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To: Suma who wrote (5306)3/28/2012 10:10:48 PM
From: ManyMoose
   of 7038
 
Lindy Bill is right. It is Box. Not Fox. I think that's what I wrote the first time, but your post with Fox in it escaped my notice. I saw Fox and read Box.

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To: ManyMoose who wrote (5307)3/28/2012 10:46:05 PM
From: Carolyn
   of 7038
 
MM, I received my college alumni magazine today (Univ. of Kansas), and the cover is drawn by a Native American painter Brent Learned. He was chosen because of Chester Nez, author of Code Talker, and the last surviving WWII Navajo code talker. There are interesting articles about both. Learned paints Plains Indians (he is half-Arapahoe, half-Cherokee) and his connection to Nez is through Haskell University in Lawrence, KS. Nez graduated form KU in 1953. Knowing your interest in Native Americans, I thought I'd pass this along.

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To: Carolyn who wrote (5310)3/28/2012 10:48:37 PM
From: ManyMoose
   of 7038
 
That's excellent. Native Americans have a good art tradition. I have a couple of paintings and several carvings done by Native Americans.

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From: Glenn Petersen4/1/2012 9:49:12 AM
1 Recommendation   of 7038
 
Young Writers Dazzle Publisher (Mom and Dad)

By ELISSA GOOTMAN
New York Times
March 31, 2012

The television news feature about Ben Heckmann, an eighth grader from Farmington, Minn., was breathless in its praise. “At 14 years old, he has accomplished something many adults can’t achieve,” the reporter said. “Ben is a twice-published author.”

As the camera rolled, Ben described how “the first time I held my own book, it was just this amazing feeling.” Then he shared a lesson for others his age, saying, “You can basically do anything if you put your mind to it.”

But his two “Velvet Black” books, depicting the antics of a fictional rock band, were not plucked from a pile of manuscripts by an eagle-eyed publisher. They were self-published, at a cost to Ben’s parents of $400 — money they have more than made up by selling 700 copies.

Over the past five years, print-on-demand technology and a growing number of self-publishing companies whose books can be sold online have inspired writers of all ages to bypass the traditional gatekeeping system for determining who could call himself a “published author.”

They include hundreds of children and teenagers who are self-publishing books each year — a growing corner of the book world that raises as many questions about parenting as publishing.

The mothers and fathers who foot the bill say they are simply trying to encourage their children, in the same way that other parents buy gear for a promising lacrosse player or ship a Broadway aspirant off to theater camp.

But others see the blurring of the line between publishing and self-publishing as a lost opportunity to teach children about adversity and perseverance.

The young authors themselves, raised in an era of blogging and equal-opportunity Twitter feeds, take the notion of self-publishing in stride.

“The world is changing — it’s possible for people to do almost anything they set their minds to,” said Elizabeth Hines (pen name: E. S. Hines), a high school junior from Annapolis, Md., whose debut novel, “The Last Dove,” was recently released by the self-publishing imprint Xlibris.

She has other projects going, too. “The Black Panther,” part two of what she is calling the Trilogy of Aeir, will be published soon (at a cost to her parents of $2,700 per title). She has also written the first two books in a separate fictional quintet and begun a work of historical fiction set in 1500s Scotland.

Elizabeth’s parents debated the merits of self-publishing, said her mother, Jacqueline. Would her writing be criticized? Would she “get a little too much of a sense of self?” They finally decided that “self-esteem usually is not a bad thing for kids this age,” Mrs. Hines said.

Camille Mancuso, 12, of Columbus, Ohio, composed “Through the Eyes of Eak,” about the 72-year-old Delphi from the world of Phea, during breaks from playing Jane Banks in the touring production of Mary Poppins (by the time her book was published, Camille was on Broadway). Drew Beasley, 10, an Upper West Sider with an array of acting and voiceover credits to his name, published “Growing UP...With Jack” last year to inspire children to be kind to special-needs kids.

Mac Bowers, 15, self-published the 112-page “Running Scared” through iUniverse in February. The hardcover sells for $11.63 on Amazon, where it is described as a tale in which “two teenagers embroiled in a dangerous, international web of intrigue have just one goal — to make it out alive.”

Mac’s father, Timothy, a Pennsylvania schools superintendent, said that publishing his daughter’s work seemed a natural way to reward her months of effort.

“What do you do with something you’re proud of?” he said. “You want people to see it.”

Critics say it is wonderful to start writing at a young age, but worry that self-publishing sends the wrong message.

“What’s next?” asked the novelist Tom Robbins. “Kiddie architects, juvenile dentists, 11-year-old rocket scientists? Any parent who thinks that the crafting of engrossing, meaningful, publishable fiction requires less talent and experience than designing a house, extracting a wisdom tooth, or supervising a lunar probe is, frankly, delusional.”

“There are no prodigies in literature,” Mr. Robbins said. “Literature requires experience, in a way that mathematics and music do not.”

Garth Stein, author of the bestseller “The Art of Racing in the Rain,” said he saw how publishing could be great fun for children, but cautioned that “part of writing is living and exploring the world and interacting with the world.”

Alan Rinzler, a publishing industry veteran who now works with writers as an editorial consultant, suggested parents hire a professional editor like him to work with their child to tear a manuscript apart and help make it better. “That sort of puts a reality check on it,” he said.

Ben Heckmann’s father, Ken, said Ben’s aspirations “weren’t to knock Harry Potter off the list,” but “to get that good feeling inside that you’ve done something.”

“He can play basketball at home, or he can join a team; here he kind of joined a team,” Mr. Heckmann said. “This is Ben’s basketball.”


Ben’s mother, Julie, noted that while Ben has sold hundreds of books, the family could have simply ended up with a stack of Christmas gifts. “You can put your book out there, but it doesn’t mean people are going to like it,” she said.

Ben’s publisher, KidPub Press, which began publishing books by children in 2008, said most sales were made by the families, who buy the books wholesale. The founder and publisher, Perry Donham, said it was “pretty unusual” for a KidPub author to sell more than 50 copies on Amazon.

Some self-publishing companies charge upfront fees, ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars, for services that include printing, editing, jacket design and distribution. Others, like Lulu, offer to publish books free — though that does not include even a copy for the author’s shelf.

KidPub, which published 140 books last year, charges $250; that includes light copyediting, five printed copies and the promise of distribution on Amazon. “When the kids get the box of books with their name on it and they see their name on Amazon.com, they’re like little rock stars,” Mr. Donham said.

Kevin Weiss, president and chief executive of Author Solutions, which owns or manages 13 self-publishing imprints, said the company expected to publish more than 400 works by authors under age 18 this year.

“Today a 14-year-old author has as good a chance of creating a following as a 50-year-old author,” Mr. Weiss said. “And maybe a better chance because they understand the nuances of social media.”

Often, they do not need social media to spread the word.

Ajla Dizdarevic, 12, of Waterloo, Iowa, who has self-published two books of poetry, has been on television and in local newspapers. Being a published author, she said, “was always a dream of mine.” Her new dream: three books by age 15.

nytimes.com 

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From: Stan4/2/2012 10:09:31 PM
3 Recommendations   of 7038
 
PBS's "American Masters" is featuring Harper Lee in an hour and half show. Look for it. It's on in the Philadelphia area now.

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From: LindyBill4/11/2012 7:37:01 PM
   of 7038
 
U.S. Sues Apple and Publishers Over Pricing of E-Books

By JULIE BOSMAN 39 minutes ago

The Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit charging that Apple and others colluded to raise the price of e-books in 2010. Several publishers have agreed to a settlement.

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To: LindyBill who wrote (5314)4/12/2012 1:11:31 AM
From: ManyMoose
   of 7038
 
This mystifies me. Nobody paid more for a book than they were willing to pay. Unless there's something else, I don't see the problem.



The Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit charging that Apple and others colluded to raise the price of e-books in 2010. Several publishers have agreed to a settlement.

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To: ManyMoose who wrote (5315)4/12/2012 3:04:15 AM
From: LindyBill
   of 7038
 
You have to understand the Anti-trust act. This is the wrong place to discuss why I don't like it. But this shows just how upset the book market is.

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From: LindyBill4/12/2012 4:43:36 AM
   of 7038
 
Amazon to cut e-book prices, shaking rivals
The government's decision to pursue major publishers on antitrust charges has put Amazon, the Internet retailer, in a powerful position: The nation's largest bookseller may now get to decide how much an e-book will cost, and the book world is quaking over the potential consequences.

As soon as the Department of Justice announced Wednesday that it was suing five major publishers and Apple on price-fixing charges, and simultaneously settling with three of them, Amazon announced plans to push down prices on e-books. The price of some major titles will fall to $9.99 or less from $14.99, saving voracious readers a bundle.

But publishers and booksellers argue that any victory for consumers will be short-lived, and that the ultimate effect of the antitrust suit will be to exchange a perceived monopoly for a real one. Amazon, already the dominant force in the industry, will hold all the cards.

"Amazon must be unbelievably happy today," said Michael Norris, a book publishing analyst with Simba Information. "Had they been puppeteering this whole play, it could not have worked out better for them."

The government said the five publishers colluded with Apple in secret to develop a new policy that let them set their own retail prices, and then sought to hide their discussions.

As soon as the deal was in place in 2010, the government said, prices jumped everywhere because under the agreement, no bookseller could undercut Apple.

HarperCollins, Hachette and Simon & Schuster settled the charges Wednesday, leaving the other two, Penguin and Macmillan, and Apple to fight.

Amazon, which already controls about 60 percent of the e-book market, can take a loss on every book it sells to gain market share for its Kindle devices. When it has enough competitive advantage, it can dictate its own terms, something publishers say is beginning to happen.

The online retailer declined to comment Wednesday beyond its statement about lowering prices. Asked last month if Amazon had been talking to the Justice Department about the investigation - a matter of intense speculation in the publishing industry - a spokesman, Craig Berman, said, "I can't comment."

Traditional bookstores, which have been under pressure from the Internet for years, fear that the price gap between the physical books they sell and e-books from Amazon will now grow so wide they will lose what is left of their market. Stores of Barnes & Noble, whose Nook is one of the few popular e-readers that is not built by Amazon, could suffer the same fate, analysts say.

"To stay healthy, this industry needs a lot of retailers that have a stake in the future of the product," Norris said. "The bookstore up the street from my office is not trying to gain market share. They're trying to make money by selling one book at a time to one person at a time."

Electronic books have been around for more than a decade but took off only when Amazon introduced the first Kindle e-reader in 2007. It immediately built a commanding lead. The antitrust case had its origins in the leading publishers' struggle to control the power of Amazon, which at one point had 90 percent of the market.

Apple's introduction of the iPad in early 2010 seemed to offer a way to combat Amazon.

John Sargent, the chief executive of Macmillan, said he would not settle because he had done nothing wrong and colluded with no one. He wrote to his authors and employees that he made the decision to change pricing structure "on January 22nd, 2010, a little after 4 a.m., on an exercise bike in my basement. It remains the loneliest decision I have ever made, and I see no reason to go back on it now."

The government suit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District in New York, made clear that the publishers were resentful and angry about the way that their relationship with Amazon had evolved. The retailer started out a customer of the publishers but became a competitor. Even as the publishers and Apple negotiated in early 2010, the suit said, Amazon announced its own publishing program.

This only fed publishers' anxiety.

"I am now more convinced that we need a viable alternative to Amazon or this nonsense will continue and get much worse," the suit quoted David Shanks, the Penguin chief executive, as saying.

In the short term, readers will save money. When 16 states simultaneously sued Apple and three of the publishers Wednesday, they said consumers had lost $100 million as a result of higher e-book prices.

"It will look like blue skies," said Lorraine Shanley, a publishing consultant. "But in the longer term, competition erodes as the spread between e-books and physical books grows greater. There will be fewer retail stores."

Booksellers reacted to the news with dismay. The American Booksellers Association said the Justice Department's decision "to challenge a business model that played an essential role in fostering a more competitive, diverse retail environment seems to turn logic on its head."

Individual stores struggled to absorb the news.

"If there's an upside, I don't see it yet," said J.B. Dickey, owner of the Seattle Mystery Bookshop. "My fear is that the major publishers won't be able to stay in business just selling e-books. You can't bring in enough money to support the infrastructure. If that happens, there goes the marketing, the editorial, the author tours, the expertise of the book industry."

And his store, he added.

Celebrating Wednesday was Steve Berman, a lawyer who last summer filed a class-action lawsuit against the five publishers and Apple for price-fixing.

"The actions by the Justice Department substantiate our view of the case," Berman said.

The plaintiffs in the case are readers troubled by e-book prices.

"One consumer came to us and said, 'How come I'm paying $14.99 when I used to pay $9.99?"' Berman recalled.

Berman's firm, Hagens Berman, is in a Seattle office building that also houses Amazon offices. That has set off some speculation among Amazon opponents. Berman said the proximity was simply a coincidence.

"We have no relationship with Amazon," he said.

Amazon executives said that the future was open to the bold, but that certain elements would be left behind.

"Our mission is to reinvent reading," one executive, Russ Grandinetti, said in an interview. "I guess Kindle's not great for book binderies."

The retailer has been taking a more aggressive stance toward publishers in recent months. When it failed to get better terms from a large Chicago distributor this month, the Independent Publishers Group, it removed IPG's nearly 5,000 e-books from sale.

Curt Matthews, IPG's chief executive, said publishers who dealt with Amazon "will have to insist on keeping their fair share. It is obviously true that producing good content is the hard part of making a good book, no matter how that content is captured. Why should publishers cede all of their power to this new player in the book business?"

10
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Apple's introduction of the iPad in early 2010 seemed to offer a way to combat Amazon.

John Sargent, the chief executive of Macmillan, said he would not settle because he had done nothing wrong and colluded with no one. He wrote to his authors and employees that he made the decision to change pricing structure "on January 22nd, 2010, a little after 4 a.m., on an exercise bike in my basement. It remains the loneliest decision I have ever made, and I see no reason to go back on it now."

The government suit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District in New York, made clear that the publishers were resentful and angry about the way that their relationship with Amazon had evolved. The retailer started out a customer of the publishers but became a competitor. Even as the publishers and Apple negotiated in early 2010, the suit said, Amazon announced its own publishing program.

This only fed publishers' anxiety.

"I am now more convinced that we need a viable alternative to Amazon or this nonsense will continue and get much worse," the suit quoted David Shanks, the Penguin chief executive, as saying.

In the short term, readers will save money. When 16 states simultaneously sued Apple and three of the publishers Wednesday, they said consumers had lost $100 million as a result of higher e-book prices.

"It will look like blue skies," said Lorraine Shanley, a publishing consultant. "But in the longer term, competition erodes as the spread between e-books and physical books grows greater. There will be fewer retail stores."

Booksellers reacted to the news with dismay. The American Booksellers Association said the Justice Department's decision "to challenge a business model that played an essential role in fostering a more competitive, diverse retail environment seems to turn logic on its head."

Individual stores struggled to absorb the news.

"If there's an upside, I don't see it yet," said J.B. Dickey, owner of the Seattle Mystery Bookshop. "My fear is that the major publishers won't be able to stay in business just selling e-books. You can't bring in enough money to support the infrastructure. If that happens, there goes the marketing, the editorial, the author tours, the expertise of the book industry."

And his store, he added.

Celebrating Wednesday was Steve Berman, a lawyer who last summer filed a class-action lawsuit against the five publishers and Apple for price-fixing.

"The actions by the Justice Department substantiate our view of the case," Berman said.

The plaintiffs in the case are readers troubled by e-book prices.

"One consumer came to us and said, 'How come I'm paying $14.99 when I used to pay $9.99?"' Berman recalled.

Berman's firm, Hagens Berman, is in a Seattle office building that also houses Amazon offices. That has set off some speculation among Amazon opponents. Berman said the proximity was simply a coincidence.

"We have no relationship with Amazon," he said.

"Amazon executives said that the future was open to the bold, but that certain elements would be left behind.

"Our mission is to reinvent reading," one executive, Russ Grandinetti, said in an interview. "I guess Kindle's not great for book binderies."

The retailer has been taking a more aggressive stance toward publishers in recent months. When it failed to get better terms from a large Chicago distributor this month, the Independent Publishers Group, it removed IPG's nearly 5,000 e-books from sale.

Curt Matthews, IPG's chief executive, said publishers who dealt with Amazon "will have to insist on keeping their fair share. It is obviously true that producing good content is the hard part of making a good book, no matter how that content is captured. Why should publishers cede all of their power to this new player in the book business?""

economictimes.indiatimes.com 


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To: LindyBill who wrote (5316)4/12/2012 12:12:09 PM
From: ManyMoose
   of 7038
 
Please explain in an appropriate forum and put a link here. I'm sure we are all interested.


You have to understand the Anti-trust act. This is the wrong place to discuss why I don't like it. But this shows just how upset the book market is.

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