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From: aknahow10/3/2017 9:33:54 AM
   of 21342
 
Google seems to believe it's big and popular enough that it can wedge its foot in the door of the market, and at least take a piece of the high-end smartphone universe. But that's actually the easy part— the last Pixel was great, and HTC made it. The real reason to take everything internal is to be able to control and improve what comes after.Saying "we're a hardware company!" and actually becoming a successful one are two radically different enterprises, though. That HTC group Google just bought? They've made great phones for a decade, but thanks to some bad carrier-exclusivity decisions and a truly terrible marketing plan, its products stayed under the radar. (Meanwhile, Samsung's marketing department bought the radar and trained it to only recognize Samsung products.) The Pixel, which is a great phone, didn't exactly take the world by storm either. Google hasn't reported exact sales, but one estimate showed a million Pixels in the market; another said between three and five million. That's due in part to Google's total inability to keep the phone in stock—another downside of not managing your own hardware—but doesn't inspire much confidence. Either way, Greengart says, "it certainly hasn’t been a dominant player in the high-end of the market. It doesn’t play at all in one of the biggest markets, China. I can’t see Huawei or Xiaomi or Oppo being worried." Apple and Samsung haven't lost sleep either.

But Google has to try. As we've learned time and again, the best products come from companies that make both hardware and software, each working to optimize and improve the other. Samsung knows it; Apple knows it. As we enter the next phase of tech, where smartphones give way to smart watches and smart speakers and smart lightbulbs and smart cars, there's no room for too-big parts or inefficient software. The winners will be the companies who figure out how to do everything right: hardware, software, marketing, everything. Apple nailed it with phones, and became the richest company in the world. There's another chance coming.

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From: aknahow10/3/2017 9:58:57 AM
   of 21342
 

Définition de High Contrast Filter
High Contrast Filter (Panasonic)
La technologie High Contrast Filter, présente sur certaines TV Neoplasma Panasonic, est destinée à améliorer les résultats en contraste.

Les TV plasma équipées de cette technologie intègrent dans leur revêtement un filtre dont l'architecture permet :
  • de laisser passer une quantité plus importante de la lumière qui est émise par les cellules
  • de réfléchir la lumière environnante afin d'éviter qu'elle perturbe celle émise par la TV.

  • Ainsi, la technologie High Contrast Filter permet d'obtenir des images plus lumineuses et plus contrastées.

    Illustration de la technologie High Contrast Filter de Panasonic

    On retrouve le High Contrast Filter par exemple sur la TV Panasonic TX-P50ST60E.

    REMINDER

    SPD-Smart Contrast Enhancement Filter for Information Display

    Annax, a leading supplier of passenger information systems consisting of six companies in four countries (Germany, Switzerland, Austria and China), showcased another information-display related innovative application for SPD-Smart technology at InnoTrans. At their booth, Annax’s information display used an SPD-Smart contrast-enhancement filter supplied by Vision Systems. The functionality of the SPD-Smart filter brings more contrast to Annax’s information display, and facilitates reading the text on the screen.

    At InnoTrans, Annax exhibited an information display that included an SPD-Smart contrast enhancement filter supplied by Vision Systems – delivering greater contrast to the display, for improved reading.

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    From: aknahow10/3/2017 10:21:51 AM
       of 21342
     
    Annax’s information display used an
    SPD-Smart contrast-enhancement filter supplied by Vision Systems.
    I have problems imagining how VS would supply millions of contrast filters for smartphones.whoever makes them.

    Google's needs are far less than other producers and I suppose VS could contract out the process to a capable party.

    Ideas on how any of this might work or could not work?

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    From: Rancon5610/3/2017 1:47:44 PM
    1 Recommendation   of 21342
     
    Lots of rumors, and the junk still won't move.

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    To: aknahow who wrote (20743)10/3/2017 2:09:26 PM
    From: firstresponder
       of 21342
     

    That HTC group Google just bought?
    Here's their 2015 patent for a "portable electronic device" that includes a:

    ,,,switchable layer ... capable of being switched between a substantially opaque state and a substantially transparent state. The substantially opaque state prevents viewing of the optical element through the switchable layer and the substantially transparent state allows viewing of the optical element through the switchable layer.
    Utilizing the portable electronic device of the embodiment of the invention, the optical unit (image sensor or light emitter) is disposed behind the front panel. Additionally, in the substantially opaque state, the optical unit is hidden and invisible. Therefore, the aesthetic appearance of the portable electronic device is improved.

    The focus is on a:
    .. conventional portable electronic device (smart phone), which comprises a housing, a camera and a flashlight ...However, the camera opening and the flashlight opening may not be aesthetically pleasing when applied to the conventional portable electronic device and thus, decreases the attraction of the portable electronic device to consumers.

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    From: dimtint10/3/2017 6:41:11 PM
    1 Recommendation   of 21342
     

    An oldie, but a good reminder of how long some of these development cycles take. Since GM (along with everyone else) is headed into EVs.... will that be the breakthrough market..... 30 years ago, they cited the same need that SPD addresses today.

    newscientist.com


    To me, the killer apps are sunvisors, rear side windows and then dynamic glare control on infotainment screens. Sunroofs are just a gimmck AND windshields already use laminated glass. We're getting close, one more model with decent volume gets us to breakeven, but I doubt it's a sunroof that drives demand-- sun visors should do it.

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    To: firstresponder who wrote (20747)10/3/2017 7:10:02 PM
    From: aknahow
       of 21342
     
    Is it fair or correct to say that reading this patent one possible conclusion is that the patent applies to using "the switchable layer" not to making such a layer?

    ,switchable layer ... capable of being switched between a substantially opaque state and a substantially transparent state.

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    To: aknahow who wrote (20749)10/3/2017 7:40:15 PM
    From: N. Dixon
       of 21342
     
    "switchable" to me says LCD.

    ND

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    To: N. Dixon who wrote (20750)10/3/2017 8:02:22 PM
    From: dimtint
       of 21342
     
    I doubt LC exists that is clear enough in the 'clear state' to use in front of a camera lense--unless there is some post processing that can correct for the haze.

    The clearest LC that I have found is something like 15% haze vs 2% for SPD. We'll never see Dyed LC compete and win against SPD for museum cases....

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    To: aknahow who wrote (20749)10/3/2017 8:44:00 PM
    From: firstresponder
       of 21342
     
    Is it fair or correct to say that reading this patent one possible conclusion is that the patent applies to using "the switchable layer" not to making such a layer?
    I think so.

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