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To: Davy Crockett who wrote (47850)5/3/2012 8:19:22 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
AAPL is really banging hard against this strong support level based on volume by price. The more times it test this level the higher the probability it will break to the downside. The jury is still out technically for me due to the low volume, though fundamentally I support your conclusion for a downside move due to the lack of new products till the fall. A lot of the good news is already out there and the market essentially sold the news.


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To: The Jack of Hearts who wrote (47868)5/3/2012 8:24:39 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
It looks like yesterday's action on RLE.V triggered a stop loss for other traders as the volume accelerated today. Nice bounce off the 200 day SMA. and the support level by volume by price. Still not sure about the business model of this company due to their lack of success in their other core businesses, but I am watching it.



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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47874)5/3/2012 8:46:24 PM
From: The Jack of Hearts
   of 51182
 
I am trying to decide what to do with this one.. been trading around a core.. have a few bids in ...I gor in mostly around the mid 70s and some low 80s


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To: The Jack of Hearts who wrote (47875)5/3/2012 9:04:36 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
It looks like it has some pretty good support at that $0.90 to $1.00 level. A stop loss there would take you out with a profit.

I don't know their story, but given all the concern about weakness in commodities do they have enough money or cashflow to fund their cap ex budget without going back to the market? I think it is going to get harder to raise money in the current environment and I see banks raising their requirements to lower their risk to the sector accordingly.

It looks like there were profitable last year:

stockhouse.com
I think that is what is being priced into companies like BNP.TO even though they are profitable and generating decent cashflow currently.

A company like EPM on the other hand can fund the cap ex budget from existing cashflow so it has been less volatile.

The volume is really light on this stock, less than $1 million a day in value. It might be hard to get out so you need to either except a lower price than you would expect or have to get out over a few days. That is one of the tthings I hate about small cap, thinly traded stocks.


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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47876)5/3/2012 9:13:11 PM
From: The Jack of Hearts
   of 51182
 
They look pretty good.. finance.yahoo.com
I am concerned that I am being a bit too cute here but the depth shows a couple of big blocks and a huge one at 1.15 offered.. May just be someone in early taking profit.. They aren't really dumping it.. The other thought is that the 1.15 offer is really just to cap the price since there seems no lack of buyers in the 1.06-1.10 range it appears.. even on the big volume down day.. lots of funny stuff in junior land...

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To: The Jack of Hearts who wrote (47877)5/3/2012 9:52:37 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
Interesting comment from the analysts tonight on Market Call. He said he is see more and more of the gains coming from fewer and fewer sectors and that is a sign of a tired market.

He believes in seasonality in trading and essentially we have entered the period where commodity stocks don't do as well after the strong period from October to April.

He is essentially in defensive stocks for the summer.

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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47878)5/4/2012 10:06:22 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
Away next week traveling on business, updates will be sporadic.


Sell signal triggered on SP500. I expect one more down day before a bounce.



DOW stopped short of a sell signal.





Dow transports barely triggering a sell signal.





Finally have a sell signal on the COMPQ.




Short term sell signal within an intermediate up trend channel on financials. I would not be going short in a big way here as the intermediate up trend remains intact. Scalping a few points is fine. A big break down is not quite in the cards yet.



Gold still on a sell signal.


Energy still on a sell signal.




Russell small cap index on a sell signal as of today.



Sell signal on natural gas negated, but the buy signal is not flat due to the sideways movement after the gap up.


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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47879)5/4/2012 10:23:13 PM
From: robert b furman
   of 51182
 
Have a good week Johnny

Bob

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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47879)5/6/2012 6:48:52 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 

Death of the middle class:

Message 28126340

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To: Johnny Canuck who wrote (47881)5/6/2012 6:55:12 PM
From: Johnny Canuck
   of 51182
 
Could These Start-Ups Become the Next Big Thing?
When Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion last month, it raised a lot of eyebrows — and questions about which buzzed-about start-ups might be on track for similar success. There is no shortage of companies to choose from. The start-up scene is flooded with apps and services that are attracting users and backing from investors. But it can be hard to work out which companies are worthy of the kind of attention Instagram was receiving when Facebook came calling. Here is an inherently incomplete list of companies that have the potential to be a hit — whether because they’ve seen explosive user growth, or are attracting investors or a new demographic, or just because they have an unusual idea that seems to be taking off. Of course, any of these start-ups could become the next Pets.com. But they could also be the next big thing.

Imagine you are a venture capitalist on Sand Hill Road in Silicon Valley, and could invest in only one of these companies. Vote on which one you would choose.

Pinwheel
1%Voting is closed. See the results above..
You've already voted. Results are above..Vote
22 VotesPinterest

Two years after it hit the Web, Pinterest, a kind of virtual pinboard, is already the third-most popular social media site, after Facebook and Twitter. Users can “pin” images they find around the Web — of a wedding dress, say, or a tasty-looking dish — so that the images appear on their Pinterest pages. Other users can then click to visit the source of the image. Pinterest still has a business model to figure out, but investors are intrigued by the site’s demographics; women, who are big online shoppers, account for 85 percent of its traffic. Pinterest is on the verge of raising cash in a deal that would value it at more than $1 billion, according to people close to the company. Bill Nguyen, founder of Color Labs, which makes an app for sharing photos and video, noted that Pinterest was building a network of people organized by shared interests, rather than social connections. “That’s originally what we were trying to build, and it’s very powerful,” he said. “They could be as valuable as any tech company.”

.Vote
16 VotesTaskrabbit

It sounds like an unlikely concept — people letting Internet-sourced strangers rent out their spare bedrooms and park in their garages, or relying on them to run errands and perform simple chores. But several fast-rising start-ups are built on the idea that a new economy is being forged around “collaborative consumption,” where people share resources they already possess, like extra square footage or time, in exchange for a fee. TaskRabbit, a service that lets people find “rabbits” to perform tasks and run errands, is one rising star in this field. Airbnb, which lets people rent out extra bedrooms or entire houses, is already looking like a juggernaut and may give a lift to its peers. Other potential contenders in this category: Skillshare, which lets people teach workshops, and Getaround, for renting cars.

.Vote
9 VotesAirtime

Mark Veltman for The New York Times

Sean Parker, one of the founders of Airtime.

Not much is known about the latest venture from Sean Parker and Sean Fanning, co-founders of Napster, the infamous music-sharing service that shut down in 2001. The two men referred to their new company as a video-sharing site during an interview at South by Southwest, but the details are still under wraps. With the current funding frenzy around video-sharing apps like Viddy and SocialCam, it is clear that Silicon Valley sees video as the next frontier. Airtime has piqued the interest of Adam D’Angelo, one of the founders of Quora, who was an early investor in Instagram. “It could wind up being really, really intriguing,” he said.

.Vote
61 VotesSquare

Jin Lee/Bloomberg News

This mobile payments company is barely three years old and already has tens of thousands of merchants swiping credit cards using its little white attachment for cellphones and tablets, instead of a cash register. Jack Dorsey, one of the founders of Square, was also one of the founders of Twitter. Square is on track to ring up $5 billion in payments this year, and its numbers have venture capitalists scrambling to get their wallets out. Less than a year after raising $100 million in financing, the company is said to be raising a $250 million round that could nudge its valuation as high as $4 billion.

.Vote
47 VotesDropbox

Peter DaSilva for The New York Times

The founders of Dropbox: Arash Ferdowsi, left, and Drew Houston.

This file-sharing service solved one of the biggest headaches of our time: How do you access files, photos and music across a myriad of devices? Instead of jamming up our e-mail in-boxes, Dropbox made it possible to store our digital clutter in the cloud. It was a simple proposition with huge growth prospects. Last year, the service had 50 million users, up threefold from the year before. Steve Jobs tried to acquire the start-up in 2009 and, when that failed, introduced Apple’s competing iCloud storage service. Google introduced its own take on the idea, Google Drive, just last month. For the time being, Dropbox, and its investors, seem confident that the start-up can go it alone. Last October, it raised $250 million in a fresh round of funding that valued the company at $4 billion — or four Instagrams.

.Vote
7 VotesPath

Peter DaSilva for The New York Times

When Path was first unveiled in 2010, people scoffed at the idea of a mobile social network that only let users share with a limited number of friends. But as Facebook and Twitter have swelled in size, the appeal of privacy and sharing with an intimate few has begun to look much more attractive — to users as well as venture capitalists. Dave Morin, Path’s chief executive, has said that more than 2 million people have signed up for the service, and this spring, Path raised $40 million from financiers, pushing the company’s value toward $250 million.

.Vote
40 VotesUber

Julie Glassberg for The New York Times

There are lots of taxis in New York City, but outside Manhattan, grabbing one can be hit or miss — mostly miss. Uber, a start-up that pairs off-duty private car drivers with stranded passengers, aims to fill this need. The company gives participating drivers iPhones and software that manages passenger pickup requests. Using Uber’s smartphone application, users can alert nearby drivers that they need a ride, then monitor their driver’s progress on a map. “It’s almost like giving people a super power: Press a button and a black car arrives in two minutes,” said Shervin Pishevar, an Uber investor at Menlo Ventures. Uber started in San Francisco but has since spread to eight other cities, including Los Angeles and Boston. The start-up has raised $45 million from a slate of well-known investors, including Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive.

.Vote
13 VotesQuora

Matthew Staver/Bloomberg News

Adam D'Angelo, co-founder of Quora.

This question-and-answer Web site is everything Ask Jeeves never was. Questions range from the silly (“Would Ferris Bueller really have been able to hack into his school’s computer system?” ) to the serious (“What does it feel like to have your spouse die?”). It is not unusual to stumble upon answers from big names. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers is on Quora, as are Ashton Kutcher and Mark Zuckerberg. Quora was founded by Adam D’Angelo and Charlie Cheever, two of Mr. Zuckerberg’s early employees at Facebook, who kept that site from crashing under the weight of hundreds of millions of users. The two now face a more intricate challenge: Helping Quora to grow without sacrificing its smarts and simplicity. Investors are optimistic: The company, which has already raised $11 million from top-tier venture capitalists, is now said to be raising more cash at a $400 million valuation.

.Vote
3 VotesPinwheel

At first glance, Pinwheel, a service that lets you leave virtual notes that are tied to particular spots on the globe, like the best place to watch a sunset, may not seem like a sure bet. It’s not clear yet whether the service, which is still in invitation-only testing mode, will spark excitement beyond the crop of early adopters who are using it. But the founder of the service, Caterina Fake, has a compelling track record. She was a founder of Flickr, which was purchased by Yahoo in 2005, and one of the founders of Hunch, a recommendation service, which eBay bought for $80 million last year. Adding to the heat around her latest company: A crop of newly minted competitors, including Wallit and Dabble.


nytimes.com


[Johnny: The fact that the article misses is the Facebook bought a list of users that they hope to convert to users of Facebook. They essentially paid $20 per user for each of the 50 million user that use Instagram. It is less about technology and more about finding a trend that catches the attention of the public. That is really hard to predict. ]
...

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