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To: Toro Caca who wrote (4949)2/16/2012 9:52:49 AM
From: neolib
of 12845
 
Actually the link I gave claimed the sizes were similar. And FYI, FPGA's now for a number of generations have had some very high speed transistor needs, because of serial I/O. Nobody expects designs implemented in FPGAs to run at anywhere near the speed of custom logic for obvious reasons. This does not mean the process they are implemented on is deficient. In fact, if you read the link, it would appear to be the case that Altera used the CPU process, whereas Xilinx not to. The article was basically about why they chose not to, and they were beating up on Altera (without naming them) for an inferior choice (in their opinion of course).

BTW, IIRC, Intel has agreed to fab some FPGA's on 22nm bleeding edge as well. Forget the name of the company, it was some startup.

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To: THE WATSONYOUTH who wrote (4950)2/16/2012 9:55:11 AM
From: neolib
of 12845
 
You are correct. The 28nm APUs were cancelled, and now its 2013 before AMD is 28nm for them.

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From: neolib2/16/2012 9:58:11 AM
of 12845
 
AMD not getting much of a pop from IB being delayed. IMHO, that is the best news for AMD in 1H12. Although the idea that vendors have excess inventory of notebooks and Intel has excess inventory of SB is not good news I guess. Says something about the lack of red hot demand in the sector. Wonder what happens to Intel's GM on those 22nm fabs sitting there waiting to crank out 22nm IB? Will they be underutilized, or is Intel stockpiling? I suppose yields might be low and that might explain more??

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To: Toro Caca who wrote (4949)2/16/2012 10:09:58 AM
From: fastpathguru
of 12845
 
neolib,Mainly I'd think Xilinx's 28nm parts are much bigger than AMD's APU and GPU's from TSMC. So one would expect much worse yields??

Hate to burst your bubble, but FPGA's are not the same as APU's. Yes, FPGA's are larger die ... but much more regular design that
don't push all the design physical layout corner cases AND how many FPGA's operate at 3+ ghz. You sound like you come
from the school of ... designs is designs ... processes is processes ... and ... parts is parts.

I could have sworn there are GPUs and CPUs rolling off TSMC's 28nm lines right now.

Is it subconcious, or do you actually choose to ignore information that contradicts your agenda? Perhaps it just evaporates as you distill your argument down into a single catch-phrase that's meaningless to anyone not in your little hate-club.

fpg

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From: TechMkt2/16/2012 10:14:30 AM
of 12845
 

Intel 'Ivy Bridge' chip delayed, Windows 8 in September, report claims

by Brooke Crothers February 15, 2012 11:42 PM PST


Chip giant's highly anticipated Ivy Bridge processor--the engine of future ultrabooks--will be delayed, according to a report.

The next-generation Intel chip destined to populate the upcoming crop of ultrabooks is delayed, an Asia-based report claims.

The delay of the "Ivy Bridge" processor is being reported by DigiTimes, a publication that typically voices the concerns of device makers. Those concerns are just as often opinion as they are fact.

That said, the key point is that volume shipments of Ivy Bridge won't happen until "after June," Digitimes said, citing sources at "first-tier notebook vendors [that] are having trouble digesting their Sandy Bridge notebook inventories due to the weak global economy."

A "small volume" of Ivy Bridge processors will ship on schedule in April, the publication added.

The report also mentions that the PC replacement cycle won't begin in earnest until September "when Microsoft launches Windows 8."

Ominously, DigiTimes says the first three quarters of this year--before Windows 8 is released--will be a "dark period" for the notebook industry




Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-57378959-64/intel-ivy-bridge-chip-delayed-windows-8-in-september-report-claims/#ixzz1mYek4Tt4

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To: neolib who wrote (4956)2/16/2012 10:20:03 AM
From: fastpathguru
of 12845
 
AMD not getting much of a pop from IB being delayed. IMHO, that is the best news for AMD in 1H12. Although the idea that vendors have excess inventory of notebooks and Intel has excess inventory of SB is not good news I guess. Says something about the lack of red hot demand in the sector. Wonder what happens to Intel's GM on those 22nm fabs sitting there waiting to crank out 22nm IB? Will they be underutilized, or is Intel stockpiling? I suppose yields might be low and that might explain more??

Intel's not getting much bang for their $300M Ultrabook market development bucks, apparently.

I just feel bad for anyone who's been holding out for the finally good-enough IB UB.

fpg

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To: fastpathguru who wrote (4959)2/16/2012 10:27:44 AM
From: neolib
of 12845
 
I just feel bad for anyone who's been holding out for the finally good-enough IB UB.

Don't worry, he finds the bulk of his DT comfort enough.

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To: TechMkt who wrote (4958)2/16/2012 11:30:14 AM
From: neolib
of 12845
 
I suspect Windows 8 will have a depressing effect on Q2 PC shipments for sure.

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To: neolib who wrote (4961)2/16/2012 12:01:41 PM
From: FUBHO
of 12845
 
Samsung, Huawei Pursue Low Power Servers

February 16, 2012



Samsung and Huawei appear to be joining the growing ranks of companies pursuing low power servers that can act as alternatives to the Intel x86.





$4.99
confidential.eetimes.com

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From: FUBHO2/16/2012 12:17:28 PM
of 12845
 
Intel declares war on Apple

Immovable shiny object mets irresistible farce

16 Feb 2012 08:38 | by Edward Berridge


While it has been muttered about behind closed doors, it seems that the war between Chipzilla and Jobs' Mob has just come into the open.

ZD Net noticed that Asus, which has signed up to Intel's new Ultraclone world, deleted evidence of its competition with the MacBook Air from an Intel/Asus co-branded webpage.

It was all fairly harmless. The advert from last year identified the competitor to its Zenbook Ultrabook as a "Fruit Brand."

Then there was Taiwan Semiconductor's chairman - the father of foundries - Morris Chang who spoke about Intel's Ultrabook war on the MacBook Air as "Intel is competing directly with TSMC's customers while standing behind a veil."

ZD Net speculates that since Intel is paying subsidies to all non- Apple computer manufacturers to make what it calls "underpriced MacBook Air clones" Chang must have been referring to Intel and Apple slugging it out.

Of course calling an Ultrabook "an underpriced MacBook Air" does sort of reveal whose side of the war ZD Net is on. You could equally have referred to a MacBook Air as an overpriced Ultrabook.

Nevertheless Chang has pledged his support to "stand behind" its customers on the battlefield against Intel.

Apple has responded by publicly asking Asus to stop making MacBook Air clones, so it looks like the war is on.

However, if a war has started it seems that Intel at least is keen to pretend that it hasn't. Intel's Bill Calder said that that there have been no Ultrabook 'subsidies.' What it has been doing is offering co-marketing funds to its customers.

He said that these funds are not "subsidies", nor are they anti-competitive and anyway the $300m Ultrabook Fund is focused solely on infrastructure investments to drive down component costs, and none of those funds go directly to OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) or ODMs (original design manufacturers).

The only cash provided to computer manufacturers related to Ultrabooks are solely intended to raise consumer awareness and stimulate demand.

He said Intel loves Apple and really did not care when it tested AMD chips for its MacBook Air.

Apple, of course, has said nothing. It still seems to think that the world is going to forget all about PCs and go to tablets. It does not seem particularly interested in its Air range, and anyway with Intel pushing cheaper Ultrabooks it could find that the Air is simply too expensive to interest the punters.




Read more: news.techeye.net

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