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From: Glenn Petersen9/22/2017 6:57:19 AM
1 Recommendation   of 716
 
Synthetic muscle breakthrough could lead to 'lifelike' robots

Researchers claim it's the closest artificial material equivalent to a natural muscle.

Saqib Shah, @eightiethmnt
engagdet
September 21, 2107



Westworld / HBO
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A breakthrough in soft robotics means scientists are now one step closer to creating lifelike machines. Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a 3D printed synthetic tissue that can act as active muscle. The material, which can push, pull, bend, and twist (thanks to its use of silicone rubber and ethanol-dispensing micro-bubbles) is also capable of carrying 1,000 times its own weight. Not only could the invention result in super-strong machines (like a Terminator that works in manufacturing), but it will also release soft robots from their current shackles.

You see, synthetic muscle tech is presently reliant on tethered external compressors or high voltage equipment. But, robots fitted with this new tissue could theoretically be freed up to move around like humans, enabling them to better grip and pick up objects. Which is a big deal, because the plan is to eventually get these bots to help with non-invasive surgeries and to care for the elderly -- among other tasks.



The researchers are touting the material as the first synthetic muscle that can withstand both high-actuation stress and high strain. "We've been making great strides toward making robots minds, but robot bodies are still primitive," said lead scientist Hod Lipson. "This is a big piece of the puzzle and, like biology, the new actuator can be shaped and reshaped a thousand ways. We've overcome one of the final barriers to making lifelike robots."

After 3D printing it into the desired shape, the team electrically actuated the artificial muscle using a thin resistive wire and low-power (8V). They then tested it in a variety of robotic applications, where it demonstrated significant expansion-contraction ability. The researchers claim the synthetic tissue is also capable of expanding up to 900 percent when electrically heated to 80°C.

Building on their initial findings, the team plans to incorporate conductive materials to replace the need for the connecting wire. Further down the line, they intend to combine it with artificial intelligence that can learn to control the muscle, resulting in (they hope) "natural" movement.

engadget.com

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From: Savant9/26/2017 6:49:15 PM
3 Recommendations   of 716
 

Archaeology /./ 3D printed models of ships sunk back to 2,500 yrs ago in the Black Sea


60+ sunken ships found in Black Sea..dating back 2,500 years..preserved by depleted oxygen in the sea

video.foxnews.com

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From: Savant10/2/2017 12:23:29 AM
3 Recommendations   of 716
 

Xian Y-20
This cargo aircraft is used by the Chinese military in order to ferry goods and soldiers to anywhere in China at a moment’s notice. Perhaps most interestingly, many of the plane’s parts were created using a 3D printer, thereby drastically lowering the cost of production. The plane can carry up to 66 tons, and when filled with troops, has a range of 6,200 miles, enabling this plane to reach anywhere in Asia.


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From: The Ox10/2/2017 3:08:30 PM
2 Recommendations   of 716
 
all3dp.com

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From: EUthenics10/4/2017 5:56:29 PM
   of 716
 
lots of material on SSYS investment in Desktop Metal. New technology
much faster. I can not find anywhere what their $14M in October 2015 got them.
True, DDD is working on its own answer to faster metal production.

If anyone can find the answer to the above that would be excellent.
Thanks Dave

the article was from the Economist June/july 20-17

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (609)10/11/2017 3:54:43 AM
From: Amas
   of 716
 
Awesome idea and great quality!

I wonder how everything will change in just some years in architecture and the city landscape. Hope to see buildings and houses made by 3D printing.

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To: RMP who wrote (673)10/11/2017 4:10:23 AM
From: Amas
   of 716
 
That's really cool!

As for the models used in technologies, there are so much nice examples that I found here treatstock.com

The variety seems growing :)

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