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To: Sector Investor who wrote (495)7/5/2000 4:14:35 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6947
 
Correction. The article was from the New York Times not WSJ.

OT to akmike. SI PM's are not working right now, but the answer is yes.

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To: Sector Investor who wrote (496)7/5/2000 5:06:25 PM
From: Roy F
   of 6947
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PRESS RELEASE

Contact: Alice Andrews
Director, Corporate Communications
401-847-3327


KVH, Crossbow Partner on Fiber Optic Project
Gyros for Next-generation Inertial System Valued at $1 Million

Middletown, RI, July 5, 2000 ¾ KVH Industries, Inc. (NASDAQ:KVHI) and Crossbow Technology, Inc., are collaborating on a project that will combine KVH’s high-accuracy fiber optic gyros (FOGs) with Crossbow’s dynamic measurement unit (DMU) technology to create next-generation systems for the communications, navigation and defense industries. An initial FOG order from Crossbow has a potential value to KVH of $1 million, with completion of the order contingent upon a new design meeting certain performance criteria. The next-generation inertial system is being designed to replace mechanical gyro systems. KVH and Crossbow also have enacted a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will enhance the marketing of each company’s products.

“Consistent precision performance, durability and cost were the criteria against which we measured the KVH FOGs that we have tested to date, and they were winners in all categories,” said Mike Horton, president of Crossbow. “We believe the FOG that KVH is developing for us will be ideal for further enhancing our product performance and ensuring that we meet the exacting standards of all our customers.”

Under the terms of the agreement, KVH and Crossbow will collaborate on selected large-scale projects or mutual product development with significant potential to revolutionize the inertial navigation market and achieve sales in their respective markets. Crossbow, a leading producer of embedded measurement sensor and control subsystems, selected the KVH FOG for the superior performance it provided in Crossbow’s inertial measurement units. KVH FOGs significantly improve accuracy in dynamically measuring angular rates. In each DMU, three FOGs are integrated with three axes of Crossbow’s accelerometers. The combination of rate and acceleration data results in a highly accurate, six degrees of freedom measurement sensor.

-more-
“Crossbow is the leading producer of embedded measurement sensor and control subsystems, and we are pleased that our fiber optic gyro has met their stringent standards,” said Martin Kits van Heyningen, KVH president and CEO. “We believe that our collaboration in integrating KVH FOGs into their systems will result in a superior product and further enhance the reputation each company has established for quality and reliability.”

KVH offers a FOG product line for a range of commercial and military applications, with select systems designed to meet or exceed rigorous military standards. In addition to Crossbow’s DMU applications in antenna stabilization, precision farming, UAV/ROV in-flight control, vehicle testing, flight control and smart munitions, KVH FOGs are used in autonomous vehicles, various stabilization systems, and turret stabilization.

Crossbow integrates silicon micro-electro-mechanical systems technology with its digital signal processing software architecture to create unique, low-cost acceleration and motion-sensing products for the heavy equipment, aerospace, medical, and commercial industries. The company was founded in 1995 and is based in San Jose, California.

KVH uses its proprietary autocalibration, sensor and fiber optic technologies to develop and market a range of products, from mobile satellite communications systems for land and sea to navigation systems for military and commercial applications. The company has its headquarters in Middletown, RI, and additional offices in Illinois, Florida and Denmark.
###



This press release contains certain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. The actual results realized by the Company could differ materially from the statements made herein. Factors that might cause such differences include, but are not limited to, a failure to develop fiber optic gyros that meet performance criteria, declining demand for inertial navigation systems, non-completion of the contract and the emergence of competing products and technologies. This release should be read in conjunction with the company’s Annual Report on Form 10K dated March 27, 2000, which is available from the company’s Corporate Communications Department.

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To: Roy F who wrote (497)7/5/2000 6:03:12 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6947
 
Some information on Crossbow Technologies. Crossbow is into some interesting stuff, as you will see. This should be very beneficial to KVHI.


Their web site: xbow.com



Links to product literature

tzogon.com

Article on sensors (Crossbox in list of companies)

frost.com

This one is interesting.

sensorsmag.com


Lots of links here to surf when time (and interest) permits

equipment-reliability.com


Interesting article: Measure a Vehicle’s Dynamic Motion

tmworld.com

"Imagine shoes that beep when you are overrotating, golf clubs that yell "Slice!" when you are about to slice, or even juggling balls that can teach you how to juggle."

media.mit.edu

And other links:

viaweb.com

Reference about 4/5 of the way down this link

ednmag.com


analog.com

xbow.com

emsto.com

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To: david james who started this subject7/10/2000 6:02:47 PM
From: Roy F
   of 6947
 
Sportvision Puts KVH FOG in the Game
For NFL, College Football Broadcasts

Middletown, RI, July 10, 2000 – In the very near future, fiber optic gyros (FOGs) from KVH Industries, Inc., (NASDAQ:KVHI) will be playing a role in positioning the yellow first-down line that television viewers see during NFL and college football games. Sportvision, Inc., the leader in sports media technology, has selected KVH’s fiber optic sensors to enhance stabilization of the virtual first-down line that is electronically created and then seemingly painted on the field by Sportvision’s Emmy award-winning 1st & Ten™ system during televised games.

To counteract the effect of stadium vibrations on 1st & Ten’s multiple cameras and maintain accurate positioning of the televised first-down line, the system continually monitors movement and adjusts the line accordingly. Data indicating the direction and degree of camera movement is fed continuously into a Sportvision computer that calculates how the first-down line must be shifted to compensate for the motion. For television viewers, the clearly visible first-down line appears to be stationary on the field, just like the actual white yard lines.

KVH FOGs provide highly precise measurements of camera movement, enhancing the positional accuracy of 1st & Ten computer-generated lines. With three FOGs on every camera documenting movement in each axis, the first-down line that 1st & Ten integrates into its video feed of the field is very precise. Sportvision is integrating the gyros into 1st & Ten systems to be used for ABC, ESPN and FOX football broadcasts this fall.

“In our tests, KVH FOGs consistently provided exceptionally fast and precise measurements of our system’s extremely small camera movements, which must be duplicated to give the appearance that our computer-generated line is actually ‘painted’ on the field,” said Bill Squadron, chief executive officer of Sportvision. “Integrating KVH FOGs with 1st & Ten further enhances our innovative technology, allowing us to match our line ‘shaking’ to the unanticipated stadium shaking that affects our cameras.”

“It is exciting to be working with Sportvision on what is a very visible and entertaining use of our fiber optic technology,” said Martin Kits van Heyningen, KVH president and chief executive officer. “This is just one example of the many behind-the-scenes OEM applications we have identified for our highly precise, reliable fiber optic gyros.”

KVH FOGs are highly reliable because they have no moving parts to wear out or require maintenance, and no cross-axis sensitivity to vibration, acceleration or shock. FOGs are true single-axis rate sensors, measuring the angular rotation about an axis perpendicular to a coil of optical fiber. The open-loop configuration consists of a broadband, solid state optical source and KVH’s proprietary E∙Core™ optical fiber components.

Sportvision, founded in 1998, develops technology-based enhancements for sports on the Internet, television and new media platforms. The company is headquartered in New York with research and development facilities in California and Kansas.

KVH Industries utilizes its proprietary fiber optic, autocalibration and sensor technologies to produce navigation and mobile satellite communications systems for commercial, military and marine applications. The company has headquarters in Middletown, RI, (USA) with offices in Illinois, Florida and Denmark.

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To: Roy F who wrote (499)7/10/2000 10:56:54 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6947
 
Roy, I posted this "thinking out loud" speculative post on Yahoo! about this release.

messages.yahoo.com

Then, re-reading the P/R, I see it includes college games as well. Since these games are all over the country on the weekends, that should involve a lot of cameras (and FOGs) don't you think? A hundred plus cameras maybe? More? Times three as three FOGs/camera.

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To: Sector Investor who wrote (500)7/10/2000 11:27:29 PM
From: akmike
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You are the "man" and you know that I am on your side-BUT don't try to convince me that this PR about the wonderful sport of football was really about serious revenue generation for KVHI and not about "look at all the wonderful uses that FOG can be put to". There are 4-5 camera crews for pro games and 3-4 camera crews for college games (unless I am out of date) Multiply cameras by games covered-`16 or so for NFL; 24 or so for NCAA (growing each year) with some overlap for crews between pro and NCAA. (as in MNF and ABC coverage of regional NCAA in the past) The product of this won't be all that meaningful even for a company as small as this compared to electrical current sensoring. It (the PR) is telling when viewed from the perspective that "I didn't even begin to imagine that use, what else is out there that I haven't thought of?"

P. S. congrats on post #500 ==in a couple of years we should be to 5000 or so, huh?

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To: akmike who wrote (501)7/11/2000 9:25:06 AM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6947
 
<<The product of this won't be all that meaningful even for a company as small as this compared to electrical current sensoring.>>

Absolutely. I wasn't trying to state that this was a large revenue producer - my envelope estimates came in between $250K and $1M. But this appears to be all in Q3 (or at least this year) because the P/R states "this fall". They only had $5M+ in Q1, so it is significant from a short term viewpoint.

<<It (the PR) is telling when viewed from the perspective that "I didn't even begin to imagine that use, what else is out there that I haven't thought of?">>

Yes. Apparently the applications are enormous. From my FOG plant tour, I had asked that question. Here is an excerpt from my post documenting the tour:

"I asked about other markets for sensors. Three that we discussed were trains, agricultural and "auto guided vehicles", but the general answer was "anywhere there can be a need to know positioning or to precisely measure angular rotation". "

I think that includes quite a lot.

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To: Sector Investor who wrote (455)7/12/2000 8:07:56 PM
From: MikeM54321
   of 6947
 
"Any application that has very stringent stability requirements, such as a large antenna pointing at a satellite, or a camera or other optical device mounted on a building or even a moving vehicle, can benefit from FOG technology. The FOG senses any "movement", however large or minute, and immediately feeds this information into a servo-mechanism. The servo counteracts the motion measured by the FOG, keeping the platform completely stable."

Sector- I somehow missed your tour notes when you originally posted it. I just went back and read them. Thanks for the detailed notes. The above excerpt is out of those notes.

During your tour, no one mentioned the FOG application with regards to fiberless optic access? As you recall, I mentioned to you that I thought, but was not certain, I had read of some kind of connection between FOG and the fiberless equipment players such as, TeraBeam, fSONA, Jolt, etc. I just don't remember who it was.

From your notes, it sure seems like this would be an excellent solution to the alignment problem lasers have. A problem caused by building sway. Have you run across any comments about FOG in this regard? Thanks. -MikeM(From Florida)

PS I'm not sure what the monetary value of the NFL contract would be, but how about a little bug in the lower right hand corner flashing, "First down marker provided by KVH Industries," once in awhile. That is where there might be real value.

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To: MikeM54321 who wrote (503)7/12/2000 10:48:17 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6947
 
<<From your notes, it sure seems like this would be an excellent solution to the alignment problem lasers have. A problem caused by building sway. Have you run across any comments about FOG in this regard? Thanks.
-MikeM(From Florida)>>

Mike, I had mentioned this on the Yahoo! thread a couple of times. I also had written I/R about this and was promised a reply, but have not yet received it. I just sent off a "2nd request".

Thinking conceptually about the building sway problem, wouldn't you have to have stabilization on both the transmitter and receiver, as both can sway in different ways at any given instant?

What an enormous potential market this could be!

I also had mentioned to I/R the possibility of having the TV stations credit KVH as they certainly are going to talk about the new technology on the air.

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To: Sector Investor who wrote (504)7/13/2000 7:32:50 AM
From: MikeM54321
   of 6947
 
Sector- Seeing that the beam is two-way, I would say yes. If a FOG solution was used, it would seem to have to be on both buildings.

There is an alternative that the laser players offer to the sway problem. It's one of making the beam larger and diffused. But seems like this defeats the purpose of a laser beam? So I don't quite understand it. Maybe it's a matter of economics. Either pay to keep it stabilized, or pay for it in terms of bandwidth by diffusing the beam.

OR maybe, FOG is so new, it just has not been presented as an idea to the fiberless optic players yet? That's the one KVHI investors hope for. -MikeM(From Florida)

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