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To: Doren who wrote (199498)10/6/2017 11:12:27 AM
From: yofal
2 Recommendations   of 199689
 
I suspect Jobs would have used one of these…

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To: yofal who wrote (199504)10/6/2017 2:49:00 PM
From: Heywood40
2 Recommendations   of 199689
 
You have to admit that using a mirror is a pretty clever idea.


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From: Moonray10/6/2017 3:08:06 PM
   of 199689
 
Apple design chief Jony Ive on Steve Jobs, iPhone X, and his design process

Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive gave a rare public talk in New York on Friday.

Ive was interviewed New Yorker editor-in-chief David Remnick. The session,
"The Shape of Things to Come," was part of the New Yorker's TechFest conference.

The British-born designer has kept a lower profile in recent years, but he's still a
massively important person at Apple, and previously led the design team responsible
for the look and feel of every major Apple product, including the iPhone and the iPad.

Ive's talk on Friday comes after his appearance in a promotional video for the
iPhone X, and a lengthy interview with Charlie Rose in 2016.

Here are some notes from the chat:

Videos at: businessinsider.com

o~~~ O

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To: Moonray who wrote (199499)10/6/2017 5:47:07 PM
From: Doren
   of 199689
 
iPhone 5s and 7s also had some swollen batteries

Probably nothing... these two are getting all the press:






but the profitable broken screen issue stays... profitable...

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To: Moonray who wrote (199499)10/6/2017 6:53:22 PM
From: J.F. Sebastian
   of 199689
 
So on the day, AAPL ends down a whopping 9 cents, or 0.06%. Hardly anything to get worried about.

Even the report you cite had AAPL trading lower by less than half a percentage point earlier in the day.

Amazing what the press will latch onto and blame for minor fluctuations in stock prices.

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From: J.F. Sebastian10/7/2017 1:53:52 AM
2 Recommendations   of 199689
 
Somewhat OT, but worth reading:

'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia

Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attention.

Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. In August, the 34-year-old tech executive took a more radical step to restrict his use of social media and other addictive technologies.

Rosenstein purchased a new iPhone and instructed his assistant to set up a parental-control feature to prevent him from downloading any apps.

He was particularly aware of the allure of Facebook “likes”, which he describes as “bright dings of pseudo-pleasure” that can be as hollow as they are seductive. And Rosenstein should know: he was the Facebook engineer who created the “like” button in the first place.

A decade after he stayed up all night coding a prototype of what was then called an “awesome” button, Rosenstein belongs to a small but growing band of Silicon Valley heretics who complain about the rise of the so-called “attention economy”: an internet shaped around the demands of an advertising economy.

More at: theguardian.com

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From: J.F. Sebastian10/7/2017 2:14:15 AM
2 Recommendations   of 199689
 
Apple gave Uber's app 'unprecedented' access to a secret back door that can record iPhone screens

Uber's iPhone app has a secret back door to powerful Apple features, allowing the ride-hailing service to potentially record a user's screen and access other personal information without their knowledge.

This access to special iPhone functions — which are so powerful that Apple almost always keeps them off-limits to outside companies — is not disclosed in any consumer-facing information included with Uber's app.

Although there is no evidence that Uber used its access to take advantage of the iPhone features, the revelation that the app has access to privileged Apple code raises important questions for a company already under investigation for other controversial business practices.

Uber told Business Insider the code was not being used and was essentially a vestige of an earlier version of its Apple Watch app.

However, it has set off alarm bells among experts.

"Granting such a sensitive entitlement to a third party is unprecedented, as far as I can tell — no other app developers have been able to convince Apple to grant them entitlements they've needed to let their apps utilize certain privileged system functionality," Will Strafach, a security researcher who discovered the situation, told Business Insider.


More at: businessinsider.com

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To: J.F. Sebastian who wrote (199509)10/7/2017 4:25:28 AM
From: Kip S
   of 199689
 
Excellent, insightful, albeit rather frightening article. Thanks for linking.

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To: J.F. Sebastian who wrote (199509)10/7/2017 4:57:14 AM
From: Doren
   of 199689
 
I tend to forget this is not common knowledge:

Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked

How technology companies are keeping you addicted to your phone

The business of mind control has come a long ways since Edward Bernays made it scientific in the early 1900s.

Companies like Google, and Facebook hire psychologists to figure out how to make their sites "sticky." Its certainly no secret. Its doesn't have to be.

I find it bizarre and its one of the reasons I haven't had a smart phone previously. I suspect addiction is mostly visual. When the pokemon AR phenomena hit... it was ridiculous. Its a terrible phenomena... people wandering into traffic, wasting their lives on trivia, but its not the scariest by far...

To me the scariest thing, more scary than nuclear war even, is the coming pairing of genetically enhanced children of the techies with chips linked directly to AI databases and computers - implanted in their brains. They will become logarithmically smarter. If you have the ability to make yourself smarter, then when you make yourself smarter you'll have even more ability to make yourself even smarter... ad infinitum in an ever steepening curve upwards.

I think it will all be over for humans in about 40 years. Its unstoppable.

Think about it... that superhuman will look at a person and instantly know everything about them from huge AI databases they to which they are directly linked, and they will be able to out think that person easily. Can't be stopped. Make a law against it here and it'll happen in China. Make laws everywhere against genetic enhancement and it'll go underground. The money in tech is so huge they'll do what ever they want.


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To: Doren who wrote (199512)10/7/2017 6:52:27 AM
From: Stock Puppy
1 Recommendation   of 199689
 
To me the scariest thing, more scary than nuclear war even, is the coming pairing of genetically enhanced children of the techies with chips linked directly to AI databases and computers - implanted in their brains. They will become logarithmically smarter. If you have the ability to make yourself smarter, then when you make yourself smarter you'll have even more ability to make yourself even smarter... ad infinitum in an ever steepening curve upwards.


Question is whether access to more information will affect creativity (also, define "smart").

Creativity and intelligence may come about due to challenges an individual faces (other factors involved of course) rather than availability of information. On a much lower level, have smartphones made people "smarter"?


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