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To: dvdw© who wrote (433)4/27/2000 3:40:00 PM
From: Roy F
   of 6935
 
Re: In flight access. Posed the question to Alice at KVH IR. Her response:

We are not targeting airplanes at this point in time, but the announcement by
Boeing validates our own prediction that this market is huge and it will further
increase demand (if on a plane while I'm flying, why not in my car?). This will
drive a more-rapid development of the necessary services and satellite
capacities that need to be in place for our mobile antennas.


Regards,

Roy

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To: Roy F who wrote (434)4/28/2000 5:04:00 PM
From: dvdw©
   of 6935
 
BP...Thread...sorry about my post below. I commented on the Boeing deal without having any knowledge of it's specifics.

My Post was a generalized response to a Potential which has been clarified by specifics.

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To: dvdw© who wrote (435)4/30/2000 12:27:00 AM
From: Jim O'Connell
   of 6935
 
Somewhat OT but interesting
globetechnology.com

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To: Jim O'Connell who wrote (436)5/1/2000 2:18:00 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6935
 
I posted this on Yahoo!

post.messages.yahoo.com

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To: david james who wrote ()5/4/2000 11:01:00 AM
From: Roy F
   of 6935
 
KVH Satellite TV Antennas Play Starring Role For Entertainment Coaches of America
May 4, 2000 10:41 AM Eastern Time
MIDDLETOWN, R.I.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 4, 2000--Professional entertainers throughout North America are applauding the decision by Entertainment Coaches of America, Inc., to install TracVision(R) LM satellite television systems from KVH Industries, Inc., KVHI on all of its custom coaches. Entertainment Coaches is the largest provider of prestigious luxury coaches to professional entertainers who lease the custom-designed vehicles for their performance tours throughout North America. With a TracVision LM on board, the entertainers are themselves entertained and informed even while their coach is on the road to the next performance.

TracVision LM provides the link to live satellite television and music broadcasts, delivering a broad range of direct broadcast satellite (DBS) entertainment and news with the fastest acquisition time of any automatic system on the market. The completely automatic system requires no user input to rapidly and accurately locate, acquire and track channels from DISH(TM) Network or DIRECTV(R).

"We find the TracVision LM is more reliable, has a quicker response and offers better reception than other systems," said Jerry Calhoun of Entertainment Coaches. "Our customers are world-renowned professionals in the entertainment industry who depend upon our coaches for luxury accommodations so they can relax between appearances and on the road. Prior to KVH introducing the TracVision LM, we were unable to meet their requirements for a high-quality, real-time broadcast system that they could access any time, anywhere. To date, we have installed the KVH system on 100 coaches and expect to install them on about 100 more new vehicles we are converting."

TracVision LM is an effective, reliable and affordable system that maintains satellite contact in mobile environments by sensing vehicle motion and automatically adjusting the antenna position. The proprietary sensor and software technologies KVH has incorporated into TracVision LM function automatically to acquire satellite contact, maintain pointing with 1(Degree) accuracy and actively track satellite signals at rates exceeding 30(Degree) per second. The flush-mount antenna dome measures 31" x 14.5" (79 cm x 37 cm), weighs about 33 pounds, and is easily installed on RVs, motor coaches, trucks and vans pre-wired with power and RF cables.

With its recent introduction of the TracVision SA, a low-cost system for stationary use only, KVH now offers vehicle owners superior products for both stationary and in-motion applications, and the flexibility of an optional upgrade when their needs change. TracVision SA is a cost-effective replacement for fold-down antennas that RV and truck owners report didn't stand up well to the elements, and it offers the same high-quality communications as the KVH mobile system.

"Entertainment Coaches of America has earned the Performance Magazine Readers Poll Award for 'Coach Company of the Year' in 7 out of the last 10 years," said Jim Dodez, KVH vice president of marketing and sales support. "They have established a reputation in the discriminating entertainment community for providing first-class transportation, and we are very pleased that our TracVision LM met their strict standards for equipping the coaches that they customize."

Since its founding in 1978, Entertainment Coaches has grown to include full conversion and maintenance facilities, a paved landing strip and guest lodging on 1,600 acres in Leesburg, Florida. It offers a variety of coaches and planes for lease, all equipped with the most advanced and plush interiors. The company stations its coaches all across the country for rapid access.

KVH Industries, Inc. manufactures and markets digital navigation systems and mobile satellite communication products for use in commercial, military, and marine applications. The company's headquarters are in Middletown, RI, and additional offices are located in Hoersholm, Denmark, Tinley Park, Illinois, and St. Petersburg, Florida.



CONTACT: KVH Industries, Inc. Alice Andrews Director, Corporate Communications (401) 847-3327


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To: Roy F who wrote (438)5/4/2000 8:39:00 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6935
 
Roy, see my post on Yahoo! <g>

post.messages.yahoo.com

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To: Sector Investor who wrote (439)5/5/2000 7:43:00 AM
From: Roy F
   of 6935
 
...and my response:

post.messages.yahoo.com

FWIW, I posted the PR as soon as it showed up on MSInvestor(usually the fastest). I didn't get the e-mail from Alice till later in the day.

Regards,

Roy

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To: Roy F who wrote (440)5/5/2000 8:13:00 AM
From: robert b furman
   of 6935
 
It wasn't me either.But I sure do like their work!!! HEHEHE


Bob

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To: robert b furman who wrote (441)5/5/2000 8:18:00 AM
From: Roy F
   of 6935
 
Mornin', Bob.

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To: Roy F who wrote (442)5/6/2000 4:19:00 PM
From: Sector Investor
   of 6935
 
This is from the TMF KVHI thread. I'll repost it here and on Yahoo!, and, since links expire, I will also post the text.

cbs.marketwatch.com



The sky's the limit
Global positioning satellite use expected to take off

By Kristen Gerencher, CBS MarketWatch
Last Update: 7:40 PM ET May 2, 2000

WASHINGTON (CBS.MW) -- When President Clinton descrambled a satellite signal for civilian use Monday night, the accuracy range for pinpointing a location on Earth shrank from a football field to a tennis court.

It may sound like splitting hairs, but the difference is likely to bring billions of dollars in productivity gains, location-based e-commerce, and savings from better management of mobile assets, experts say.

Taxpayers and businesses who rely on the U.S. government-owned constellation of 28 global positioning satellites (GPS) for activities ranging from hiking to fleet management can now receive satellite-based navigation, positioning and timing that's 10 times more accurate than before.

For years, the U.S government degraded the signal, keeping readings to within 100 meters of a location. That wide range has caused problems navigating where multiple highways run parallel and identifying accident scenes in time to save victims.

Why now

Under a protocol known as selective availability, the military aimed to keep the equipment from being used by terrorists. By moving to a localized control system where the military can instead selectively deny service, worldwide GPS users will be able to obtain refined readings without threatening security, said Jason Kim, spokesperson for the InterAgency GPS Executive Board.

"You're going to get 10 to 20 meter accuracy with your basic off-the-shelf Wal-Mart receiver for like $100," Kim said. "That lowered cost barrier will allow GPS to be used in many applications where it's not right now."

The government likely was motivated by competing commercial applications being developed in other countries and a Federal Communications Commission mandate known as E-911 that calls for cell phone makers to provide location information for use in emergencies, said Tim O'Neil, an industry analyst at Wit Soundview in New York.

To be sure, GPS is one of a handful of technologies jockeying for dominance in the positioning business. Companies also are testing terrestrial-based systems such as radio-frequency fingerprinting, angle-of-arrival and time-of-arrival, O'Neil said.

"What's been missing in artificial intelligence is location," he said, noting the growth potential for personalized advertising. "The technology is available, and giving a better degree of specificity is only going to enhance the ability to get the right content to the right person in the right place."

Boon for business

Secretary of Commerce William Daley compared the new capabilities to the seeds of Silicon Valley.

"This move has the potential to do for GPS what the PC has done for computing, making this powerful information technology far more accessible and affordable to the broad public," Daley said in a statement.

The GPS industry's sales this year are projected to double to $16 billion by 2003, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Jonathan Lawrence, an automotive-technology analyst at Dain Rauscher Wessels in New York, puts the figure at $13 billion by 2005.

"I think it benefits everybody, especially in the safety and security field, because it will allow more accurate location to be delivered to emergency services if there is an accident," he said. "Drivers say that safety and security is the most important feature to them."

Even so, Lawrence said he doesn't expect a better navigation tool to set off an onslaught of purchasing. "I don't think it's going to be that big of an impact on the consumer side because I think most people's perception is that GPS is fairly accurate now," he said. "Even 100 yards is pretty good."

Another big brother?

At first glance, technology that conveys location information may rattle consumers worried about the potential for inappropriate surveillance, but GPS is a one-way broadcast, Kim said. There's no transmission of a person's location unless it's used in combination with a transmitter, he said.

While privacy is a legitimate concern, upgraded positioning accuracy shouldn't sound an alarm, said Charlie Trimble, chairman of Washington-based U.S. GPS Industry Council, a trade group comprised of manufacturers Rockwell (ROK: news, msgs), Honeywell (HON: news, msgs), Magellan/Orbital Sciences (ORB: news, msgs), Boeing (BA: news, msgs), and Trimble (TRMB: news, msgs), whose shares rose 4.9 percent Tuesday, closing at 32 1/4.

Trimble said consumers can control knowledge of their personal whereabouts by choosing to turn off their wireless devices. He said most GPS units don't have integrated two-way communications functionality yet, but those that do pose a familiar risk.

"It's certainly a concern with regards to who gets to look at the data which is coupled between a cellular telephone and a GPS receiver," Trimble said, noting it's a particular issue for mobile Internet use.

"I think the service providers are going to have to ensure their customer base some level of anonymity in much the same way that you're assured some level of protection when you use your credit card over the Internet."

O'Neil said the benefits of having GPS technology embedded in devices outweigh the risks. He projects that in five to eight years, 70 percent of Americans will have a cell phone, many of which will be "always-on."

"We will then know where every single human asset is as long as that human asset has the wireless device turned on," O'Neil said. "You'd have to be more proactive to protect your privacy in this instance."

Next step

Robert Peck, satellite communications analyst at Lehman Brothers in New York, said the enhancement will bring attention to two-way communication products coming to market with combined GPS and messaging, such as ORBCOMM, Leo-One and Final Analysis.

Those systems will advance GPS technology and allow for remote asset monitoring across the globe, he said, pointing to the ability to adjust the temperature of a refrigerated railroad car, for example.

Peck said he expects equipment producers like Trimble, Lowrance (LEIX: news, msgs), and Garmin to be direct beneficiaries.

"Having the equipment makers be able to add this extra functionality and having these systems coming out down the road doing this two-way stuff is the big win for consumers."

Kristen Gerencher is a personal finance reporter for CBS MarketWatch.

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