SI
SI
discoversearch

 Technology Stocks | Media Stocks--Newspaper, TV, Radio, etc.


Previous 10 | Next 10 
From: joseffy2/14/2012 11:51:36 AM
   of 814
 
INCOMPETENCE--as expected from the "news" media


Anatomy of a Tear-Jerker
Why does Adele's 'Someone Like You' make everyone cry?Science has found the formula

Wall Street Journal MICHAELEEN DOUCLEFF FEBRUARY 11, 2012
online.wsj.com


On Sunday night, the British singer-songwriter Adele is expected to sweep the Grammys. Three of her six nominations are for her rollicking hit "Rolling in the Deep." But it's her ballad "Someone Like You" that has risen to near-iconic status recently, due in large part to its uncanny power to elicit tears and chills from listeners. The song is so famously sob-inducing that "Saturday Night Live" recently ran a skit in which a group of co-workers play the tune so they can all have a good cry together.

Adele, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter performed "Someone Like You" from her latest album "21" at WSJ Cafe

What explains the magic of Adele's song? Though personal experience and culture play into individual reactions, researchers have found that certain features of music are consistently associated with producing strong emotions in listeners. Combined with heartfelt lyrics and a powerhouse voice, these structures can send reward signals to our brains that rival any other pleasure.

Twenty years ago, the British psychologist John Sloboda conducted a simple experiment. He asked music lovers to identify passages of songs that reliably set off a physical reaction, such as tears or goose bumps. Participants identified 20 tear-triggering passages, and when Dr. Sloboda analyzed their properties, a trend emerged: 18 contained a musical device called an "appoggiatura."

An appoggiatura is a type of ornamental note that clashes with the melody [WRONG –It clashes with the CHORD it sounds with] just enough to create a dissonant sound. "This generates tension in the listener," said Martin Guhn, a psychologist at the University of British Columbia who co-wrote a 2007 study on the subject. "When the notes return to the anticipated melody, the tension resolves, and it feels good."

Chills often descend on listeners at these moments of resolution. When several appoggiaturas occur next to each other in a melody, it generates a cycle of tension and release. This provokes an even stronger reaction, and that is when the tears start to flow.

"Someone Like You," which Adele wrote with Dan Wilson, is sprinkled with ornamental notes similar to appoggiaturas. In addition, during the chorus, Adele slightly modulates her pitch at the end of long notes right before the accompaniment goes to a new harmony, creating mini-roller coasters of tension and resolution, said Dr. Guhn.

To learn more about the formula for a tear-jerker, a few years ago Dr. Guhn and his colleague Marcel Zentner found musical excerpts—from Mendelssohn's "Trio for Piano" [There is no such piece as ‘Trio for Piano’ by Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn did write TWO trios for piano AND STRINGS] and Barber's "Adagio for Strings," for example—that reliably produce the chills and then measured the physiological reactions (heart rate, sweating, goose bumps) of listeners.

Chill-provoking passages, they found, shared at least four features. They began softly and then suddenly became loud. They included an abrupt entrance of a new "voice," either a new instrument or harmony. And they often involved an expansion of the frequencies played. In one passage from Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 23 (K. 488), for instance, the violins jump up one octave to echo the melody. Finally, all the passages contained unexpected deviations in the melody or the harmony. Music is most likely to tingle the spine, in short, when it includes surprises in volume, timbre and harmonic pattern.

"Someone Like You" is a textbook example. "The song begins with a soft, repetitive pattern," said Dr. Guhn, while Adele keeps the notes within a narrow frequency range. The lyrics are wistful but restrained: "I heard that you're settled down, that you found a girl and you're married now." This all sets up a sentimental and melancholy mood.

When the chorus enters, Adele's voice jumps up an octave, and she belts out notes with increasing volume. The harmony shifts, and the lyrics become more dramatic: "Sometimes it lasts in love, but sometimes it hurts instead."

Adele, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter performed "Rolling In The Deep" from her latest album "21" at WSJ Cafe

When the music suddenly breaks from its expected pattern, our sympathetic nervous system goes on high alert; our hearts race and we start to sweat. Depending on the context, we interpret this state of arousal as positive or negative, happy or sad.

If "Someone Like You" produces such intense sadness in listeners, why is it so popular? Last year, Robert Zatorre and his team of neuroscientists at McGill University reported that emotionally intense music releases dopamine in the pleasure and reward centers of the brain, similar to the effects of food, sex and drugs. This makes us feel good and motivates us to repeat the behavior.

Measuring listeners' responses, Dr. Zatorre's team found that the number of goose bumps observed correlated with the amount of dopamine released, even when the music was extremely sad. The results suggest that the more emotions a song provokes—whether depressing or uplifting—the more we crave the song.

With "Someone Like You," Adele and Mr. Wilson not only crafted a perfect tear-jerker but also stumbled upon a formula for commercial success: Unleash the tears and chills with small surprises, a smoky voice and soulful lyrics, and then sit back and let the dopamine keep us coming back for more.

—Ms. Doucleff is a scientific editor at the journal Cell.


Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)

To: joseffy who wrote (373)2/14/2012 2:23:53 PM
From: MJ
   of 814
 
One doesn't need a scientific analysis of music to understand that music reflects and provokes emotions.
I particularly noticed the reference to Mendelssohn.

Mendelssohn wrote "The Sadness of The Soul" or is it "Sadness of the Soul" which rarely is heard or mentioned. I discovered it several years ago in an old magazine of the early 1900's.

Bookmarked your site------------what a great reference board.

mj

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (2)

To: MJ who wrote (374)2/20/2012 11:06:32 AM
From: joseffy
1 Recommendation   of 814
 
Why Pay to Read Lies? Newspapers in Decline

Alan Caruba Monday, February 20, 2012
canadafreepress.com



The job I loved most in my long career as a writer was as a journalist, first on weekly newspapers and then on a daily. I loved breaking news, the deadlines, and the thrill of seeing my words in print. Old enough to remember Linotype, I even would set pages with the newly minted metal strips of text.

The day The New York Times Jersey edition published a piece I wrote, I thought I had reached some magical place amongst my fellow journalists. What I had unknowingly reached was being published a newspaper with a long history of printing lies and doing everything in its power to influence events through its news columns. That’s a no-no.

In a long career as a public relations counselor I have counted many reporters and editors among my friends and still do. I have been a member of the Society of Professional Journalists since the 1970s.

Sadly, journalism never did and probably still doesn’t pay salaries commensurate with the economy. So, in the words of Mae West, “I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.”

In 1984, I founded The National Anxiety Center as a clearinghouse for information about scare campaigns that were designed to influence public opinion and policy. My primary concern was all the lies being told by self-identified environmentalists.

Simply stated, if some Green group tells you something, get a second and third opinion. They are lying.

The worst of it that the media has taken their lies at face value and continue to pass them alongto a public that is easily fooled and easily scared. This is especially true of “official” sources such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy, and others. All governments lie to their citizens and ours is no exception.

The damage that Green lies do can get people killed. Since the publication of Rachel Carson’s “The Silent Spring” millions, particularly in Africa and subtropical nations have died from malaria because DDT was banned as the result of her book. Similarly, the least reported, but most current story is the deep freeze that has affected much of Europe and which has caused several hundred deaths.

Like a biblical punishment, newspapers are feeling the brunt of the changes the Internet has brought about. With search engines at our fingertips, anyone can research any topic of interest, often finding that what the daily newspaper or news magazine had to say about it is replete with omissions of critical facts or the deliberate dissemination of falsehoods.

Then there’s the way the newspapers and other news media tend to focus on stories like the death and funeral of Whitney Houston or some local tragedy that briefly attracts national attention. Wars are usually reported in terms of casualties. Political campaigns are reduced to horse races. Religious and moral issues barely tolerated.

Almost anything published about Islam must be read through the thin gauze of political correctness that ignores the menace of Islam to those living in Muslim nations and in nations where they gain a population foothold. It is a religion that sanctions stoning women to death, decapitating “infidels”, and even sending children into mine fields to clear them. It is pure barbarism and has zero tolerance for freedom of speech, the press, other religions, or independent thought.

All of this has much to do with the decline of newspapers nationwide. In January, on the website of Editor& Publisher, Alan D. Mutter, a former editor who blogs at Newsosaur, wrote the “Daily Paper Going the Way of the Milkman.” That caught my eye because I am old enough to remember a horse-drawn milk wagon (it was during WWII) pulling up at the driveway of my home to make deliveries.

The thought that newspaper delivery will cease in many cities around the nation is disquieting, but circulation is plunging.

The result is that reductions of newsroom staffs, reporters and editors, have been surging, with jobs eliminated in 2011 reaching nearly 30% more than the prior year. There have been five years of revenue declines. One blogger, Erica Smith, who follows the trends, estimated that 3,775+ newspaper jobs were eliminated in 2011.

According to an annual survey by the American Society of News Editors, nearly one in three newsroom jobs have been eliminated since the number of journalists peaked at 56,900 in 1989. By the end of 2010, there were only 41,600 ink-stained wretches left on the industry’s payrolls.

In recent weeks The Wall Street Journal reported “Gannett’s Profit Drops 33%” and “Thompson Reuters Posts Loss.”

Putting aside why advertisers are seeking greener pastures and platforms to sell their goods, let me suggest that an underlying and largely unexplored reason for the declines being felt throughout traditional print journalism outlets is that people simply do not want to pay for lies every day between the horoscope, the crossword puzzle, and the obituary page.

Lies? The print media and its broadcast counterpart fell totally in love with Barack Obama in 2008 and we ended up with a completely unknown and largely unvetted former Senator who hadn’t even served a full term there. People remember stuff like that.

They remember years of unmitigated lies about “global warming” when there wasn’t any threat at all.

They remember being told that coffee was bad for you followed by stories that coffee is good for you.

There are many factors at play in the decline of newspapers, but I think one factor is the general disenchantment with the product—the news—that too often tends to turn out to be false.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


To: MJ who wrote (374)2/28/2012 10:57:23 AM
From: joseffy
1 Recommendation   of 814
 

Blackmail settlement provides look into the Media Matters lair:


Media Matters boss paid former partner $850G 'blackmail' settlement

By Jana Winter February 27, 2012


Media Matters chief David Brock paid a former domestic partner $850,000 after being threatened with damaging information involving the organization’s donors and the IRS– a deal that Brock later characterized as a blackmail payment, according to legal documents obtained by FoxNews.com.

In an acrimonious lawsuit settled at the end of last year, Brock accused William Grey of making repeated threats to expose him to the "scorn or ridicule of his employees, donors and the press in demanding money and property." Brock claimed in legal papers that he sold a Rehoboth Beach, Del., home he once shared with Grey in order to meet Grey’s demands, which he called "blackmail" in the lawsuit.


  • Former Vacation home of Media Matters Founder David Brock, a converted inn house in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. Brock sold the home in May 2010. The current owner razed the house and divided the plot for two new properties.



Brock, 49, heads the non-profit Media Matters for America, which bills itself as a watchdog of the conservative media but has recently come under fire for allegedly coordinating with Democrats in what could be a violation of its tax-exempt status.

Brock’s bitter legal battle with Grey, who is described in a Sept. 14, 2010, police report obtained by FoxNews.com as his domestic partner of more than 10 years, began after Brock began datingWashington, D.C., restaurant impresario James Alefantis about five years ago. For the next three years, Brock and Grey traded angry accusations, which were documented in the police report and were the foundation of a pitched legal battle replete with charges of blackmail, theft and financial malfeasance.

Read the police report detailing the lawsuit

Alefantis was also named as a defendant in Grey's lawsuit.

In his response to Brock's lawsuit, Grey "denies that he committed any "acts of blackmail.""

Grey threatened to go public about Brock and Media Matters' finances after he accused Brock in a civil suit filed in Washington of taking $170,000 in possessions, including an $8,000 Louis Vuitton suit bag, paintings, a rug, a chandelier, a painted bust of a Roman soldier and a pair of carved wooden chairs upholstered with purple fabric. Those possessions were displayed in the Washington townhouse where the couple entertained liberal movers and shakersin happier times.

Brock took Grey’s threats seriously and called police in 2010. In the police report, filed by Metropolitan Police as a stalking incident, Brock accused Grey, also 49, of attempting to blackmail him with a series of emails threatening to "release specific derogatory information about [Brock] and his organization to the press and donors that would be embarrassing to him and cause harm to the organization …"

Some of those emails came out as the lawsuit, filed by Grey on Jan. 28, 2011, wound its way through Superior Court of the District of Columbia last year.

Read the complete lawsuit filed by William Grey

"Please finish this today so I don’t have to waste my time emailing anyone – Biden, Coulter, Carlson, Huffington, Drudge, Ingraham," Grey wrote in a 2008 email.

Nearly two years later, Grey accused Brock of "financial malfeasance" and threatened to undermine Brock’s fundraising efforts.

"Next step is I contact all your donors and the IRS,"Grey wrote in an email dated May 19, 2010. "This is going to stink for you if you do not resolve this now."

Brock said in court papers that he paid Grey "under duress."

On March 8, 2011, Brock filed his own suit against Grey for more than $4 million, demanding Grey return the $850,000, plus pay millions more in punitive damages. The two settled two months ago under terms that remain confidential.

Read the complete counterclaim filed by David Brock

Paying off Grey may not have been easy for Brock, even with his salary of nearly $300,000 at Media Matters. Records show Brock had pulled massive amounts of equity from the six-bedroom Rehoboth Beach house as its value skyrocketed during the real estate bubble.

Sussex County property records show he took out a $273,000 mortgage to buy the pale yellow colonial and carriage house for $606,666 in 1995. As the converted inn, built in 1793, continued to rise in value, Brock refinanced his loan on at least two occasions. Records show he had a $1.44 million mortgage on the property, as well as two more loans against the home totaling just over $500,000.

Brock received $1,587,500 for the home on May 25, 2010, in a sale to McLean, Va.-based Vardell Realty Investments. It could not be determined how much Brock still owed on the $1.44 million mortgage, or how much he netted from the sale, if any.

Records indicate that Brock had paid off the two smaller loans at the time of the sale.

Within a year of selling the house, Brock apparently had second thoughts about paying off Grey. In the civil suit, Brock accused Grey of three counts of blackmail, citing a statute that defines blackmail as threatening "to expose a secret or publicize a fact, whether true or false, tending to subject any person to hatred, contempt, or ridicule, to impair the reputation of any person."

He countersued to get his $850,000 back, plus $500,000 for each of three counts of alleged blackmail, and another $2 million in compensatory damages based in part on what Brock’s lawyers called abuse of the judicial system and legal fees.

Grey, who relocated to Massachusetts, declined to comment when contacted by FoxNews.com. Brock and Alefantis remain in Washington, where Brock has released a new book attacking Fox News. He is also under scrutiny from several members of Congress amid reports Media Matters for America is in possible violation of IRS laws governing nonprofits.

The Rehoboth Beach home was torn down months after Brock sold it, amid much community opposition, so the buyer could divide the parcel and build two homes. It remains a vacant lot.





Read more: >http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/02/27/media-matters-boss-paid-former-partner-850g-blackmail-settlement/#ixzz1ngeDT3H6



Photo of (looking coked up) Brock with Barney Frank


credit to brumar

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)

To: joseffy who wrote (376)2/28/2012 12:44:40 PM
From: MJ
1 Recommendation   of 814
 
A real sick bunch. Frank's networks never stop----.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (3)

To: MJ who wrote (377)3/1/2012 11:58:55 AM
From: joseffy
   of 814
 
Liberals celebrate death of Andrew Breitbart

March 1, 2012 by Charlie Spiering Commentary Staff Writer
campaign2012.washingtonexaminer.com

As news broke this morning of the tragic death of Conservative journalist Andrew Breitbart, liberals celebrated the news on Twitter. The most influential tweet came from

Slate's Matt Yglesias (@mattyglesias), who tweeted: "Conventions around dead people are ridiculous. The world outlook is slightly improved with @AndrewBrietbart dead."


AlmightyBob ? @AlmightyBoob : @AndrewBreitbart haha youre dead and in hell being a gay with hitler

Jeff Glasse ? @jeffglasse : Andrew Breitbart now enjoying afternoon tea with Hitler #goodriddanceyouhack

Scott On Da Rox @ridinchillwaves : RT GOOD RIDDANCE..fascist prick @Gawker: Andrew Breitbart Dead? gawker.com/5889586/

Josh M ? @TheSocialest : Good riddance Breitbart. Hopefully they put James O'Keefe in your casket.

John Kapp ? @johnkapp : Andrew Breitbart was a racist, sexist, homophobe. Good riddance.

Gabriel ? @gabriel0923 : Andrew #Breitbart has died having been finally consumed by his revolting hatred! The world is better off without him!

Dufus ? @dufus : Did we cry when Hitler died? No.. #Breitbart see you in hell asshole

Natasha Yar-Routh ? @xiomberg : Andrew Breitbart is dead, good riddance to bad trash. He was a vile excuse for a human being

Dave Lartigue ? @daveexmachina: Andrew Breitbart has died. Honestly, good riddance. He helped poison the country where I live and we are better off without him.

Lalo Alcaraz ? @laloalcaraz RT @Mfusion66: RIP Breitbart? Nah, too good to be true

vtred ? @vtred1 : Good riddance to Andrew Breitbart - a McCarthyite nutcase.

Gene Moore ? @gene_moore :So it begins... #Breitbart RT Good riddance, a truly dispecable person.

Sean Paul Kelley ? @seanpaulkelley Andrew Breitbart has died: bigjournalism.com/lsolov/2012/03… If so, good riddance.

CpG ? @Crow1138 : I know it's wrong, but good riddance “@cnnbrk: Conservative blogger Andrew #Breitbart has died, attorney says. on.cnn.com/wkDt4g”

TahitiNut ? @TahitiNut: Forgive me, God, for I have sinned. I err on the side of being pleased with a death ... of Andrew Breitbart.Good riddance.

michael mayer ? @prisonforbush: Breitbart dead? D Good riddance. More republicans should follow his lead.

DAC ? @dac2527 : Satan calls Andrew Breitbart home... Good riddance!

Kate Witko ? @katewitko: Andrew Breitbart is dead at 43 from "natural causes". hrm yes I suppose wine is pretty natural. good riddance, asshole.

WeirdArchives ? @WeirdArchives: Looks like it's official. Andrew Breitbart is dead. Personally I don't like the guy, so good riddance to bad rubbish.

Scott On Da Rox ? @ridinchillwaves : RT GOOD RIDDANCE..fascist prick@Gawker: Andrew Breitbart Dead? gawker.com/5889586/

Mike Hightower ? @MikeHightower1 Good riddance andrew breitbart.

Nick Huinker ? @towndrinker good riddance to bad rubbish. no reason to mourn someone who made it their business to make this world a less pleasant place. #breitbart

Michael David ? @renmikedGood riddance Andrew #Breitbart.

Inglorious Basterdz ? @TheLibertyLamp : Andrew Breitbart destroyed lives based on LIES, I will not be some phony liberal and pretend condolences. ROT IN HELL ANDREW U BASTARD!




Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


To: MJ who wrote (377)3/9/2012 10:26:49 AM
From: joseffy
   of 814
 
Was Soledad O’Brien Bailed Out by Producers on Critical Race Theory Definition?

March 8, 2012 By Pinecone
rebelpundit.com


CNN’s Soledad O’Brien’s venomously sarcastic interview with Breitbart.com editor-in-chief Joel Pollak culminated with her throwing out her definition of “Critical Race Theory” in the heat of her interview over the Obama/Bell Tapes released last night. Pollak had already requested that O’Brien define the term more than once, and at the 1:45 mark in the video below, she finally does. One problem–O’Brien’s definition appears to be lifted almost word-for-word from a wikipedia page, presumably hurriedly communicated to Soledad in the midst of her interview.



A quick google search of O’Brien’s exact phrasing, in quotes, returns the Critical Race Theory wikipedia page as the first entry. Read and decide for yourself:

Soledad O’Brien: “Critical Race Theory looks into the intersection of race and politics and the law.”

Wikipedia entry on Critical Race Theory: “Critical Race Theory (CRT) is an academic discipline focused upon the intersection of race, law and power.”

O’Brien’s fumbling to come up with a response occurred when she attempted to challenge Pollak’s definition of critical race theory:

Soledad O’Brien: “That is a complete misreading of critical race theory. As you know, that’s an actual theory, and you could google it and someone would give you a good definition of it. So that’s not correct. So keep going.”

Joel Pollak: “In what way is it a critical misreading? Can you explain to me? Do you know what critical–Explain to your readers what critical race theory is.”

Soledad O’Brien: “I’m going to ask you to continue on. I’m just going to point out that that is inaccurate. Keep going.”

Pollak once again asked that she define it, at which point she inserted the wikipedia-esque response. See the video below.

Later in the video, O’Brien can be heard deflecting another question from Pollak, saying “You know what, someone was talking in my ear, so I couldn’t hear what you said.”



**UPDATE 8:20 PM EST: Throughout the day, there have been numerous edits to the wikipedia entry for “Critical Race Theory,” including the elimination of “white supremacy” as a key element (an element referenced by Joel Pollak during his interview with Soledad O’Brien and the existence of which O’Brien scoffed at throughout their conversation). At the time of this update, there had been 26 changes today alone; up until today, the last edit had been mid-February, and before that, just one in January.

See screenshots of the changes here.

rebelpundit.com


Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

To: MJ who wrote (377)3/9/2012 12:02:57 PM
From: joseffy
   of 814
 
Soledad OBrien Melts Down, Ends Reputation As Journalist, Unmasks Herself For All Time As Leftist Propagandist

Soledad O’Brien Responds On Twitter To My Charges, Refuses To Answer Whether She Took Instruction From White House Prior To Joel Pollak Interview

March 9th, 2012 By Pat Dollard.
patdollard.com


Here’s my post from yesterday, which kicked this off:

Soledad’s performance here is absolutely jaw-dropping. This video could just as easily been headlined, “Soledad OBrien Melts Down, Ends Reputation As Journalist, Unmasks Herself For All Time As Leftist Propagandist” Joel Pollak handles the situation perfectly, staying on offense, and making all the right points. Joel had the following to say to me after I told him he had performed impeccably: “I thought of Andrew, and the rest was easy.” Perfect advice for all of us, going forward.

From Breitbart.tv:

Watch CNN’s Soledad O’Brien attempt to down-play the relationship between Barack Obama and radical racialist Derrick Bell. In the ultimate example of the mainstream media running interference for left-wing ideologues, O’Brien and her panel characterize Bell as just “a Harvard law professor,” they re-define critical race theory as a benign academic pursuit and, naturally, attempt to portray Breitbart’s Joel Pollak as a racist who is afraid of black people. Also notice how Ms. O’Brien confirms that the media has acted as gate-keeper on information about Obama’s past and determines what the public needs to know about him.


Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)

To: joseffy who wrote (380)3/9/2012 12:22:02 PM
From: MJ
   of 814
 
Link does not work on my system.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)


To: MJ who wrote (381)3/9/2012 12:25:35 PM
From: joseffy
   of 814
 
Try it again..

Well worth seeing.

A disaster for the sycophant "news" media.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)
Previous 10 | Next 10 

Copyright © 1995-2014 Knight Sac Media. All rights reserved.Stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes - See Terms of Use.