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To: neolib who wrote (5478)4/6/2012 10:20:41 AM
From: smooth2o
of 12182
 
re: Actually that wouldn't be "this time its different". They've gone through several generations of mobile chips without any customers.

So I'll grant you I was incorrect in stating they would be competing with their customers. They don't have any in that sector worth worrying about.



Not germain, it is different this time.

Right, all bets are off...

Smooth

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To: neolib who wrote (5480)4/6/2012 10:25:49 AM
From: smooth2o
of 12182
 
Now you are beginning to see the point. If the OEMs don't move fast enough (Apple is the model), then Intel has no recourse but to do it themselves.

Could work

re: What you fail to understand is that it is exactly that approach which kept Intel margins fat in the PC world, and tanked all their partners in that space (Dell, HP, etc)..

Uhhh, that's what I've been saying... the old model can't work now.

Smooth

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To: smooth2o who wrote (5485)4/6/2012 11:13:20 AM
From: neolib
of 12182
 
Paying attention to history can be useful.

Not germain, it is different this time.

LOL!

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From: rzborusa4/6/2012 12:14:50 PM
of 12182
 
It is hard to see how Intel could abandon the one size fits all model even if they wanted to.

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To: neolib who wrote (5483)4/6/2012 12:37:21 PM
From: To The Moon
of 12182
 
Digitimes says TSMC 28nm capacity is way short of demand (is that another way of saying yields suck?)

If true, will be very bad for QualComm and subsequently Apple.

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To: rzborusa who wrote (5488)4/6/2012 12:37:57 PM
From: rzborusa
of 12182
 
In recent years Intel has signed on to an agreement with the FTC. The agreement is supposed to level the pricing of Intel chips. Now volume will likely be the only differentiator for price. Lower price will drive the OEMs in a race to the bottom. Cutting prices to consumers, competing for volume. Price will be the attraction at retail, other than shape and color of the plastic. If Intel ever gets that far in tab/phone.

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To: To The Moon who wrote (5489)4/6/2012 1:12:27 PM
From: neolib
of 12182
 

If true, will be very bad for QualComm and subsequently Apple.


I'm not sure Apple is using much from Qualcomm that would be 28nm currently. The main things running on 28nm would be processors and GPUs. Apple's processors are still from Samsung, and still 40nm.

Apple is rumored to be looking at TSMC for 28nm processors for the next generation, but I think that is far enough out that the current capacity issues are not too relevant for Apple. The article claimed good capacity in another quarter or so.

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To: rzborusa who wrote (5490)4/6/2012 1:14:55 PM
From: neolib
of 12182
 
The problem for Intel is that the fraction of BOM $ for processors in tablets and smartphones is way lower than what Intel views as their birthright in the PC world. Screens get the most $, and even batteries rival or surpass processors.

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To: neolib who wrote (5492)4/6/2012 1:39:45 PM
From: rzborusa
of 12182
 
Yep, it would be really interesting to see how Intel could do fabing other designs. Maybe their cost is not so good. Still, we could probably assume the performance/power would be better, but how much.

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To: rzborusa who wrote (5493)4/6/2012 4:25:50 PM
From: neolib
of 12182
 
Intel commented somewhat on that aspect re Medfield, by saying that if you look at Qualcomm or Apple, they pay $xx to get the part made by a foundry who has lower margins, but Qualcomm/Apple foots the bill for the IP development and also makes some margin as a result. So Intel gets both margins (IP owner + fab producer) whereas everyone else divides that.

The problem is that in the ARM SOC world, IP is pretty cheap. At the end of the day, Samsung who does IP + fab will sell anyone an ARM SOC at lower margins than Intel finds attractive, and Samsung also pockets both sides of the margins.

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