SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksMicroStrategy Inc. (MSTR)


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: lilbully who wrote (691)9/4/2002 11:25:59 PM
From: lilbully
   of 710
 
This is part of it...
Days before the Sept. 11 attack, an FBI field agent in Phoenix sent a memo to FBI headquarters relaying concern over Middle Eastern men training to fly jets at aviation schools. But the information was never formally evaluated. Earlier this summer, Minneapolis FBI field agent Coleen Rowley testified before a congressional committee about how hard it is to process information at the agency. Her office had also drafted a memo about a Middle Eastern man -- Zacarias Moussaoui -- who had enrolled in a flight school before Sept. 11, but the memos were never linked.

The agency's records are so voluminous, Rowley said, that they're nearly useless. Intelligence analysts sometimes call it drinking from a fire hose.

Analysts working the Pentagon war room are equally flooded with information. Sometimes they get one message a second, says U.S. Rep. Mark Kirk (R-IL), a former Naval intelligence officer.

"An analyst from South America would get 1,400 messages a day," Kirk tells Joyce. "There are huge vacuum cleaners in the sky sucking in information for the foreign intelligence agents, but sometimes we get so far behind in collecting information that we find it too late, as we did with Sept. 11."

The billions of dollars spent on homeland defense will inundate intelligence analysts with information: photos from satellites, intercepted e-mails, banking records. Someone -- or something -- has to separate the information from the noise. There's a growing industry to figure out the best solutions.

The government has created an Information Awareness Office at its Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to do just that. And researchers with the National Science Foundation are working with the CIA on systems that dig through mountains of information, looking for patterns.

But there is a danger to improving information gathering and analysis. Better technology will give the government more information -- about everybody. At the moment, laws such as the Federal Privacy Act limit how much personal information federal agencies can share with each other. But Ben Shneiderman, a computer scientist at the University of Maryland, warns that may change.

"The mood is somewhat shifted, and the feeling is, well, if one state agency collects certain data they should share it with another agency," Shneiderman tells Joyce. "In fact, the criticism of the FBI and the CIA was for not sharing."

The imminent danger is that the government's disorganized database system could actually get much better, according to many computer experts. Scientists are ready to fix the database, and money is on the way. What those experts worry about is whether the technology will outrun the public's ability to control it.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: lilbully who wrote (691)9/5/2002 2:56:20 AM
From: Toby Zidle
   of 710
 
I don't know why MSTR has been improving. I no longer follow the stock. SI doesn't even link a chart to this thread any more. (Perhaps that's because of the reverse split.)

Prompted by your question, I checked out the chart on StockCharts.com. Amazingly, MSTR may be about to form a cup-with-handle pattern.
stockcharts.com

You posted a very interesting article in msg #692. Yes, the federal government has always been at the toe of the learning curve when it comes to computer systems and system integration.

You can be talking about the CIA/FBI, the INS, Air Traffic Control, or the Postal Service. About the only branches that seem 'competent' are the military, NASA, and (oddly enough) the Weather Bureau (NOAA).

Perhaps this is because computer geniuses would prefer to work for a glamor Silicon Valley company rather than in a government bureaucracy. Or perhaps it's the fact that government bidding requirements place such onerous workforce conditions on bidders that the technology leaders just won't bid. The result is that contracts go to small companies that have neither the staffing nor the overall experience to come up with a truly first-rate computer system. Such stuff happens when the rules and regs are more important than the outcome of the project.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: lilbully who wrote (692)9/5/2002 10:33:19 AM
From: Howard C.
   of 710
 
That's just a sorry excuse. The information was there, clear as day. A government worker did not want to "rock the boat" and jeapordize his pay level. Then he tried to cover up his mistake. Then the lawyers would not let the CIA and FBI exchange information and look at the suspect's computer. The Axis of Evil includes Ourselves. Evil and Incompetence ride hand in hand. Just look at the results.

Anyway, MSTR is my only stock that is up today. Who knew?

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Toby Zidle who wrote (693)9/5/2002 10:49:22 AM
From: Howard C.
   of 710
 
Thanks for the compliment, I happen to work (contractor) for one of those three agencies that you mentioned in a positive way.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Howard C. who wrote (694)9/5/2002 8:47:31 PM
From: lilbully
   of 710
 
I had no intentions of sparking a political debate.
My only reason for posting that was my curiosity about how the so called "war on terrorism" might possibly profit this company.
My question still remains unanswered. Doesn't this company do data mining? Is that their main business? The government is investing in their infrastructure, of that I have no doubt.
Clearly... This stocks chart has demonstrated a change in character. I'm fishing for a reason why. Its not an accident when a troubled company goes up on triple average volume on a day like today. The NASDAQ got fairly well abused.
Thanks for the responses guys. I'll tell you what. If this chart is in a valid uptrend, there is a whole lot of overhead resistance on this baby!
Mike

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Howard C. who wrote (695)9/5/2002 8:49:43 PM
From: lilbully
   of 710
 
Hey look! Theres a chart for mstr! lol

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: lilbully who wrote (697)9/7/2002 11:55:16 PM
From: Toby Zidle
   of 710
 
What do you know? A chart!

What I see there is a double top without a breakout. A rather negative "M" formation.

I don't think I'd invest until either

1) a breakout above the double top. (P&F charts show those rather nicely. StockCharts.com, furthermore, annotates its P&F charts with Alerts.)

or

2) Confirmation that the bottom of the middle segment of the "M" holds support, in which case MSTR can fall into a "trading range" categorization for its movement.

If support at the mid-point low of the "M" (about $9.50) doesn't hold then I'm back to looking at other stocks for investment. MSTR then becomes an "avoid".

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Toby Zidle who wrote (698)11/20/2002 5:58:23 PM
From: Kid Rock
   of 710
 
Any stategies for shorting this POS?

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Kid Rock who wrote (699)11/20/2002 8:50:30 PM
From: Neenny
   of 710
 
OT

Grub

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Kid Rock who wrote (699)2/18/2004 11:58:39 PM
From: Kid Rock
   of 710
 
ok - noone had any strategies in Nov 02'(@17) - thankfully :)

its Feb 04 now, revenues are flat and under 200M yet this stock still has a $1B market cap

so I ask again to the 121 members that have this thread bookmarked, any strategies for shorting?

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10