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From: FUBHO2/17/2012 1:45:38 PM
of 12207
 
Apple Sold More iOS Devices in 2011 than Macs in 28 Years
By: Michelle Maisto
2012-02-17

Apple sold 156 million iOS devices in 2011, which is putting the company on pace to outsell its signature Mac. Still, Apple CEO Tim Cooks thinks the company can do even better...

eweek.com

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From: FUBHO2/17/2012 2:02:45 PM
of 12207
 
Intel: Piper Sees Mobile Prospects, PC Dangers
By Tiernan Ray

Piper Jaffray’s Gus Richard this morning offers up some thoughts on Intel’s (INTC) efforts in the smartphone market in advance of the Mobile World Congress wireless confab starting February 27th in Barcelona, Spain.

Richard, who has a Neutral rating on shares of Intel, writes that the company will likely show it has succeeded in signing up carriers to offer phones with its chips because they need an alternative to Apple (AAPL), Samsung Electronics (SSNLF), and other powerful handset makers:

We believe carriers want their own branded phones. This is expected to shift the customer relationship and control away from handset providers back to the service provider. We believe this is a major element of Intel’s strategy to break into the mobile market. The other major element is to leverage the white box market and ODMs by providing turnkey solutions, or form factor reference designs that can easily be ramped with little to no effort from channel partners.

Still, the “finished product has to be compelling,” notes Richard.

Richard thinks Intel is working with Visa (V) on mobile payments, using its security technology from McAfee.

Richard also has some negative thoughts about the PC market for Intel. He thinks “Apple is working on an ARM-based notebook” computer, referring to chips using technology from ARM Holdings (ARMH), without elaborating.

He also thinks Microsoft’s (MSFT) Windows 8 will be a disappointment:

We think PC demand is very weak this year due to hard disk drive shortages, delays in Windows 8 and our belief that Windows 8 will be a DoA — Dud on Arrival. Windows 8 is the most significant OS revision since the transition from DOS to Windows and likely will be fraught with compatibility issues and bugs.

Intel shares today are up 31 cents, or 1.2%, at $27.14.

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To: FUBHO who wrote (4994)2/17/2012 2:22:37 PM
From: neolib
of 12207
 
I think that is a very good point, re the tension between Apple, Samsung, etc and the carriers. But its a leap from there to needing an x86 solution from Intel. White box and ODM will happily supply any and all with ARM solutions, and those are cheaper, so what does Intel have to offer?

We believe carriers want their own branded phones. This is expected to shift the customer relationship and control away from handset providers back to the service provider. We believe this is a major element of Intel’s strategy to break into the mobile market. The other major element is to leverage the white box market and ODMs by providing turnkey solutions, or form factor reference designs that can easily be ramped with little to no effort from channel partners.

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To: steve harris who wrote (4986)2/17/2012 2:25:50 PM
From: neolib
of 12207
 

Monkeys throwing darts can make money in this action imho.


Well, MIPS giving up a big chunk of yesterdays gains today. However, I do think its Dow 13K and Nas 3K coming up. After of bit of that we might see a pullback.

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To: neolib who wrote (4996)2/17/2012 5:36:34 PM
From: FUBHO
of 12207
 
Apple is working on an ARM-based notebook


Analyst breaks Intel some bad news

17 Feb 2012 17:55 | by Paul Taylor in Lisbon |

Read more: news.techeye.net

Nothing hurts quite so much as being the last one to know when the love affair is over, especially when the whole world seems to know about it and discuss it openly.

One analyst, contributing to the Barron’s blog, has shared some thoughts on the state of Intel’s attempts at securing its place in the mobile market, while soiling the matrimonial bed linen with a vague remark about Apple cheating on Intel with ARM. Something that we’ve mentioned before.

According to August Richard, a Senior Analyst at Piper Jaffray, says that the forthcoming Mobile World Congress will have Intel strutting its Medfield stuff and announcing partnerships – one of which is known to be Motorola Mobility. He also points out that while branded phones like Apple and Samsung are OK for consumers, it’s the carriers that want to get in on the action with their own products, rebranded from Intel’s own designs, it seems.

“We believe carriers want their own branded phones. This is expected to shift the customer relationship and control away from handset providers back to the service provider. We believe this is a major element of Intel’s strategy to break into the mobile market.”

Richard also suggests that Intel has come a long way with Visa and a mobile payments system that is complemented by Intel’s acquisition of the McAfee business, which in turns provides the necessary security.

However, from then on, things tend to go downhill for Intel.

Signs of Apple and Intel’s failing love affair are becoming increasingly clear as both sides start to hedge their bets. Intel’s Ultrabook concept is a clear attempt at mainstreaming the MacBook Air design, while Apple itself dabbles in non-x86 hardware. Even the recently-announced Z1 workstation from HP is a phenomenal smack on the iMac’s cheek.

But neither is Apple less guilty of cheating on Intel. Richard shared some choice thoughts about Intel’s prospects with Apple from the moment he dropped the A-bomb: “Apple is working on an ARM-based notebook” he said.

While Intel will push its Medfield design across both superphone and tablet markets, challenging Apple and Samsung head-on, Apple will do its best to avoid being caught in the wrong with ARM.

Expect to hear from the divorce lawyers soon. You’ll figure it out when the patent suits start flying.

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From: bit32/17/2012 5:55:42 PM
of 12207
 
Former AMD graphics CTO is headed to Qualcommhttp://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2153410/amd-graphics-cto-headed-qualcomm

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To: neolib who wrote (4996)2/17/2012 6:38:44 PM
From: steve harris
of 12207
 
MIPS sure did, I put in a buy stop-limit order and it never recovered to trigger it..

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To: bit3 who wrote (4998)2/17/2012 7:50:36 PM
From: THE WATSONYOUTH
of 12207
 



Nvidia cites poor 28nm yields

David Manners

Friday 17 February 2012 08:21

Nvidia, which pays for its chips by the wafer, has blamed low yields on 28nm for a decline in profit margins.

"The gross margin decline is contributed almost entirely to the yields of 28nm being lower than expected," says Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of Nvidia.

Because Nvidia has a wafer-based pricing arrangement with TSMC, the fewer die per wafer, the higher the die cost.

Last month at IFS2012, Mike Bryant, CTO of Future Horizons, said there were yield problems on TSMC’s 28nm process.





All that TSMC would say in reply was that the28nm ramp was 3x faster, and defect density issues 3x better, than the 40nm ramp at the same stage. However 40nm was a notoriously difficult node.

Xilinx recently said it is having the fastest new-node product roll-out in its history having shipped four of its five 28nm product families in 11 months. That is half the time it took to roll out initial devices in two product families at 40nm.





It has been pointed out that Nvidia usually makes very large die, which are more liable to defect density issues, which could account for the different experiences of Xilinx and Nvidia.

Also Xilinx uses the HPL version of TSMC's 28nm process while Nvidia is using the HP version




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To: Toro Caca who wrote (4979)2/17/2012 9:10:57 PM
From: rzborusa
of 12207
 
This would be a very bad idea for TSMC. Funny thing is you have no idea why.

Is it because of the redundancy inherent in FPGA designs and therefore the ability to "fuse out" or otherwise mitigate defects?

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To: steve harris who wrote (4999)2/17/2012 9:21:03 PM
From: rzborusa
of 12207
 
Getting "stopped in", haven't worked that setup yet. I know others, traders, who consider it an essential tool.

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