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Politics : Actual left/right wing discussion

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To: Oeconomicus who wrote (8683)11/27/2010 1:25:05 AM
From: koan  Read Replies (1) of 10074
 
It is also quite rude (since you wish to use that tone) to use incorrect esoteria to make a distinction I never implied. I never posted a peep about classic liberalism, quite the opposite! So you should not have involved it in the conversation at all, let alone use it as a defense!

I said quite clearly I use the dictionary definition of liberals. Classical liberalism is a specific ideology.

Liberalism in general is much more broad and is more a state of mind:

thefreedictionary.com

1) "a. Not limited to, or by established, traditional, orthodox, or authoritarian attitudes, views, or dogmas; free from bigotry.
b. Favoring proposals for reform, open to new ideas for progress, and tolerant of the ideas and behavior of others; broad-minded.
c. Of, relating to, or characteristic of liberalism.

Will Durant's great introduction to the Greek portion of his Clasic work on the History of Civilzation says it best.

"The persistent effort to subordinate fancy to reason is the dominate quality of the Greek mind.

Ergo, Greek literature is modern, or rather contemporary, we find it hard to understand Dante or Milton, but Euripides and Thucydides are kin to us mentally and belong to our age.

This is because, though myths may differ, reason remains the same, and the love of reason, makes brothers of its lovers in all times and everywhere.

Also, while Plato undoubtedly influences modern American "liberals", neither he nor they are liberal in the classical sense in which the word applies to America's founding fathers. Liberal, from the Latin liberalis: pertaining to freedom.

ETA: It's also fairly obvious why modern, as opposed to classical, liberals are attracted to Plato. They tend to imagine themselves to be philosophers, governed by reason rather than desire, and thus entitled to be part of the Guardian class. However, modern liberals seem to misunderstand what it means to be a Guardian. I prescribe further reading.

<<Also, while Plato undoubtedly influences modern American "liberals", neither he nor they are liberal in the classical sense in which the word applies to America's founding fathers. Liberal, from the Latin liberalis: pertaining to freedom.

ETA: It's also fairly obvious why modern, as opposed to classical, liberals are attracted to Plato. They tend to imagine themselves to be philosophers, governed by reason rather than desire, and thus entitled to be part of the Guardian class. However, modern liberals seem to misunderstand what it means to be a Guardian. I prescribe further reading.
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