SI
SI
discoversearch

 Technology Stocks | Android OS - GOOG


Previous 10 | Next 10 
To: sylvester80 who wrote (5392)2/28/2012 9:50:16 AM
From: Eva
   of 6413
 
You are not well informed about the NEW Nokia, they partnered up with microsoft, and with Nokia lumia started windows. No more symbion. It is a great new windows phone, perfect for the masses who are familiar with windows, think about it.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (2)

To: Eva who wrote (5394)2/28/2012 10:09:47 AM
From: zax
   of 6413
 
We aren't sure what's the strangest thing about Nokia's new offering, the fact that it's got a 41 Megapixel camera or the fact that it runs Symbian. It has a very high resolution sensor and uses oversampling, apparently producing good results in low light. Users can either save a maximum of 38Mpixels, or else zoom and crop for normal resolution images. Observers expected a maximum of one more Symbian phone before Nokia shifts over to Windows Phone. This suggests either a longer life for Symbian — or maybe [that] Symbian was just an easier platform to make a show-stopping device that may turn out to be more of a concept phone.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

To: Eva who wrote (5394)2/28/2012 10:33:55 AM
From: sylvester80
1 Recommendation   of 6413
 
Nope. The 808 with the super duper camera is running Symbian OS. Go ask Nokia why they did that.

pluggedin.co.uk 

The specs for the 808 are nothing to write home about, and the device runs the outdated Symbian OS

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)


From: sylvester803/1/2012 9:15:19 AM
   of 6413
 

FOR ONE DAY ONLY...Pentaband Unlocked Samsung Galaxy Nexus i9250 GSM 16GB Android Smartphone with Wi-Fi, 3G, 4G and HD Display (Silver or White) for $529.99 only for 1 day

lastcall.dailysteals.com 

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: sylvester803/1/2012 8:30:45 PM
   of 6413
 
Android on fire at Mobile World Congress, but not just for westerners
Google's platform is ripe with potential for emerging markets if handsets get down to $30 price points
guardian.co.uk 

Google's Android logo has been ubiquitous at Mobile World Congress 2012. Photo: Stuart Dredge
As Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt prepared to take the stage for his Tuesday Mobile World Congress keynote, journalists in the US were receiving an email from Apple inviting them to the iPad 3 launch event. It's safe to say the relationship between the two companies remains... complicated.

Apple may have drawn some of the limelight away from Schmidt's speech, but MWC has been very much Android's show – and not just because its great frenemy doesn't have an official presence here.

Android is on a tear right now, and there have been numerous reminders at the show. That includes the stats – 300m activated Android devices, 850k more every day and 1bn app downloads a month – and also the impressive latest wave of Android devices from Samsung, HTC and other manufacturers.

The Android stand is thrumming with activity, including an array of developers talking enthusiastically about Android as an OS and as a business opportunity. Which, of course, they would – they're on Google's stand as guests after all – but it's a mood I've also caught from developers elsewhere at MWC.

The majority of developers I've met say they are focusing on iOS and Android. In fact, the two are often run together: "iOSandAndroid" is definitely a mantra (although for interest, a decent number go on to say they're actively thinking about Windows Phone as their third platform).

As in 2011, Google has scattered robot-logo bins of Android pin-badges around the MWC halls. The treasure hunt may have lost its surprise factor second time round, but it still makes its point effectively, contrasting Google's network of partnerships with manufacturers, operators and technology firms with Apple's more aloof stance.

That's not to say one is preferable to the other – the truth is that both companies are succeeding hugely – but the pin-badges do hammer home Google's rapid progress in embedding itself in the mobile industry. Schmidt's speech also elicited a notably warmer response from MWC delegates than he has in the past, when Google was still seen as a threatening foe rather than a partner by the mobile operators.

There are still wrinkles in the Android strategy, when it comes to apps and developers. A number of the booths on the Android stand are showing rich 3D games, for example: just the thing to show off the quad-core processors in the coming wave of Android devices.

Yet these games are more expensive to develop, at a time when the demand for paid apps on Android remains a controversial debate. Perhaps the richer content will help create a healthier market for paid Android apps, or perhaps these developers will find success by adopting freemium business models. It is still early days.

Actually, though, the most interesting thing about Android in relation to developers and apps is not what's happening in the US, UK and other well-developed smartphone markets.

One of Schmidt's key points in his speech was the march of Android into more affordable handsets in the year ahead. "Many of our partners are working on phones in the $100-$150 range. The ultimate goal is a $70 device," he told delegates, while stressing that this could mean $20 or $30 for consumers, after operator subsidies.

A burgeoning market for low-cost Android handsets – yes, even if they're not running the latest version of the OS – could create really interesting opportunities for apps in territories like China, India, Latin America and Africa. And this is without talking about the potential for affordable tablets in those places.

Some of the apps taking advantage may be the ones that are popular in the western world – Rovio is certainly alive to the potential of getting its next 800m Angry Birds downloads from emerging markets, for example. But the opportunity is probably more about local developers in these countries, making apps that are relevant to the markets.

This is by no means an open goal for Android. Western journalists and tech bloggers haven't written enough about what Nokia is doing with its Asha handsets, which are just as important to the company's future as its Windows Phone strategy, for example.

However, one of the key trends at Mobile World Congress this year, for me, is that Android's success should not be judged solely against iOS, even if that rivalry is clearly front-of-mind for both companies at the moment.

Supporting both platforms is increasingly a given for startups and developers in the western world. But it's the developers elsewhere in the world who may be starting with Android as their lead apps platform who are just as important to Google's mobile prospects in the years to come.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

To: sylvester80 who wrote (5396)3/1/2012 10:23:31 PM
From: Eva
   of 6413
 
You are right, my mistake, why, I will have to ask my son, who is Head of Design at Nokia .

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


From: sylvester803/2/2012 7:44:27 AM
   of 6413
 
Always Innovating HDMI Android dongle gets an ICS update, we swing by for a taste (video)
By Zach Honig posted Mar 1st 2012 11:50AM
engadget.com 


Always Innovating appears to be living up to its name, making significant progress on that clever HDMI Android dongle that we first heard of way back at CES. Now the company's TI OMAP4-based television companion is rockin' some Ice Cream Sandwich madness, drawing curious Mobile World Congressattendees into the Texas Instruments booth for a look. We happened upon the device on the last day of the show, and we couldn't help but be impressed. The premise here is quite simple: your "dumb TV" (i.e. one that isn't Internet-enabled) gives up one HDMI and one USB port (for power), in return connecting you to the wonderful world of Android 4.0. Think web browsing, tweeting, gaming (yes, even Angry Birds), video streaming -- that same experience you'll get with any Android tablet can now be had on your aging flat-screen TV.

Always Innovating isn't feeling inspired enough to take the lead on manufacturing, instead licensing the technology to third parties, but with some agreements signed and others on the way, this ICS solution on a stick may be hitting stores just in time to become this holiday season's ultimate stocking stuffer. Pricing is of course up to the manufacturers, but TI reps suggested that we might see these things pop up later this year in the $50-99 range, finally making Google on every TV a much more reasonable proposition. Care to take a gander at this stick-based wunderkind? Jump past the break for our hands-on.

Always Innovating HDMI Android dongle







VIDEO - engadget.com 

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: sylvester803/2/2012 12:54:06 PM
   of 6413
 
Samsung Galaxy S III to be released next month after it's announced this month, says ZDNet Korea
Samsung Galaxy S III to be released next month after it's announced this month, says ZDNet Korea
by Phil Nickinson on 3/2/2012 | Filed Under: Smartphones, News, Rumors; Tags: android, samsung, smartphone, rumor, galaxy s iii, samsung galaxy s iii, samsung galaxy s3, galaxy s3 | 26 comments


The Samsung Galaxy S III (or now, apparently, the Galaxy S3) will be released in April, after it's announced in March, says ZDNet Korea,citing marketing sources. Could well happen. Or not. Of course, Samsung has to announce the phone, and then release dates will roll out worldwide as they always do -- slowly and gradually. And those of us here in the United States will have to wait for the carriers to make their own announcements. ZDNet's sources say it'll all revolve around some heavy Summer Olympics marketing, which would make sense.

We'll let you know when we actually see announcement invites or something ... what's that word ... official.

Source: ZDNet Korea

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: clochard3/3/2012 4:32:22 AM
1 Recommendation   of 6413
 
As the owner of Android and Apple phones and tablets I am bothered by lackluster performance of the Android devices. Poor App reliability, poor system responsiveness, and late or missing updates by the manufacturer are a bad omen. My recomendation: if an Apple device meets your needs regarding screen size, then choose it.

Examples:

My Google (Samsung) Nexus S takes a few minutes to switch from 3g to WiFi.

My Archos 80g turbo dual core has sluggish screen response and frequent app crashes.

Some apps are available for the Nexus but not for the Archos.


Both are running older Android releases and no later versions are available as yet.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (5)


To: clochard who wrote (5402)3/3/2012 3:49:18 PM
From: sylvester80
1 Recommendation   of 6413
 
I owned a iPhone3GS which was a piece of crap. I had to replace it 4 times to get one that worked even remotely as a phone. iPhones are junk and so is iOS. Only morons and idiots buy that garbage. And that is why I switched to Android with my Android Vibrant (Galaxy S). It came with Android 2.1, got upgraded to 2.2, then 2.3 and now I'm running 4.0 on it. And Android 4.0 on it is super fast and works like a dream. iPhone, iPhone3G and iPhone3GS could not upgrade their phones like I could my Android. iPhones suck and so does iPOS.

BTW, Android 4.0 ICS 4.0 is available for the Nexus S. And the Archos 80g was never a tablet. Google said so from day 1. The first Android OS for tablets was Honeycomb 3.0. If your tablet came with honeycomb, then your tablet already is running Android 4.0 ICS (Motorola Xoom/Asus transformer) or will be so by end of April/May. All OEMs have announced ICS plans for their honeycomb tablets.


Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read
Previous 10 | Next 10 

Copyright © 1995-2014 Knight Sac Media. All rights reserved.Stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes - See Terms of Use.