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To: Vattila who wrote (20855)10/5/2017 5:11:02 PM
From: Pravin Kamdar
of 21624
 
Pent up demand?

newegg.com

Or limited supply?

Guess Intel will keep gamers in their court.

Pravin.

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To: Pravin Kamdar who wrote (20856)10/5/2017 5:24:15 PM
From: Vattila
of 21624
 
"8700K is pre-order, stock due this month fingers crossed but Intel are very short, likewise for i5-8600K as well, minimal stocks unfortunately. "

Gibbo at forums.overclockers.co.uk

Some, admittedly selected, comments from the same thread:

"Been 5 years since my build, and motherboard is starting to die, I've held off for gen8 and now looking at the prices, I'm wondering if Ryzen is really good option to go to. I'm going full spec with a 1080 ti for gaming at 4k and I do a fair amount of video editing."

forums.overclockers.co.uk

"If prices are ridiculous / stock issues i will most probably go for a Ryzen too"

forums.overclockers.co.uk

"Me, too."

forums.overclockers.co.uk

"I'm 95% certain I'm going Ryzen instead of 8700k or X299 platform now. The upgrade path is more wallet friendly and gaming at 1440p; it's more GPU orientated anyway and am I really going to notice the difference between the chips with a 1080Ti for example?"

forums.overclockers.co.uk

"If I can't get what I want until Nov/Dec, I will wait and see if Ryzen 2 brings clock speed improvements in Feb in all honesty."

forums.overclockers.co.uk

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To: Vattila who wrote (20857)10/5/2017 5:46:19 PM
From: Pravin Kamdar
of 21624
 
Vattila,

Thanks for collecting that.

Even so, I think Intel will sell as many of them as they can make for the next six months.

Pravin

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To: Pravin Kamdar who wrote (20858)10/5/2017 5:52:41 PM
From: Pravin Kamdar
of 21624
 
pcgamesn.com

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To: Pravin Kamdar who wrote (20858)10/5/2017 7:12:15 PM
From: Vattila
of 21624
 

Agree. The 8-gen, with more cores and good frequency, is admittedly an substantial improvement on the 7-gen. The higher launch price may give way to more competitive pricing as soon as volume is up. And more budget friendly platform options will arrive as well. Still, with more cores and threads, Ryzen remains in the game, and will probably be competing fiercely on price, if need be, to maintain and increase share.

I will keep an eye on the Mindshare statistics throughout Q4 to see how the battle unfolds.

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To: Pravin Kamdar who wrote (20858)10/5/2017 9:34:50 PM
From: rzborusa
of 21624
 
Too much heat. Smells like mild desperation. twt

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To: Vattila who wrote (20860)10/5/2017 11:47:13 PM
From: neolib
of 21624
 
A reasonably condensed review of Coffee Lake at SA:

semiaccurate.com

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To: neolib who wrote (20862)10/6/2017 12:07:27 PM
From: THE WATSONYOUTH
of 21624
 
qualcomm.com

Preliminary estimates based on internal testing show integer throughput performance comparable to Intel Xeon Platinum Series at significantly lower power.
At the 2017 Linley Processor Conference this week, we will share additional details about the SoC foundational elements and how they address the needs of cloud datacenter workloads:

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To: THE WATSONYOUTH who wrote (20863)10/6/2017 12:25:15 PM
From: THE WATSONYOUTH
of 21624
 
Qualcomm’s Falkor Targets Servers
September 19, 2017
Author: Tom R. Halfhill

linleygroup.com

Stretching for the semiconductor industry’s highest-hanging fruit, Qualcomm’s new ARMv8 Centriq processor is targeting Intel’s 99% dominance of the server market. Arriving later this year, Centriq will shake Intel’s tree in the hope that some of the high-margin fruit will fall into its waiting ARMs. The new Falkor CPU is a core part of this strategy.

Falkor resembles the ARM-compatible CPUs that Qualcomm formerly designed for its Snapdragon smartphone processors but adds some higher-performance features. In one major departure, it ditches 32-bit compatibility altogether in favor of software written only for the Aarch64 instruction set.

Centriq is designed mainly for cloud-service providers (CSPs) that need bushels of power-efficient parallelism to run numerous virtual machines for their remote clients. Sampling for almost a year, the 64-bit chips are scheduled to begin production in 4Q17.

The Centriq 2400 has 48 cores, far more than any Intel or AMD server processor. Qualcomm boasts that Centriq is the first server processor manufactured in 10nm FinFET technology, but this foundry process (likely Samsung’s) is similar to Intel’s current 14nm technology. Qualcomm has been vague about the chip’s clock speed and says only that it will exceed 2.0GHz—not exactly a speed demon for a chip manufactured in a next-generation IC process.

Falkor is not a Xeon-class CPU, as it lags Skylake in both superscalar decoding and instruction-reordering capacity, among other metrics. Thus, it’s best suited to applications with lightweight threads. It should be appealing for some data-center applications, particularly if the price is low. Like other ARM server vendors, Qualcomm will probably need more than one generation to produce a truly competitive server processor.

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To: THE WATSONYOUTH who wrote (20863)10/6/2017 12:35:29 PM
From: neolib
of 21624
 
I see from this they claim they will ship commercially later this year (so Nov/Dec). This is the interesting part, and we have known it for quite some time:

Falkor serves as the scalable building block for the Qualcomm Centriq 2400 Processor, the world’s first 10nm server processor, which will begin shipping commercially later this year.

That process will beat Intel's current process and handily beat AMD/GF's 14 and 12nm processes. So an ARM server SoC will be on the most advanced shipping process. And I expect Qualcomm to turn the crank on TSMC's 7nm process as one of the leading parts there too. No wonder Intel has shifted the server parts to be the leading device on new processes. They are trying to protect the cash cow.

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