SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Strategies & Market TrendsValue Investing


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: Investor2 who wrote (56693)1/19/2016 12:03:38 AM
From: Paul Senior
   of 69639
 
Hi I2. XOM/CVX: If oil stays down, they're either expensive or fair-valued. If oil moves up, maybe to $60 or more this year, then the stocks are cheap now. I am avoiding both companies at current price. Too tough for me to value--I defer to others on the thread who may see the outlook or these companies more clearly.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Paul Senior who wrote (56698)1/19/2016 4:14:21 AM
From: Touching
   of 69639
 
Abstracts from CF Q3 2015 on China:
---------------
Yeah, Vincent, let me kind of step back and talk about where we sat in 2012 when we made the decision to move forward with these projects. At the time, the forward curve was above $5.50 per MMBtu and that dramatically changes what the profitability of the output of these plants are. We did anticipate at that time based on the number of projects that had been announced and were in flight in Middle East, North Africa, as well as in China that kind of 2016 was going to be sort of a low point in the pricing curve. [...]

Chinese government devalued their currency during the third quarter. This devaluation, along with less expensive coal and ocean freight, help to push the international price of urea lower.

However, over the last few months, China has been reducing its exports. This decline has also been evidenced in the last three India urea tenders, which saw lower Chinese producer participation. Additionally, over the last few weeks, several large curtailments of urea facilities have been reported in China. [...]

While all these factors have led to a depressed pricing environment, we believe pricing is beginning to stabilize and that we have reached the seasonal floor of anthracite coal-based production in China at around $250 a ton delivered to the U.S. Gulf.[...]

I hope in 2016, we see return to Brazil [...]. So the 5 million tons of demand out of Brazil will probably be there and a return to some other markets. And I don't think that Chinese anthracite coal producer can continue at their current rate of production and we're seeing that reflected in operating rates in China.

And so, when you look at the 13.6 million tons exported last year, estimating 12 million tons this year, I expect that to slowly wind-down to probably an acceptable rate in the 5 million to 10 million tons longer term, which sets up available options for CF.

The other point, Joel, that I'd like to bring up is, as you sort of rewind the clock, you can look forward and see there was this ongoing tail of new plants that were coming online in China and Middle East, North Africa. That sort of tail, by the time we get to the middle of next year, is largely empty from there going forward. The U.S. plants will be online. Most of the Chinese plants will be completed and operating. So there has been this pretty significant build that's left this overhang of capacity and the marginal stuff swings on and off depending upon where price is. And, as you say, it sort of puts a relative cap on where prices get to before the marginal producer swings back into production again.

The global nitrogen demand is growing about 2% per year and that requires four to five world-scale ammonia complexes being brought on every year just to meet what the demand is. And so, as we look forward and the existing capacity gets absorbed into the marketplace, any kind of rebound in the Chinese economy with attendant increase in coal prices there, all of a sudden makes this marketplace shift into a different dynamic from a really over-heavily supplied position to one where there is some price appreciation. So, we think this is kind of the tough area to get through, but even at these ranges we're highly, highly profitable. And as we get into a recovery mode, we'll participate in that very, very nicely.

Yeah, when you look at China, every year is an anomaly. When you see the numbers ramp-up from zero tons, 2 million tons, 4 million tons, 8 million tons, 13 million tons, and so, we're modeling this year coming down to 12 million tons. I think based on – again, cost structure market optionality and how we see the market developing, I think, that's a declining run rate. But I'm not comfortable giving you a specific number.

---------------

It looks like they did their homework and given the strong financial position of the company they have room for coping a low point in 2016. They anticipated it, they are not reacting to unexpected economic shifts. I think the Q4 call will set the tone for the next decision on CF.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: bruwin1/19/2016 5:06:44 AM
1 Recommendation   of 69639
 
Yeah, well, ... 'micro', 'macro', 'shmakro', 'shmikro', ... whatever....

The thing is, you buy a Resource based company, you know that there's a built in RISK of the international price of its commodity taking a dive or, hopefully, a surge.
That's the thing about (a)'COMMODITY TYPE BUSINESSES'.

Management of EXXON, BP, Mobil, VALE, etc.., however competent and experienced, can do very little when world oil or iron ore prices fall through the floor from $100 to $30, etc ....

However, people will still be buying and drinking Coke, Pepsi, Budweiser, etc..,
They will still be brushing their teeth, shaving, etc.., etc.., via P&G/Gillette, Colgate, etc...,
They will still have their kids and even adults watching Disney, etc.., etc...

In other words they will be still be buying from (b)'CONSUMER MONOPOLIES' long after we're all pushing up daisies.
Consumer Monopolies control the prices meted out to the merchants, so business moves along nicely. The "price fight" that takes place after that between merchants is their problem.

Yes, maybe, according to some, Buffett hasn't got his 'macro' right every time, but he sure as hell knows the difference between (a) and (b) above, and when to buy more of (b) when "Mr. Market" gets 'neurotic' and 'panic stricken' ....

"you pays your money and you takes your choice" ....

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Touching who wrote (56691)1/19/2016 12:18:41 PM
From: richardred
   of 69639
 
Thanks for the opinion. I believe Privately held Otter Box is a good gauge as a top competitor. Both this company and Otter Box have grown through acquisitions. I believe the cell phone protective case and glass market will be a good growth market going forward. (New & replacement market)
If the PE remains 11 or below. While margins and cash flow hold, or expand moving forward. IMO it should also increase the M&A speculative appeal of this company.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Elroy who wrote (56676)1/20/2016 12:14:02 AM
From: Shane M
   of 69639
 
Do you have any insights on why UAN is hitting new lows other than market madness?
Lots of new capacity coming online also. I'm a longer term CF holder so am following from that view, but things do move fast. CF presentations fairly convincingly argued that even with the expansions marginal production cost (imports) would have sufficiently high price, but the winds are blowing against. Commodity prices tanking means less reason for farmers to invest in fertilizer.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Shane M who wrote (56703)1/20/2016 3:51:58 AM
From: Elroy
   of 69639
 
Lots of new capacity coming online also. I'm a longer term CF holder so am following from that view, but things do move fast. CF presentations fairly convincingly argued that even with the expansions marginal production cost (imports) would have sufficiently high price, but the winds are blowing against. Commodity prices tanking means less reason for farmers to invest in fertilizer.

Thanks, someone else pointed out that the price of fertilizer seems to have had a bad drop in the past few months. I think lower oil prices also lower the cost of fertilizer manufacturing, not I'm not really sure on that.

So....if the business is really doing poorly, it should show up in UAN's Q4 numbers, right? Does fertilizer generally sell into a spot market price?

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


From: Paul Senior1/20/2016 11:09:47 AM
   of 69639
 
OT: Rough day today. Of the many, many, many stocks I own I only see four that are in the green right now (AN, ZMH, ALGT, SAVE - and these just slightly green.) Everything else is red or unchanged. Geez. It looks like early 2009 again.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


From: Grommit1/20/2016 11:39:48 AM
   of 69639
 
Been buying pref stocks lately. Today was AHT-A, yielding 12.8%, at $16.73 (my buy price). A lot of nice ones are below par now (STAG-B, CDR-B for example). I do not understand AHT-A recent price drop. Common has not dropped as it would on some general news.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Investor2 who wrote (56693)1/20/2016 1:15:20 PM
From: Wallace Rivers
1 Recommendation   of 69639
 
FWIW there has been more talk "on the Street" about CVX cutting its dividend than XOM. The screens I use (from my Fidelity web site) show CVX with a dividend payout ratio of 93% and XOM of 63% (as of 9/30/15). I've also seen the CVX CEO on TV saying the dividend is a very important priority, the implication being the company, in my mind, would cut only as a last resort. My screens also show CVX with a book value of $82 on 9/30, so it is trading below that figure, but again that is a moving target. XOM at about $41 as of 9/30.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


From: Graham Osborn1/20/2016 2:25:10 PM
   of 69639
 
There's been a good bit of discussion here on shipping companies. One, SSW, I've been doing some credit forensics on since the company had apparent grown in rev and tangible book through 08-09 but the stock lost 3/4 of its value or so in a few months. I cannot locate any information that the company was in immediate danger of default. The issue seems more related to the fact that shipping companies have highly illiquid assets and can only fetch a fraction of the purchase price at fire sale (no surprises there). So I would say the tangible book figures for these and other heavy industrials are reflexive and should be treated with extreme caution.

Microcaps tanking along with the Russell on low volume today. I hold IEHC/ MKRS with orders to acquire TTLO. The puts on CAR, MDT, AGN, and F are offsetting some of this. I tried to buy puts on GS/ ETP today but this is a sellers market with all the volatility. A bit over 60% cash.

Good luck to all,
Graham

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)
Previous 10 Next 10