SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  For example, here is how to disable FireFox ad content blocking while on Silicon Investor.
Politics : Muslims Gone Mad

 Public ReplyPrvt ReplyMark as Last ReadFilePrevious 10Next 10PreviousNext  
To: GROUND ZERO™ who wrote (1088)1/4/2019 3:34:32 AM
From: James Seagrove  Read Replies (1) of 1111
 
When is a Beheading Not a Beheading?

When a Scandinavian girl gets decapitated by a mujahid in Morocco. Then it’s a “knife wound to the neck”.

If you’re a Swedish media snoid, that is.

Ingrid Carlqvist talked about all this in her interview last month. The following brief article discusses the same phenomenon. Many thanks to FouseSquawk for translating this piece from Nyheter Idag:

“Knife wounds to the neck”— SVT continues to minimize the beheadings

The most problematic thing about the beheadings in connection with the murders in Morocco is not the act itself, but that people spread the video on social media of what actually happened. That is how state SVT [Swedish state TV] Rapport may be summarized when they focus on the fact that it may be criminal to spread the beheading video, the incident that the public service outlet calls “knife wounds”.

Since the state SVT in TV texts, on the web, and in news broadcasts consistently refers to “knife wounds” when they report on the murders in Morocco, many private persons have chosen to post the bloody video that shows that the same work was beheadings. Now public service channels are putting a stop to videos that show what really happened, via a feature in SVT Rapport.

“A video that is said to show the murders has been spread on social media. But those who spread the film in Sweden may be guilty of a crime”. That is what the former prosecutor Sven-Erik Alhem told a TV anchor in SVT Rapport.

On the TV screen even in the text, “dissemination is illegal” appears. Further, Rapport shows a feature from Morocco where reporter Diamant Salihu repeats the minimization of what actually happened.

“The girls had knife wounds on their necks,” he says in the feature.

Those who want to show that SVT is wrong in their claim of “knife wounds to the neck”, and thereby spread videos that show what really happened, may risk several years in jail.

“If the crime is aggravated, it carries up to four years in jail and a minimum of six months,” says Sven-Erik Alhem in the feature.

In social media, several users say that the video is being spread just because the Swedish media, in particular the public service, consistently refuse to state that both women had their heads cut from their bodies. Nyheter Idag (News Today) reached out to SVT on Tuesday, but without results.

Report TOU ViolationShare This Post
 Public ReplyPrvt ReplyMark as Last ReadFilePrevious 10Next 10PreviousNext