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From: dPaule1/31/2012 1:40:20 PM
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oled-display.net

If true, the best news I've heard in while. Hoping for official word soon.

dPaule

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From: slacker7112/2/2012 7:32:20 AM
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It is pretty clear that display companies are now scrambling for an OLED strategy.



Strategic Alliance for OLED Business
- Idemitsu and AU Optronics Corporation Agreed to Form Strategic Alliance -

February,2,2012
Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. (Head office: Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, hereinafter "Idemitsu") and AU Optronics Corporation (Head office: Hsinchu, Taiwan, hereinafter "AUO") agreed to start discussions for forming a strategic alliance in the field of OLED, which is expected to be used for next generation display. The strategic alliance includes mutual collaboration on OLED technology to develop high-performance OLED displays.
AUO is a global leader of thin film transistor liquid crystal display panels (TFT-LCD), and positively promoting the business of OLED displays.

Through this strategic alliance, both companies will strive to expand the OLED industry, enjoying the benefits of reciprocal synergy in the field of OLED.

Specifically, under this strategic alliance, Idemitsu will not only supply high-performance OLED materials, but also make other proposals including device structures to AUO. Accordingly, AUO will be able to accelerate growth of its OLED business of small-size OLED displays for smartphone and tablet, which is emerging as new growth area in the display industry, and that of large-size OLED displays for TV. Additionally, both companies will discuss the treatment of Idemitsu’s patented technologies related to OLED for display.
Idemitsu has been forming partnerships with mainly Sony Corporation through joint development, and LG Display Co.,Ltd. through a strategic alliance. Also Idemitsu has been forming partnerships with Mitsui Chemicals Inc. and Universal Display Corporation through joint development. Idemitsu will continue to promote our alliance strategy, and strive to strengthen our OLED material business.

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To: slacker711 who wrote (1301)2/2/2012 7:32:46 AM
From: slacker711
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Idemitsu specifically states that their phosphorescent materials are supplied by UDC.

idemitsu.com

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To: slacker711 who wrote (1302)2/2/2012 8:15:05 AM
From: slacker711
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Corning and Samsung Mobile Display Form New OLED Glass VentureNew business expands Corning's long-standing collaboration with Samsung


CORNING, N.Y., Feb 02, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Corning Incorporated GLW +0.54% and Samsung Mobile Display Co., Ltd. have signed an agreement to establish a new equity venture for the manufacture of specialty glass substrates for the rapidly expanding organic light emitting diode (OLED) device market. The new business will be located in Korea.

Combining Corning's Lotus(TM) Glass substrate technology and Samsung Mobile Display's OLED display expertise, this new entity will be well-positioned to provide outstanding product solutions for current and future OLED technologies, from handheld and IT devices to large TVs and beyond.

The newly formed entity will supply OLED backplane glass substrates for Samsung Mobile Display, as well as for the broader Korean market.

According to a recent NPD DisplaySearch report, OLED technology advanced rapidly in 2011, setting a trend that is forecasted to continue through this decade. They estimate that OLED display revenues will exceed $4 billion in 2011 (approximately 4% of flat panel display revenues), and will reach more than $20 billion (approximately 16% of the total display industry) by 2018.

Samsung is playing a leading role in this emerging market through its Galaxy mobile device products and Super OLED TV technology introduced in January at the International Consumer Electronics Show. Corning's ongoing advanced glass technology development includes a strong focus on high-performance displays. Most recently, this focus has been demonstrated through Corning's new Lotus(TM) Glass substrates, which deliver the higher processing temperatures and improved dimensional stability needed to produce the new high performance displays.

"Samsung Mobile Display has led the global display industry by constantly seeking innovations and challenging current technologies' limits. We are confident that combining our business powers with Corning's technology leadership will deliver greater value to our clients," said Soo In Cho, Samsung Mobile Display's president and chief executive officer.

"Corning and Samsung have a long and successful partnership in the display industry, dating back nearly 40 years to the early days of television," said Wendell P. Weeks, Corning's chairman, chief executive officer, and president. "The strength of our business relationship is built on Corning's ability to develop and make high-technology glass with the key attributes that enable Samsung's next-generation displays. Together, we have led the evolution of displays -- from the high-growth years of CRT, to our current successful business supplying world-leading substrates for today's high-definition LCD TVs, and now to the launch of this important new venture to advance OLED technology," Weeks stated.

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To: dPaule who wrote (1299)2/2/2012 10:49:04 AM
From: slacker711
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I'm hoping that delay is due to the need for a longer term, more in-depth contract. However, it also comes to mind that the companies might be at some sort of loggerhead.


A big reason why we dont have a LG deal is that companies cant really use the Samsung deal as a blueprint. The large licensing fee combined with minimum materials sales only works because we have some idea about Samsung's likely OLED sales over the next few years. There is no way to project what LG might sell.


PANL is likely (hopefully?) trying to put a royalty deal in place. That still wont be easy but the fact that LG needs PANL as a suppliers puts them in a great position.

Slacker

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To: slacker711 who wrote (1304)2/2/2012 12:30:35 PM
From: dPaule
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Hi Slacker,

With this post I will probably lose what little credibility I have left as an investor, but what the heck, it had to happen sooner or later. :-)

With regard to the LG negotiations I've wondered how much of a disadvantage UDC is at, if any, due to what I'll call "nationalism". It has often intrigued me that the two leading firms in the OLED arms race are both South Korean. And I wonder how much information is shared between LG and Samsung, if not directly, then through the South Korean government?

The best analogy that I can come up with in support of my little conspiracy theory is the NFL. Each team is fiercely competitive on the field, yet it is in the best interest of all teams to share financial information and resources (i.e. TV contract revenue) in order to ensure that all teams survive, if not flourish.

So, might the South Korean government be involved in the negotiations either directly or indirectly? Any chance that LG knows exactly what is in the Samsung contract? And if UDC were to suspect this, what recourse would they have? Lawsuit? Cave in? Stand firm and hope that the market forces LG's hand at some point? I wish I were a fly on the wall.

OK. Job well done. Credibility = 0. Time to sign off.

dPaule

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To: dPaule who wrote (1305)2/3/2012 10:25:21 AM
From: slacker711
1 Recommendation   of 3908
 
With regard to the LG negotiations I've wondered how much of a disadvantage UDC is at, if any, due to what I'll call "nationalism". It has often intrigued me that the two leading firms in the OLED arms race are both South Korean. And I wonder how much information is shared between LG and Samsung, if not directly, then through the South Korean government?


Over the years, the South Korean government has certainly taken an interest (and opposition) to royalty payments made to Qualcomm so I could see some interest in the agreements with PANL. Would the agreements be shared among rivals? I have no idea, but certainly LG and Samsung are fierce competitors in every sense of the word.


How much does it matter though? LG cant use the same agreement since the chemical purchase requirements would likely dwarf their needs. I might think differently if PANL had managed to get a regular royalty agreement but I do think Samsung's agreement was a one-off occurrence. LG and PANL will need to hammer out an agreement based on their views of PANL's patent strengths and the risks that they are willing to take in litigation.

I think they'll get a contract done. LG Display is becoming more and more bullish about OLED's in their communications to investors. I think they will find their way to an agreement rather than risk having to switch chemical suppliers and also taking the risks of litigation.

Slacker

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To: slacker711 who wrote (1306)2/4/2012 11:38:53 AM
From: slacker711
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A very thorough look at the overall OLED industry from a Korean brokerage.

messages.finance.yahoo.com


Slacker

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From: slacker7112/4/2012 10:05:24 PM
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I'm not sure if this is real or even how useful it will be, but Samsung has been promising a flexible display.

phonandroid.com




Galaxy Skin, the first flexible smarphone Samsung just fuiter. Is it or not the Galaxy S3?While Samsung announced a few days ago his decision not to present the long awaited Samsung Galaxy S3 at the MWC 2012, but during a special event to be held a few months later just before the launch of the smartphone, here that just fuiter site Xda.cn the first Samsung smartphone flexible range belonging to the Galaxy Skin .



Is it the Galaxy S3 or not? Impossible to say since no one knows absolutely nothing about this new smartphone Galaxy Skin apart from that it was expected in the first half of the year. So the only thing we can say about it, it's totally revolutionary technology that embeds that should make more than one manufacturer envious of Samsung that comes to prove that he still had several steps ahead of the competition.



In any case it has only one forward, learn more about this Galaxy Skin whether or not the Galaxy S3.

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From: slacker7112/7/2012 11:12:48 AM
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Engadget loves the Galaxy 7.7....only problem is the price.

Nice to see that we are finally seeing the benefits of reduced power consumption show up in real world testing (possibly using green?).

engadget.com

Display and sound



The contrast here is so deep, and the viewing angles so wide, that other tablets' screens look washed-out in comparison.Remember how we said 7.0 Plus owners shouldn't feel too resentful of the 7.7's build quality? Yeah, well, that statement didn't include the 7.7's 1280 x 800, 197 pixel-per-inch screen. As it happens, this is the first Galaxy Tab to rock a non-pentile, Super AMOLED Plus display, and man, is it a winner. We could tell you it's vibrant, stunning and breathtaking, but even that wouldn't quite do it justice. The contrast here is so deep, and the viewing angles so wide, that other tablets' screens look washed-out in comparison. By itself, for instance, the 7.0 Plus' display is plenty bright and pleasant to look at, but place it next to the 7.7 and the transition is about as jarring as moving from the Transformer Prime to the Ainovo Novo7 (check out our comparison gallery toward the end if you think we're exaggerating). The Super AMOLED Plus panel represents a clear step up from most other tablet displays, which sadly haven't received the same level of tender lovin' care as their smartphone cousins.




snip.....................................................................................


Battery life

The 7.7's 5,100mAh battery is rated for up to 10 hours of video, but in a rare twist, we managed to squeeze out more runtime than that. Much more. All told, it lasted a staggering 12 hours on our video looping test, even with WiFi on and the brightness fixed at 50 percent (3G was disabled). That makes it the longest-lasting tablet we've ever seen. Not the longest-lasting 7-incher, mind you, but the longest-lasting tablet -- one with enough juice to trample the iPad 2's long-standing record by an hour and a half. The 7.7 also has a battery-saving mode, so presumably you could push past that 12-hour-mark -- you know, in case you need your tablet to stay alive through more than just a roundtrip flight from New York to LA.

What's insane, of course, is that this tablet also happens to be one of the thinnest we've seen.
If Samsung can build a tablet this slim without skimping on battery life, what's Toshiba's excuse? Or Motorola's? In a way, the 7.7 reminds us of the Droid RAZR Maxx, a phone we reviewed just last week: we recommend it in its own right, but we also like to think it could be a harbinger of other long-lasting devices to come.

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