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To: Stock Puppy who wrote (125579)2/13/2012 11:15:31 PM
From: SiouxPal
   of 176598
 
Thanks I'll do that in a little bit.

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To: Cogito who wrote (125571)2/13/2012 11:15:53 PM
From: Sr K
   of 176598
 
I understood that RW really meant

1001 - entry level iPad, so he was pretty close. That was the price about 3:59.

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To: Cogito who wrote (125574)2/13/2012 11:23:39 PM
From: Stock Puppy
   of 176598
 
We couldn't do it without you


Thank you thank you.

And I don't think I should ever ask you to define "it" :-)

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From: dhellman2/13/2012 11:31:18 PM
   of 176598
 
iPad 3 Will Come in 4G LTE, WSJ Confirms
gizmodo.com

AT&T and Verizon to sell LTE iPad 3 according to WSJ
bgr.com



online.wsj.com $$$
By SPENCER E. ANTE And JESSICA E.VASCELLARO Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Inc. will sell a version of the coming iPad that runs on their newest fourth-generation wireless networks, according to people familiar with the matter, as the battle to cash in on big investments in mobile broadband heats up.

Apple Inc. appears to be planning to announce the latest version of its tablet computer in the first week of March, according to another person briefed on the matter.

Whether other carriers will also sell the device couldn't be learned. Sprint Nextel Corp., T-Mobile USA and Apple declined to comment.

AT&T and Verizon Wireless are the only two U.S. carriers that currently sell the iPad, and are also the only two that offer the fast, next-generation wireless technology known as LTE.

Both companies are banking heavily on LTE to attract new subscribers and to get existing subscribers to upgrade to more lucrative monthly smartphone and tablet contracts. Apple's new iPad, which will work on those LTE networks, would give the country's two largest carriers a device that could help drum up demand for the faster service, in the way the original iPhone dramatically increased demand for 3G wireless data plans.

Verizon Wireless, the country's biggest wireless carrier by subscribers, has invested heavily in its LTE network, which now covers more than 200 million people.

AT&T, Verizon Wireless's biggest competitor, is playing catch-up. Its LTE network covered 74 million people at the end of last year. Chief Executive Randall Stephenson says the network will cover 80% of the U.S. population in 2013.

The carriers have sold millions of smartphones that work with LTE, but coverage gaps and a tendency for devices to burn through battery power while hunting for the network have led many users to keep the LTE option on their phones switched off.

When LTE isn't available, the new iPad will default to a slower network technology, one of these people said.

Richard Doherty, director of research firm Envisioneering Group, said an LTE iPad would test how well carriers' networks could handle heavier data use. He said Apple's current iPad, the iPad 2, which works with third generation wireless networks, consumes on average about four to eight times the amount of data as an iPhone.

4G networks are expected to generate even greater amounts of traffic, as their faster speeds will let users watch entire movies over wireless networks instead of short clips.

"The new iPad will test carriers to see how robust their networks are," Mr. Doherty said.

Carriers are eager to move users over to LTE, because it handles data traffic much more efficiently than today's ubiquitous 3G networks, meaning it chews more slowly through carriers' spectrum holdings. Verizon executives estimate LTE networks are 50% more efficient than 3G networks.

Since its introduction in 2010, the iPad has quickly become Apple's second biggest revenue producer after the iPhone. In the quarter that ended in December, iPad and related products and services generated $9.2 billion in sales, about a fifth of Apple's total.

The launch of the new iPad will come roughly a year after Apple released the iPad 2. Apple sold 15.43 million iPad tablets in the quarter ending in December, up from 7.33 million a year earlier. Total tablet shipments in the fourth quarter of 2011 reached an all-time high of 26.8 million units, up 150% from the fourth quarter of 2010, according to Strategy Analytics.

—Anton Troianovski contributed to this article.

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To: rnsmth who wrote (125572)2/13/2012 11:54:22 PM
From: yosephw
   of 176598
 
Depending on growth assumptions, Apple is fairly valued to undervalued. If we assume that it will grow free cash flow, on average, 15% for the next 10 years, then it's fairly valued.

However, if we assume 25% annual growth for the next 10 years, then it's over 40% undervalued. Just depends on your perspective.

Either way, these levels of consistent growth are extremely rare and I'd be wary of relying on them with SJ no longer in the picture.

Here's the tool I used to calculate AAPL's value: vuru.co

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To: yosephw who wrote (125587)2/14/2012 12:50:09 AM
From: rnsmth
   of 176598
 
<<Either way, these levels of consistent growth are extremely rare and I'd be wary of relying on them with SJ no longer in the picture.>>

I am not looking at 10 year growth rates. I do not project more than 2 years into the future

If you are wary of relying in them, then make your investment decisions accordingly, and best wishes to you!

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To: tcd who wrote (125568)2/14/2012 2:10:44 AM
From: JP Sullivan
   of 176598
 
It's a shakedown. If the law is on Proview's side, Apple will have no choice but to negotiate a settlement, which means writing a big check. This is nothing that money cannot solve. It's a question of how many zeroes, which is a function of how long the parties are willing to drag the whole thing out and exhaust appeal after appeal. Also, consider the psychology of the Proview owners -- maybe invite them to Cupertino, wine and dine, picture with Tim Cook, some Apple memorabilia, and a big fat check. Remember, the iPhone name once belonged to Cisco, and Apple was able to make that issue go away. Ditto with "Apple" and the Beatles. It always comes down to the green stuff.

-we-

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To: Sr K who wrote (125580)2/14/2012 2:32:45 AM
From: JP Sullivan
   of 176598
 
You can't stockpile trademarks that you don't use.

In the US. But the dispute is taking place in China. Dunno what the legal position on the issue is over there.

-we-

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From: J.F. Sebastian2/14/2012 2:49:06 AM
1 Recommendation   of 176598
 
Nicked from the almost dead Tanker thread, courtesy of Sr K:

SNL skit Feb 11, 2012.

nbc.com

I highly recommend watching this one. I imagined a certain belligerent poster on the Tanker thread as the Verizon sales guy, that made it even funnier.

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To: tcd who wrote (125568)2/14/2012 4:00:10 AM
From: Cogito
1 Recommendation   of 176598
 
>>Anybody want to render an opinion on the latest news from China<<


I don't believe It's a big thing. The story says a total of 45 iPads were pulled off store shelves, but other reports I've read indicate that Apple's own stores were still selling them.

The absolute worst case scenario is that Apple would have to pay the company that owns the trademark in China some money. They have quite a bit of money, so that wouldn't have a material effect. And that's the worst possibility.

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