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Technology Stocks : Cree Inc.
CREE 80.070.0%Oct 4 12:00 AM EDT

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From: slacker7111/10/2019 8:22:16 AM
1 Recommendation

Recommended By
richardred

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EV's + 5G + Servers?


https://technology.ihs.com/610184/power-semiconductor-usage-in-data-centers-evolves-to-meet-power-efficiency-needs?utm_campaign=pc10030&utm_medium=social-network&utm_source=twitter&hootPostID=a404d0785087f92c6f387df035ef1184



For most data centers, the largest operation cost is electricity. In addition, many large operators are conscious of their environmental footprint as high energy users. These two factors drive DCs to seek ways to improve their energy efficiency. One means of mitigating this growing need for power is to improve the power conversion efficiency in data centers. This can take many forms including overhauling the power distribution architecture within the data center, including changing the point at which AC power is converted to DC, the DC bus voltages and DC conversion stages and the efficiency of the conversion stages at each of these processes. Efficiency is key – it is estimated that a 1% improvement in power conversion efficiency in all the world’s data centers would be equivalent to eliminating 4.6 nuclear power plants.


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This architecture has
provided a good balance of efficiency, load response and power density. However, the limits of this design are being tested with higher efficiency demands and faster dynamic load response leading to new architecture proposals. The first is to convert the boost PFC from a full bridge design to a totem-pole design. The totem-pole architecture uses only a half bridge input stage instead of full bridge followed by synchronous rectification diodes or MOSFETs. This eliminates one diode drop and provides power conversion efficiencies at high power up to 99% (up from 97.5% for the full-bridge design). However, high power levels are only achievable with this architecture when the totem-pole switches are implemented with wide bandgap semiconductors. These devices switch faster than silicon with almost zero reverse recovery loss and provide higher power densities than full bridge designs. We believe this design will quickly catch on, especially in high power applications and drive high growth rates for wide bandgap devices such as Silicon Carbide MOSFETs and Gallium Nitride transistors.
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