ponytailed CEO is wonderful at blogging and articulating his zen thoughts, but, when it comes down to actually building a profitable business or trying to sell a dying one, he is know wheres to be found. The Ponytail does not have a backup plan so I cannot see how JAVA was the one who imposed the restrictions on the deal. JAVA is cooked. As usual, the ones that get hurt from poor management are the employees, customers and shareholders. I doubt if this is positioning ploy by either company.

Maybe Oracle will pick up the company for a 2-3 billion and get a decent operating system to give away instead of a rebranded Redhat product.

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From: Arthur Tang4/6/2009 11:27:07 AM
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So far, just a regular day daytrading.

Typical volume for a few pennies each trade for a few hundred dollars profit.

But in a day for 36 trades, can make a nice living.

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To: alydar who wrote (64794)4/6/2009 2:14:53 PM
From: Mark O. Halverson
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According to street.com (see below)Schwartz was in favor of the acquisition, McNealy was opposed. I agree, it is most unlikely the talks breakoff was posturing or tactics. Nonetheless, IBM deal still a possibility, I think. We'll see. Best, Mark

Market Movers by Will Swarts (Author Archive)
3 Stock Picks: JAVA, MGM, DNDN

Merger Move Hurts Sun Shares
Investors sold Sun Microsystems (JAVA: 6.54*, -1.95, -22.96%) after weekend boardroom moves endangered a $7 billion merger with IBM (IBM: 100.65*, -1.57, -1.53%).

Sun’s board of directors rejected IBM’s formal offer on Saturday, which prompted IBM to withdraw its bid the next day, according to The Wall Street Journal. Sun shares plunged Monday on news of the deal falling through and problems between Chairman and Co-founder Scott McNealy, who opposes the buyout, and CEO Jonathan Schwartz, who favors the merger. The company declined to comment on the reports.

Analysts applauded the deal when it was unveiled March 17, though some saw it as an attempt by IBM to block competitors, rather than being fully ready to integrate Sun into the business.

Meanwhile, IBM appears to be in for a tough 2009, regardless if the deal goes through or not. Canaccord Adams analyst Peter Misek said IBM’s business computing services division could be in for a weak quarter. The group, which emphasizes services and software, rather than capital expenditures for new equipment, has been a critical part of the company’s steady showing even in the midst of recessionary cutbacks. Misek on Monday cut his rating on IBM from Buy to Hold. He kept his 12-month target price at $110 a share.

“The share price has performed well during a volatile bear market,” he wrote. “And while we continue to believe IBM is one of the more defensive names within the technology sector, the risk-reward level is more balanced with less than 8% return to our target price.”

Bottom Line: Hold
Betting on mergers is always risky.

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To: Mark O. Halverson who wrote (64796)4/6/2009 5:41:19 PM
From: Charles Tutt
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I can't help recalling that a few years back, Apple was on the skids and Sun tried to buy it. That deal fell through. Apple shareholders did pretty well.

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To: Charles Tutt who wrote (64797)4/6/2009 5:58:38 PM
From: Jatin Kadakia
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I can't help recalling that a few years back, Apple was on the skids and Sun tried to buy it. That deal fell through. Apple shareholders did pretty well.

It was probably in the best interests of industry, apple shareholders and this country that the deal fell through. McNealy and ponytail would have destroyed the apple brand along with "Sun". What an arrogant bunch at Sun determined to run it in to ground.

I hope there is white knight lurking in the background. If not and if IBM walks away completely, next 12 months would mark an end of Sun era.

--JK

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To: Charles Tutt who wrote (64797)4/6/2009 9:20:56 PM
From: Mark O. Halverson
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I felt pretty good about Sun, that it was making progress, prior to the WSJ buyout announcement. If talks with IBM (or some other company, possibly) don't resume, my chief concern is the damage to Sun's customer relations caused by the takeover talks. Johathan will have his work cut out smoothing things over with Sun's customer base. On "water under the bridge" topic, I sigh when I recall the 3 billion that Sun squandered on Storage Technology. It would be most useful right now. Best, Mark.

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To: Mark O. Halverson who wrote (64799)4/6/2009 9:56:57 PM
From: Sr K
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Isn't the STK part what attracted IBM?

For a long time I haven't liked these WSJ early reports on mergers. Companies and boards should keep their mouths shut. Where are they getting these sources? Why doesn't the SEC investigate? Why doesn't the NYTimes investigate?

What happened to using code words and not telling anyone until the boards had approved it?

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