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To: J_F_Shepard who wrote (29882)2/22/2012 10:28:39 PM
From: i-node
   of 62372
 
>> If that's true it would essentially double the reserves of the USA........you standing by that statement?

Well, it isn't my statement to stand by or not stand by it, it is SWN's. But you apparently didn't get the meaning of the remark. There are an estimated 30B bbls of which an estimated 10% are recoverable, or 3B bbls. So, the increase in recoverable reserves from LSBD will be more on the order of 15%. Still not chicken feed. Of course, who knows. SWN could be wrong and they may not do any good. But I'm not quite sure why they said it if they didn't believe it to be at least on the right trail.

Regardless, there are numerous shale plays that are either producing good results or extremely promising. And the quantities are substantial.

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To: J_F_Shepard who wrote (29881)2/22/2012 10:29:20 PM
From: i-node
   of 62372
 
>> Are you trying to say CO2 concentrations observe national boundries????

No.

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To: J_F_Shepard who wrote (29880)2/23/2012 12:12:09 AM
From: teevee
2 Recommendations   of 62372
 
Vostok Ice Core data is good:

geocraft.com

and so is a brief history of Ice Ages and warming:

geocraft.com

Enjoy the interglacial warming while it lasts:-)
and here is a careful, thoughtful and math based analysis of recent satellite data indicating we are experiencing cooling:

noconsensus.wordpress.com

and in general:

noconsensus.wordpress.com

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To: Eric who wrote (29864)2/23/2012 1:33:29 AM
From: The Jack of Hearts
   of 62372
 
Eric like I posted upstream.. Iran cutting supplies to UK and France is symbolic... as Seven of Nine would say... irrelevant..



Iran has threatened to cut oil exports to the west and threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz through which one fifth of global oil supplies pass through - in bitter retaliation to the Iranian oil embargo agreed by the European Union.

The warning from Tehran comes after EU ministers agreed on Monday to stop any further oil contracts with the country with existing deals being allowed to run to July. The latest threats have added to an already tense relationship between the West and the Islamic Republic. Ian Traynor and Nick Hopkins have written:

Tehran threatened to respond by closing the strait of Hormuz, through which a fifth of global oil supplies pass, while a senior US official vowed that the west could use force to keep the route open.

The decision by EU foreign ministers in Brussels raised the stakes dramatically in the standoff between Iran and the west over Iran's nuclear programme.

The closing of the Strait would impact heavily on oil exports from not only Iran but also from Saudi Arabia - the largest exporter of crude oil in 2010. As the third-largest exporter of crude oil, Iran is also of major importance as would be the closure of the Strait of Hormuz which provided the route for 17 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2011 - totalling 20% of oil traded worldwide.

But where does Iran export its oil to? And how does Iran compare world-wide for oil reserves? The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide a thorough breakdown in their country analysis brief on Iran showing the top export destinations of Iranian oil, production and consumption over time and details on refinery capacity.

Click here to see the full screen version The top destination for Iran's crude oil exports in the six months between January and June 2011 was China, totalling 22% of Iran's crude oil exports. Japan and India also make up a big proportion, taking 14% and 13% respectively of the total exports of Iran. The European Union imports 18% of Iran's total exports with Italy and Spain taking the largest amounts.

Sri Lanka and Turkey are the most dependent on Iran's crude exports with it accounting for 100% and 51% of total crude imported, respectively. South Africa also takes 25% of its total crude from Iran.


more at ...

guardian.co.uk





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To: J_F_Shepard who wrote (29879)2/23/2012 1:57:16 AM
From: The Jack of Hearts
   of 62372
 
15 million years ago there were no humans... but...


You would have to go back at least 15 million years to find carbon dioxide levels on Earth as high as they are today, a UCLA scientist and colleagues report Oct. 8 in the online edition of the journal Science.

"The last time carbon dioxide levels were apparently as high as they are today — and were sustained at those levels — global temperatures were 5 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit higher than they are today, the sea level was approximately 75 to 120 feet higher than today, there was no permanent sea ice cap in the Arctic and very little ice on Antarctica and Greenland," said the paper's lead author, Aradhna Tripati, a UCLA assistant professor in the department of Earth and space sciences and the department of atmospheric and oceanic sciences.


more at... newsroom.ucla.edu

This entire warming debate reminds me of appeasing the thunder god under Niagara with an annual virgin sacrifice...

Maybe we are supposed to be warmer... and the Dutch were dumb to build below sea level.. Personally I like it colder... as I am a skier...

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To: J_F_Shepard who wrote (29882)2/23/2012 2:01:34 AM
From: The Jack of Hearts
1 Recommendation   of 62372
 
Horizontal drilling and multi fracking has doubled the Canadian non oilsands reserves... Probably better for the US... You guys got the best of everything :O)

Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) - Conventional crude oil in the WCSB has reversed its long-standing declining trend. Production is ramping up based on the successful application of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing methods to tight oil[3] reservoirs. Because this technology is in its infancy and the full impact on future production levels unclear, the incremental production volumes assumed in the projection are limited. Decline resumes in the 2015 to 2016 timeframe.

Government is Conservative... (That's a word game :O)
neb-one.gc.ca

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From: Eric2/23/2012 9:26:08 AM
   of 62372
 
Energizing Rural Communities

You may be aware of the environmental benefits of clean, renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar and geothermal, but these projects also give rural communities an economic boost. Counties and landowners in the Pacific Northwest are discovering the advantages of renewable energy development.
Sherman County is a prime example of a rural community that is reaping benefits by harvesting a new crop – the wind. Revenue from wind farms is helping to diversify this historically single-engine economy that is under increased stress from low wheat prices and decreasing harvests, and family farms are getting a boost.



This historically single-engine economy that is under increased stress from low wheat prices and decreasing harvests, but now family farms are getting a boost as revenue from wind farms are growing. Wind turbines are compatible with farming, occupy little land and can pay farmers many times what they earn per acre harvesting crops. According to Lee Kaseberg, a local wheat and wind farmer, the turbines are compatible with farming operations. “Put them up, we can farm around them easily,” declares Kaseberg. Maintenance workers access the turbines on his land via new roads put in during turbine construction. A neighboring farmer, John Hilderbrand, adds, “The new roads allow easier access to my fields. Plus, the turbines make money in the winter when I can’t work my land.”

In addition, wind farms add substantially to Sherman County’s tax base and help support essential services such as schools, fire departments and road maintenance.

Across the river, communities in Washington are seeing similar results. Just four of the state’s 11 wind projects provide enough clean, renewable energy to power 162,000 average Northwestern homes.

The benefits to the rural counties also include:
  • $996 million in new capital investment
  • Between $1.3 million and $2.1 million in annual royalty payments to rural landowners
  • Between $3.5 million and $4.0 million each year in local property tax revenues
  • Almost 700 construction jobs during peak construction periods
  • Over 65 new permanent family-wage jobs for operation and maintenance

Fossil-fueled power plants drain billions of dollars out of the regional economy each year to pay for imports of coal and natural gas. The wind that blows across the region is a free and truly homegrown energy source that keeps money and jobs in our communities.

Wind power development represents a major economic windfall for the region as they generate millions of dollars in new property tax revenue for counties, millions more in annual royalty payments for landowners and creating hundreds of new jobs, in addition to generating clean, homegrown, renewable energy.

rnp.org

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To: Eric who wrote (29890)2/23/2012 9:58:24 AM
From: i-node
   of 62372
 

$996 million in new capital investment
Between $1.3 million and $2.1 million in annual royalty payments to rural landowners
Between $3.5 million and $4.0 million each year in local property tax revenues
Almost 700 construction jobs during peak construction periods
Over 65 new permanent family-wage jobs for operation and maintenance


Damn. Reminds me of what happened in Haynesville & Fayetteville shale areaa (amongst others).

Everyone has to have energy.

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To: i-node who wrote (29891)2/23/2012 10:19:07 AM
From: Eric
   of 62372
 
Clean and sustainable for thousands and thousands of years..

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To: Eric who wrote (29892)2/23/2012 10:33:31 AM
From: i-node
1 Recommendation   of 62372
 
>> Clean and sustainable for thousands and thousands of years..

I can't imagine why anyone would object to renewables so long as taxpayers aren't paying for it.

Realistically, neither wind nor solar is a solution to electricity generation, and neither contributes in a significant way to transportation of people, goods or services. But to the extent renewables can be used to generate electricity cost effectively who could have a problem with it?

Unfortunately, these sources simply aren't ready for prime time. Maybe in 20 or 50 years, but they have to be cost effective. Solar isn't even close and who knows whether it will ever be.

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