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To: trooperp3a who wrote (1472)10/30/2008 12:09:27 AM
From: Salt'n'Peppa
   of 1644
 
Advanced ID Announces US$1.6 Million RFID Order from Chinese Homeland Security Equipment Manufacturer

Proprietary, Leading Edge Technology and Low Cost Internal Manufacturing Position AIDO for Continued Market Penetration in Asia for Tires and Other Applications.

AIDO trades at just 11 cents!

Calgary, AB, October 29, 2008 -- Advanced ID Corporation (OTCBB: AIDO), a leading developer of radio frequency identification (“RFID”) technology for livestock tracking, pet recovery and supply chain applications focusing on the tire management industry, today announced that it has received an order valued at approximately US$1.6 million for RFID products from Shenzhen Xinyuantong Electronics Co., Ltd. (“Shenzhen”). The one year contract requires Advanced ID’s new Chinese subsidiary to supply proprietary RFID technology and integration services for use within Shenzhen metal detectors.

Founded in 2000, Shenzhen is a leading provider of homeland security technology in China. The company has established itself as the number one supplier in the Walk-through metal detector segment. Through substantial investment in research and development since its formation, Shenzhen has developed 21 different variants of security products, including various metal detectors, intelligent digital X-ray detection systems, and innovative security devices for use in the transportation and entertainment industries, government agencies and other high profile locations.



Commenting on the first new contract secured by Advanced ID since the formation of its subsidiary in China and the subsequent acquisition of DDCT, Dan Finch, the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer, stated: “We are pleased to report firm orders that provide visibility for our financial performance in 2009 and our ability to successfully deliver on our strategy for market penetration of China, despite the concern regarding a global economic slowdown. Through our aggressive but cost conscious efforts in China, we anticipate making additional contract announcements in the near future that will further reinforce the execution of our growth strategy, the promise of our world class RFID technology, and the progress being made toward reaching profitability in 2009.”



Advanced ID’s subsidiary in China, Advanced ID Asia Pacific Ltd, was established in Hong Kong in June 2008, and augmented by its parent company’s September 2008 acquisition of mainland China-based RFID manufacturer, Shenzhen DDCT Technology Co., LTD (“DDCT”). A leader of new generation RFID technology in China, DDCT specializes in development, production, and sales of RFID/UHF hardware, including UHF readers, and antenna tags throughout Asia. The combination of these operations in China affords Advanced ID with a significant presence to offer RFID solutions for a myriad of applications in the tire, homeland security, retail, healthcare, manufacturing and other industries.





Manufacturing and R&D in Asia – Advanced ID on Center Stage



As part of Advanced ID’s corporate developments in China, its management has completed several international business trips to ensure a smooth transition and the establishment of regional strategies. Following the most recent visit, Advanced ID Chairman Seymour Kazimirski commented, “We are ramping up our capacity for a major increase in production of our proprietary RFID technologies. With both Company-owned and outsourced facilities, we are presently in the process of manufacturing in China and Thailand our own RFID tags in compliance with both the Automotive Industry Action Group guidelines to support our tire market initiatives and with global standards for all other applications.



“It is important to note that China is a focal point of our international expansion and represents a market in which we see great potential. A primary catalyst in China is the government’s support of RFID and the encouragement of investment in and use of this technology for security measures including the prevention of identity theft, for personal identification, product identification and quality control.



“While I was in China, I reviewed the Company-owned facility, which came to us through the DDCT acquisition and is now our manufacturer of record. At this facility, we will manufacture RFID tags for all major original equipment tire manufacturers which will be totally compliant and ready for delivery to customers around the world in early 2009. This timing is coincident with the target dates set by all tire manufacturers. In anticipation of this and through the international RFID tire tag distribution channels that we have in place, we are pleased to have already provided quotes for millions of tire tags that will be manufactured by Advanced ID Asia Pacific.



“We believe that significant and important strides have been made toward creating a self-sufficient, low cost manufacturer with proprietary technology to drive profit margins. Advanced ID is now well positioned to react in a timely manner to capitalize on RFID technology adoption and market demand in China as well as anywhere in the world.”



“In anticipation of the formal commencement of our manufacturing facility, the Board of Directors of Advanced ID and the Company’s executive management will be in China in November to conduct a press conference. It is expected that nearly 200 guests will be in attendance, including government officials, industry executives, supply chain representatives, trade and business media, and all of our regional employees. Further to our visit, we will be conducting for internal purposes a series of meetings and seminars for sales training, best practice manufacturing techniques, and operational coordination pertaining to all of our products manufactured in China and elsewhere.”





About Advanced ID Corporation: Advanced ID Corporation (OTCBB: AIDO) is a complete solutions provider in the RFID market with a focus on the tire management industry. The company is also a major factor in the tire inspection business through its UK based Pneu-Logic subsidiary. The Company is active in the pet recovery business through its AVID Canada subsidiary in Calgary, Alberta, and has developed a UHF RFID reader product line through its Advanced ID Asia Engineering technical support and business development partner in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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From: Pied Piper11/17/2008 8:37:27 AM
   of 1644
 
Sirit Announces European Certification for IDentity 5100 RFID Reader
Monday November 17, 8:29 am ET

High performance reader targets automatic vehicle identification market
TORONTO, ON, Canada; ITS World Congress, NEW YORK, Nov. 17 /CNW/ - Sirit Inc. ("Sirit") (TSX: SI - News), a global provider of radio frequency identification ("RFID") technology today announced during the ITS World Congress show in New York City, it has achieved European Telecommunications Standards Institute ("ETSI") certification for its industry leading IDentity 5100 reader.


The IDentity 5100 ETSI is ideal for long-range, high speed applications where vehicles may travel at speeds up to 100 MPH (160 KMH). It has been designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, temperatures, humidity and vibration, while providing optimal performance and security in European or other ETSI regulated regions.

"Open standards-based technology is leading the way in automatic vehicle identification ("AVI"), be it for electronic toll collection, vehicle registration or emissions control applications. Sirit is excited to bring the ETSI certified version of our flagship AVI product to serve the European and other markets worldwide," said John Freund, Vice President Sales, Sirit Inc. "The ISO 18000-6C technology that the IDentity 5100 is built upon is fast, adaptive, provides a flexible memory space and is capable of transmitting encrypted data, creating a solution which offers a superior balance of performance and price for AVI applications," added Mr. Freund.

The IDentity 5100 ETSI enables Sirit's integrated AVI solutions to serve the European markets in vehicle registration, vehicle emissions validation and insurance compliance, in addition to traditional AVI applications such as electronic tolling, parking and access control.

Sirit will be showcasing their industry leading IDentity 5100 reader in both FCC and the newly released ETSI versions at the ITS World Congress show, Booth 366, November 17-20 in New York City.

About Sirit Inc.

Sirit Inc. (TSX: SI - News) is a leading provider of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology worldwide. Harnessing the power of Sirit's enabling-RFID technology, customers are able to more rapidly bring high quality RFID solutions to the market with reduced initial engineering costs. Sirit's products are built on more than 15 years of RF domain expertise addressing multiple frequencies (LF/HF/UHF), multiple protocols and are compliant with global standards. Sirit's broad portfolio of products and capabilities can be customized to address new and traditional RFID market applications including Supply Chain & Logistics, Cashless Payment (including Electronic Tolling), Access Control, Automatic Vehicle Identification, Near Field Communications, Inventory Control & Management, Asset Tracking and Product Authentication. For more information, visit www.sirit.com.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Safe Harbor Statement under the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Except for the statements of historical fact contained herein, the information presented constitutes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Canadian provincial securities legislation. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, Sirit's objectives, goals, strategies, intentions, plans, beliefs, expectations and estimates, and can generally be identified by the use of words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "suspect", "outlook", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "forecast", "objective" and "continue" (or the negative thereof) and words and expressions of similar import, and may include statements concerning possible or assumed future results, financial outlook and/or future-oriented financial information. Although Sirit believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievement of Sirit to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements as a result of risks and uncertainties impacting Sirit's business. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations include but are not limited to: Sirit's ability to achieve commercialization and/or commercial acceptance of its RFID technology; the evolution of, and adoption rate in, the RFID market; changes in Sirit's strategic relationships; Sirit's dependence on resellers, distributors and significant customers; the utility of research and development expenditures undertaken by Sirit; product defects; increased levels of competition; changes in laws and regulations; foreign exchange fluctuations; and Sirit's overall liquidity and capital resources. These and other important risks are discussed in further detail in the section entitled "Risks Factors" in Sirit's Annual Information Form dated March 14, 2008 and in Sirit's management's discussion and analysis found in its 2007 annual report as filed with the securities regulatory authorities in Canada via SEDAR. Although Sirit has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Sirit does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this news release as a result of new information, further events or otherwise. This cautionary statement expressly qualifies the forward-looking information in this news release.

"Sirit", the Sirit Design and "vision beyond sight" are all trademarks of Sirit Inc. All other names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

For further information

Tawnya Clark, Sirit Inc., (619) 393-2645, tclark@sirit.com

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Piper

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From: Pied Piper11/17/2008 9:36:00 AM
   of 1644
 
Group Demonstrates 5.9GHz DSRC Packet Sniffer
Monday November 17, 8:46 am ET

<< Industry team demonstrates verification test tool that advances adoption of key VII technology >>
TORONTO, Nov. 17 /CNW/ - ITS World Congress, New York - Sirit Inc. ("Sirit") (TSX: SI - News), a global provider of radio frequency identification ("RFID") technology, today announced during the ITS World Congress show in New York City that they will demonstrate a Dedicated Short Range Communications ("DSRC") Packet Sniffer at the ITS World Congress using the event's "11th Avenue Theatre" Vehicle Infrastructure Integration ("VII") technology demonstration area.

The Packet Sniffer is a listening device used to independently verify transmitted DSRC data and protocols. The new test tool is the first device to verify IEEE 802.11p and 1609 standards based "Over-the-Air" transmissions. It incorporates the NTRU Aerolink(TM) 1609.2 Security and is the first OmniAir-Approved Test Tool. OmniAir's mission is to develop and offer the means to provide conformance, certification and interoperability test services to increase confidence in DSRC technology and its deployment.

DSRC Overview

5.9GHz DSRC is a compelling VII technology designed to provide standards-based, interoperable, low latency, highly secure, high-bandwidth vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications enabling a broad range of applications. Its development represents a critical milestone toward the realization of the combined goals of reduced accidents and fatalities as well as improved mobility - all on one platform. A prominent attribute of 5.9GHz DSRC is that it's based on open standards and can be built by any supplier. This creates a more competitive environment, improves contestability, efficiency, and innovation. Still, in the transport community funding is limited, particularly for new technology. For those working with tight budgets, OmniAir verification increases confidence that VII technology is performing as planned. This ultimately increases acceptance and in turn aids deployment.

DSRC Benefits

As an independent single-channel listening device, the 5.9GHz Packet Sniffer is a low-cost autonomous protocol analysis tool that verifies transmitted data against published VII protocols. The software runs on a Windows(R) XP laptop and captures and decodes over-the-air data packets. The single-channel radio listening device detects DSRC units within a short range and monitors either the control channel or service channel. It decodes WSA ("WAVE Service Announcement"), WSM ("WAVE Short Message") and UDP ("User Datagram Protocol") messages per IEEE 1609 and SAE J2735 standards along with embedded security certificates. If the data transmitted over the 802.11p radio does not meet protocols, the test tool reports the data seen and provides information on whether the data can be decoded properly. The Packet Sniffer represents a critical step for Sirit's customers by providing a low cost verification tool for OmniAir 5.9GHz DSRC device standards compliance program.

Sirit originated its work with the DSRC Industry Consortium with the responsibility of testing the developed technology against the emerging 5.9GHz standards. Currently, Sirit continues its RF Communications testing role in VII proof of concept development. Sirit participates in the IEEE and SAE standards development and several industry associations, such as IBTTA, ITS America and OmniAir. Sirit uses its field application experience to develop the RF test tools needed for the emerging 5.9 GHz DSRC technology.

Sirit will be performing demonstrations showcasing the full capabilities of the DSRC Packet Sniffer at 1:15pm daily at their booth No. 366 during the ITS World Congress show, in addition to static demonstrations of the packet sniffer during the show hours at both the Sirit booth No. 366 and an OmniAir members booth No. 849.

About Sirit Inc.

Sirit Inc. (TSX: SI - News) is a leading provider of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology worldwide. Harnessing the power of Sirit's enabling-RFID technology, customers are able to more rapidly bring high quality RFID solutions to the market with reduced initial engineering costs. Sirit's products are built on more than 15 years of RF domain expertise addressing multiple frequencies (LF/HF/UHF), multiple protocols and are compliant with global standards. Sirit's broad portfolio of products and capabilities can be customized to address new and traditional RFID market applications including Supply Chain & Logistics, Cashless Payment (including Electronic Tolling), Access Control, Automatic Vehicle Identification, Near Field Communications, Inventory Control & Management, Asset Tracking and Product Authentication. For more information, visit www.sirit.com.

About the OmniAir Consortium

The OmniAir Consortium is a non-profit trade association established to enable the national deployment of effective, interoperable 5.9GHz DSRC systems through the member-defined OmniAir Certification program. By testing for standard hardware and application protocols that together permit 'True Interoperability,' the Consortium seeks to ensure that all members - operators, application service providers, integrators, and the consumer - realize maximum benefit from their OmniAir-certified products in a reliable and dynamic environment.

OmniAir is intended to be the mark that confirms a DSRC system is compliant with industry-designed and maintained standards. This third-party certification will help advance interoperable, secure, and cost-effective vehicle-to-roadside communication systems, particularly 5.9GHz DSRC systems that operate in the frequency allocated by the Federal Communications Commission. The certification program is defined and maintained by OmniAir members and in the end, provides the transportation industry a clear means of identifying standards compliant, interoperable products. For more information, visit www.omniair.org.

About NTRU

NTRU Cryptosystems, Inc. is a leading security software and services provider to the platform and embedded security markets. Since 1996, NTRU has provided cryptographic products and services to major corporations in the design and integration of strong security solutions for their products in a wide range of markets. NTRU's core competencies extend from design and development of standards based security architectures and protocols to the cryptosystem design and implementation of security solutions based on the NTRU algorithm suite and other major algorithms. NTRU is headquartered in Acton, Massachusetts. For more information, visit www.ntru.com.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Safe Harbor Statement under the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Except for the statements of historical fact contained herein, the information presented constitutes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Canadian provincial securities legislation. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, Sirit's objectives, goals, strategies, intentions, plans, beliefs, expectations and estimates, and can generally be identified by the use of words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "suspect", "outlook", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "forecast", "objective" and "continue" (or the negative thereof) and words and expressions of similar import, and may include statements concerning possible or assumed future results, financial outlook and/or future-oriented financial information. Although Sirit believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievement of Sirit to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements as a result of risks and uncertainties impacting Sirit's business. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations include but are not limited to: Sirit's ability to achieve commercialization and/or commercial acceptance of its RFID technology; the evolution of, and adoption rate in, the RFID market; changes in Sirit's strategic relationships; Sirit's dependence on resellers, distributors and significant customers; the utility of research and development expenditures undertaken by Sirit; product defects; increased levels of competition; changes in laws and regulations; foreign exchange fluctuations; and Sirit's overall liquidity and capital resources. These and other important risks are discussed in further detail in the section entitled "Risks Factors" in Sirit's Annual Information Form dated March 14, 2008 and in Sirit's management's discussion and analysis found in its 2007 annual report as filed with the securities regulatory authorities in Canada via SEDAR. Although Sirit has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Sirit does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this news release as a result of new information, further events or otherwise. This cautionary statement expressly qualifies the forward-looking information in this news release.

"Sirit", the Sirit Design and "vision beyond sight" are all trademarks of Sirit Inc. Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows Logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

For further information

Tawnya Clark, Sirit Inc., (619) 393-2645, tclark@sirit.com

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Piper

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (1392)11/22/2008 4:29:50 PM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 1644
 
Digital Angel sells its Verichip stake to its former CEO and Chairman:

Digital Angel Agrees to Sell Its Stake in VeriChip Corporation

Thursday November 13, 9:46 am ET

VeriChip Shares and Related Assets Sold for Approximately $1.57 Million in Cash

SO. ST. PAUL, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Digital Angel (NASDAQ:DIGAD - News), an advanced technology company in the field of animal identification and emergency identification solutions, announced today that it has entered into a set of agreements to sell its approximately 45% stake in VeriChip Corporation, certain related assets and lease payments for about $1.57 million in cash. Of this amount, Digital Angel expects to retain approximately $420,000, with the balance to be applied to debt repayment.

Under the stock purchase agreement, Digital Angel sold all of its VeriChip stock, approximately 5.4 million shares, to R&R Consulting Partners, a company controlled by Scott Silverman. Under the asset purchase agreement, Digital Angel sold or assigned to VeriChip Corporation certain assets limited to the operation of the human implantable RFID business, including certain patents and other intellectual property, inventory and supplier arrangements. Further details of the transactions are set forth in the Company’s Form 8-K filing.

Joseph J. Grillo, Chief Executive Officer of Digital Angel, commented, “The completion of these transactions represents a major milestone for Digital Angel, enabling us to monetize our VeriChip holdings and to entirely divest ourselves of participation in a development stage business that, we believe, was going to require substantial investment to achieve success. We remain committed to our two core businesses, Animal ID and Emergency ID, and we look forward to devoting all of our resources towards the growth of those businesses.”

<snip>

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From: Pied Piper12/4/2008 8:36:49 AM
   of 1644
 

3M/Sirit mount challenge to TransCore supremacy in sticker tags
Posted Wed, 2008-12-03 21:59

A joint venture of 3M and Sirit is quietly mounting a major challenge to TransCore's supremacy in sticker tags for tolling and other motor vehicle identification. Since March 2008 3M and Sirit have had what they call a "cooperative marketing agreement" or deal to collaborate worldwide offering RFID reader/tag technology based on open standards - the ISO 18000 6C, a passive 865 - 928 MHz paper-thin transponder that will read and can be written to at full highway speeds. It operates at a range of 8 - 10m (26 to 33ft) and has a 724 bit memory and data transfer rates up to 640kbps - rather similar to the TransCore eGo sticker tag specifications which are based on an earlier generation of the same standard.

3M's Traffic Safety Systems division is marketing the product and will do most of the prime contracting. 3M also provides the flexible plastic sheeting and adhesive packaging and printing.

Sirit provides the chip/antenna assembly that is the working heart of the transponder and the overhead readers with the brandname IDentity 5100.

At the recent ITS Congress Sirit was showing IDentity 5100 tags that come in three forms:

- a windshield toll tag 67m wide by 25mm high (2.65" by 1")

- a registration sticker tag

- a tag nestling in an indentation in a license plate

The products are not yet on Sirit's or 3Ms websites but they give out flyers.

The technology is designed to work at 866 to 870MHz in Europe and at 902 - 928MHz in the Americas. The chip is a derivative of the product chain tagging technology intended for manufacture by the billions for use on consumer and industrial products in warehouses and retail establishments to replace barcodes. It uses passive backscatter in which the signal from the reader is modulated to respond to a query with data from memory and uses the strength of the incoming signal to send back data, therefore needing no battery or power of its own.

The Sirit relationship with 3M seems to displace an earlier relationship with TransCore in which 3M contracted to supply an island-wide electronic vehicle registration (EVR) system to Bermuda, the British island territory of 65k population on 53km2 (21sq miles) in the Atlantic off the coast of the Carolinas.

The Bermuda transponders are eGo tags and the readers are the Encompass series. The TransCore eGo tags are manufactured to the ISO 18000-6B standard the immediate predecessor to the 6C used by Sirit.

On their tag-reader system TransCore claims patents, while Sirit emphasize theirs are "open standard."

Sirit officials say TransCore's sticker tags are only a minor departure from the open standard of ISO 18000-6B via some modifications to timing. Antennas may also be engineered slightly differently.

6C chips have economies of larger scale

Sirit say they will be able to undercut TransCore's pricing because 6C chips they use are manufactured in far larger quantities than the 6Bs adopted by TransCore.

The first 3M/Sirit 6C toll transponders have been sold to a systems integrator in Brazil and are already deployed on some tollroads in the Rio area.

A Sirit official says they benefit from a major vehicle test facility owned by 3M and that the toll sticker tag is very thoroughly tested. Testing on registration sticker is underway while work on the license plate tag is at an early stage.

3M is thought to be bidding at North Carolina Turnpike with the Sirit 6C IDentity 5100 equipment, but the company's main focus is in getting states to adopt electronic vehicle registration on the Bermuda model. If sticker tags were adopted for vehicle registration toll authorities could probably make use of them also to identify vehicles.

TransCore selling more

Meanwhile TransCore steams ahead with sales of their eGo+ sticker tags. They have recently made sales to:

- North Texas Tollway, Dallas TX

- Louisiana DOT for the New Orleans Cresent City Connection bridges

- Kansas Turnpike Authority

- City of Laredo, Texas-Mexico bridges

eGo Plus technology is currently in use by Florida Turnpike Enterprise as an option for its statewide SunPass system, the Texas Department of Transportation’s TxTag, Houston’s Harris County Toll Road Authority’s EZTAG, Washington Department of Transportation’s Good To Go program, Oregon at the Bridge of the Gods toll bridge Columbia River OR-WA, Georgia Tolls on GA400, and Puerto Rico Highway Authority’s AutoExpreso island-wide toll system.

6B sticker tags are also used in the FAST border crossing priority program for secure vehicles on the Mexican and Canadian boders, for customs clearance in China, and for tolling in Jamaica on its Highway 2000.

TOLLROADSnews 2008-12-03

tollroadsnews.com

Piper

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From: Pied Piper12/4/2008 8:45:44 AM
   of 1644
 
Uruguay Deploys Sirit IDentity 5100 Based Tolling System
Thursday December 4, 8:25 am ET

<< Sirit equipment enables single centralized automatic vehicle identification solution >>
TORONTO, Dec. 4 /CNW/ - Sirit Inc. ("Sirit") (TSX: SI - News), a global provider of radio frequency identification ("RFID") technology, today announced that its IDentity 5100 readers and transponders have been selected for deployment on the only automated toll road in Uruguay.

Corporacion Vial del Uruguay ("CVU"), a government agency responsible for overseeing Uruguay's National Highway Concession program, has finalized plans to upgrade the Toll Collection System in all of the toll plazas operating in Uruguay, selecting Sirit IDentity 5100 readers and transponders, which are based on ISO 18000-6C open protocol and designed for long-range, high speed automatic vehicle identification ("AVI") applications.

The automated toll system installation is a cooperative effort between Telsis S.A, a Uruguay based company, and Telectronica (www.telectronica.com), a company with AVI installations in South America and Mexico, in conjunction with support from Sirit.

The selection process for the AVI system was managed by CVU, who conducted a thorough evaluation of potential AVI solutions and narrowed the equipment down to two suppliers. Both prospective systems were installed and comprehensive tests were carried out in the presence of officials and technical staff from each of the participating organizations. In the final evaluation, Sirit's IDentity 5100 solution was selected for its advanced performance and reliability.

"The selection of the Sirit IDentity 5100 readers and transponders as the solution of choice recognizes the superior performance of Sirit's AVI products and confirms the industry's move towards standards-based solutions for global AVI applications," said Wolf Bielas, President, Latin America, Sirit.

Phase one of the deployment included 12 readers and 20,000 transponders operating on Uruguay's main highway, connecting the City of Montevideo with the City of Punta del Este. At the completion of phase two of the installation by mid-2009, a total of 40 readers will be installed connecting the entire road system in Uruguay with a single centralized AVI system using Sirit readers and tags.

"What's exciting about the installation is the fact that Uruguay will be using a single RFID system enabling the use of the existing infrastructure and paving the way to deploying solutions for a number of other applications, such as parking, heavy vehicle weight systems and truck identification," said Edgardo Ventura, President, Telectronica.

About Sirit Inc.

Sirit Inc. (TSX: SI - News) is a leading provider of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology worldwide. Harnessing the power of Sirit's enabling-RFID technology, customers are able to more rapidly bring high quality RFID solutions to the market with reduced initial engineering costs. Sirit's products are built on more than 15 years of RF domain expertise addressing multiple frequencies (LF/HF/UHF), multiple protocols and are compliant with global standards. Sirit's broad portfolio of products and capabilities can be customized to address new and traditional RFID market applications including Supply Chain & Logistics, Cashless Payment (including Electronic Tolling), Access Control, Automatic Vehicle Identification, Near Field Communications, Inventory Control & Management, Asset Tracking and Product Authentication. For more information, visit www.sirit.com.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Safe Harbor Statement under the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Except for the statements of historical fact contained herein, the information presented constitutes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Canadian provincial securities legislation. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, Sirit's objectives, goals, strategies, intentions, plans, beliefs, expectations and estimates, and can generally be identified by the use of words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "suspect", "outlook", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "forecast", "objective" and "continue" (or the negative thereof) and words and expressions of similar import, and may include statements concerning possible or assumed future results, financial outlook and/or future-oriented financial information. Although Sirit believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievement of Sirit to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements as a result of risks and uncertainties impacting Sirit's business. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations include but are not limited to: Sirit's ability to achieve commercialization and/or commercial acceptance of its RFID technology; the evolution of, and adoption rate in, the RFID market; changes in Sirit's strategic relationships; Sirit's dependence on resellers, distributors and significant customers; the utility of research and development expenditures undertaken by Sirit; product defects; increased levels of competition; changes in laws and regulations; foreign exchange fluctuations; and Sirit's overall liquidity and capital resources. These and other important risks are discussed in further detail in the section entitled "Risks Factors" in Sirit's Annual Information Form dated March 14, 2008 and in Sirit's management's discussion and analysis found in its 2007 annual report as filed with the securities regulatory authorities in Canada via SEDAR. Although Sirit has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Sirit does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this news release as a result of new information, further events or otherwise. This cautionary statement expressly qualifies the forward-looking information in this news release.

"Sirit", the Sirit Design and "vision beyond sight" are all trademarks of Sirit Inc. All other names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

For further information

Tawnya Clark, Sirit Inc., (619) 393-2645, tclark@sirit.com

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Piper

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From: Glenn Petersen12/12/2008 3:33:42 PM
1 Recommendation   of 1644
 
Over five years ago Scientific American published an excellent overview of the RFID industry. Unfortunately, the piece has not been available online until just recently. While some of the information is dated, it is still worth reading.

RFID--A Key to Automating Everything

Already common in security systems and tollbooths, radio-frequency identification tags and readers stand poised to take over many processes now accomplished by human toil


By Roy Want

August 21, 2008

Editor's Note: This story was originally posted in the January 2004 issue of Scientific American.

Thirteen years ago, in an article for Scientific American, the late Mark Weiser, then my colleague at Xerox PARC, outlined his bold vision of “ubiquitous computing”: small computers would be embedded in everyday objects all around us and, using wireless connections, would respond to our presence, desires and needs without being actively manipulated. This network of mobile and fixed devices would do things for us automatically and so invisibly that we would notice only their effects. Weiser called such systems “calm technology,” because they would make it easier for us to focus on our work and other activities, instead of demanding that we interact with and control them, as the typical PC does today.

In a home equipped with this kind of technology, readers strategically placed in the bedroom, the bathroom door frame, the stairwell and the refrigerator would detect the identifying data in microchip tags sewn into your clothes and embedded in the packaging of foods and send the data to a home computer, which would take action based on that information.

The computer would notice as you got out of bed in the morning and would switch on the coffeemaker. As you entered the bathroom, the shower would come on, adjusted to your favorite temperature. When you started down the stairs, the preloaded toaster would heat up so that your breakfast would be done just the way you like it. When you opened the refrigerator, the appliance would remind you that you were out of milk and that the tub of coleslaw inside had passed its expiration date and should be thrown out.

Today systems based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology are helping to move Weiser’s vision closer to reality. These systems consist of tags (small silicon chips that contain identifying data and sometimes other information) and of readers that automatically receive and decode that data.

The responsive RFID home—and conference room, office building and car—are still far away, but RFID technology is already in limited use. The tags, often as small as a grain of rice, now hide in ID cards and wristbands, windshieldmounted toll tags, gasoline quick-purchase tokens, and electronic ear tags for livestock, and they have begun to appear in auto key-chain antitheft devices, toys (Hasbro Star Wars figures) and other products. They have also timed runners in road races, and last year a company in Mexico began a service to implant tags under the skin of children as an antikidnapping measure.

In the near term, RFID tags will probably be found in airline luggage labels (British Airways has conducted extensive trials), and they may eventually be embedded in paper currency to inhibit counterfeiters and enable governments to track the movement of cash. (Hitachi in Japan recently announced that it has developed tags minute enough for this application.) Meanwhile the retail, security, transportation, manufacturing and shipping industries are all testing or starting to implement sophisticated RFID applications.

But the RFID revolution is not without a downside: the technology’s growth raises important social issues, and as RFID systems proliferate, we will be forced to address new problems related to privacy, law and ethics. Controversy has already erupted: in mid-2003 two major retailers—Wal-Mart in the U.S. and the international clothing maker Benetton— canceled large-scale tests of in-store RFID-centered inventory control systems apparently partly as a response to public reactions that raised the specter of wholesale monitoring of citizens through tags embedded in consumer products.

The Inside Story

RFID TECHNOLOGY is based on the simple idea that an electronic circuit in an unpowered, or “passive,” tag—which requires no batteries or maintenance—can be intermittently powered from a distance by a reader device that broadcasts energy to it. So powered, the tag exchanges information with the reader. Tags essentially consist of a plain antenna bonded to a silicon chip and encapsulated inside a glass or plastic module.

Tags operate differently depending on several factors, especially the frequency at which they function. Initially RFID tags worked only at frequency bands of 13.56 megahertz or lower. Such tags, which are still the most widely used, typically need to be less than a meter away from a reader and offer poor discrimination (a reader cannot quickly interpret a multitude of individual tags grouped closely together).

More sophisticated, higher-frequency tags now enable a reader to quickly identify many individual tags grouped together, even haphazardly—although they are not yet able to distinguish perfectly among all the items in a loaded grocery cart. (The ability to swiftly and reliably scan a shopping cart full of jumbled, closely spaced RFID-tagged items is a major aim of this technology. Once perfected, such RFID scanning should streamline inventory and checkout procedures and save millions of dollars for retailers.)

The higher-frequency tags can potentially be read from much greater distances than their lower-frequency counterparts, although so far their range has been extended only to a few meters (largely because of tag electronics that operate at very low power derived from the reader’s signal, improved antennas and inexpensive high-sensitivity receivers). The updated tags can also hold significantly more information than earlier models, which allows manufacturers to incorporate useful data beyond a mere ID code. The tags can, for instance, use the energy they capture to power an onboard sensor. Tags with sensors that assess tire pressure and temperature while a vehicle is in motion are already in some cars, and Michelin, Philips Semiconductor and BMW are developing prototypes for the mass market.

RFID Now

RFID DEVICES are beginning to replace magnetic-stripe security cards for unlocking doors and granting access to secured areas—especially at facilities with special security needs, such as military installations. The most visible use of RFID, though, is probably the automatic tollpayment systems that rely on readers at toll plazas to scan tags attached to the windshields of passing cars. The reader records the tag’s ID and then deducts money from a prepaid account. These systems are designed to allow cars to zip through toll plazas ideally without stopping or even slowing down very much.

Known as E-ZPass in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and other states, as FasTrak in California, and by different names elsewhere, RFID-based automatic toll systems have been operating for several years. FasTrak, in place on the San Francisco Bay Bridge and on Interstate Highway 15 near San Diego, has been quite successful, but the East Coast E-ZPass system had some early teething problems related to administrative and political issues, not to the technology itself. The San Francisco Bay Bridge system requires drivers to slow to 25 miles per hour while passing the reader, but only for safety reasons, because the tollbooths are narrow. The FasTrak system on I-15, however, operates at freeway speeds and, further, is being used to monitor traffic.

RFID systems are also in the early stages of replacing those familiar Universal Product Code (UPC) bar codes, which are read optically at very short distances to identify products, track inventory and semiautomatize the checkout process at stores. RFID tags, unlike bar codes, can be molded into a product’s casing and can use encryption and other strategies to make them difficult to forge. In addition, some RFID tags permit readers to write new data to their onboard memories for later retrieval. For example, each transaction between reader and tag can record the time, date and identity of whoever accessed the tag. This capability should be useful for creating an audit trail in a tag attached to, say, a car, to indicate where it was manufactured and to record each time it was sold, its previous owners, its service history and its accidents.

Based on the growing number of business sectors that are beginning to test tagand- reader systems, some experts in the field believe RFID will be widely used, especially in retail, by 2010. Others say such broad application will not happen until around 2015 or later, when the cost of RFID tags falls enough to make them economically viable for labeling inexpensive consumer products.

The Near Future

RFID TRACKING technology is starting to be used to follow merchandise as it travels from factory to stores. It will probably be fully established for such applications before it makes deep inroads into stores proper, because warehouse systems are easier to develop and are less likely to fuel public concern that RFID tags in consumer goods could be used to monitor customers once they leave a store. Recently Wal-Mart announced that it will require its top 100 suppliers to place highfrequency tags on cartons and pallets shipped to its stores. And the U.S. Department of Defense has similarly called on its suppliers to adopt high-frequency RFID inventory labeling by 2005.

But the potential—and inevitable— uses for RFID in stores themselves remain tantalizing for retailers. The canceled Wal-Mart in-store test, planned in partnership with Gillette, would have evaluated the ability of RFID-based “smart shelves,” equipped with built-in readers, to monitor the movement of millions of shavers and other Gillette products embedded with RFID tags. (In principle, the 96-bit code allotted for identification of each RFID tag would allow every person on earth to have about 50 quadrillion tags apiece.) The ability to keep tabs on individual products on store shelves is generally accepted as the most difficult task for RFID technology—but one that could pay off royally for retailers.

Notably, RFID smart-shelf systems could save money on labor and help to increase sales by ensuring that shelves are always stocked. If the systems monitored stock levels, employees would not have to do it: when the computers sensed that stock was running low, they could automatically alert someone to order more or could place orders directly with the manufacturer. The systems could offer other benefits as well. Because inventory tags are programmable, their data can include information about where the item was manufactured and sold. And like pinnedon magnetic antishoplifting tags, the RFID inventory tags could be detected leaving the store to prevent theft (estimated to cost $50 billion a year).

Wal-Mart said it canceled its in-store test to free up resources for developing behind- the-scenes RFID capabilities in its warehouses, which will require fewer tags and less powerful computing. This is probably true; industry insiders, however, have suggested that consumer concerns over RFID systems invading individual privacy also played a significant role in the decision. That the backlash had an influence would not be surprising, given that it was at about the same time that Benetton aborted its own large-scale in-store test of an inventory system after its plans were criticized by consumers and the media. The Benetton trial would have examined RFID technology’s ability to scan entire cases of tag-bearing clothes in many different colors, sizes and styles and to capture and upload the inventory data to its tracking system, obviating the need for workers to hand-check each garment.

Other tests of warehouse and in-store inventory systems continue, by Procter & Gamble, Canon, and International Paper. And last spring, Metro, a German retail chain, opened a “future store” equipped with an RFID inventory management system involving both smart shelves and scales equipped with RFID readers that can identify types of produce. In addition, tagged shopping carts are scanned to measure in-store customer traffic and to signal automatically for the opening or closing of checkout stations. The Metro pilot is the work of Intel, where I work today, and the German software developer SAP, along with more than 30 other companies, including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco Systems and Philips.

Over the Horizon

RFID INVENTORY systems still fall far short of Weiser’s vision: they do not help us perform everyday tasks. Indeed, computers and chips scattered throughout our homes—in toasters, games, entertainment systems and other devicess—demand more, not less, of our attention. We must configure and control dozens of devices, transfer data between them, and try to figure out what went wrong when a failure occurs. Simple tasks, such as setting a wristwatch or operating a television, require an instruction manual. It is clear that for computing to become invisible, we need not only ubiquitous computing but what David L. Tennenhouse of Intel calls “proactive computing”— systems that anticipate what we need and provide it without forcing us to do a lot of work first.

For proactive computing to function on a major scale, networks of RFID readers must be placed throughout the environment. Forward thinkers envision two main types of proactive RFID networks, both of which include a web of interacting readers that monitor many RFID tags and convey the information they collect to remote computers.

One type is made up of readers set permanently in place and connected together by cables. These devices would power and read tags—some with sensors— that are also permanently fixed in place. (If necessary, the tags could also be read by mobile readers passing by.)

This kind of network might be installed on a bridge: tags would be buried deep inside concrete structural members, welded into joints between steel beams and put in other places where their sensors could measure stress and change in various parts of the structure. They would collect and store such information as the discovery that a structural member had been flexed beyond its safe limits during a seismic tremor. The readers would be powered from ordinary AC electric lines or through the interreader network cables and would be hardwired to an Internet connection, so they could send their data to computers that would analyze the input and take action in response.

The second type of system—called an ad hoc wireless network—does not have all its readers and sensor tags permanently in place. Instead it is made up of RFID readers put wherever they are needed, in the same way you would choose a spot to plug in a lamp. They read tags that surround them: some of the tags are fixed and stationary; some have sensors and some do not; and some are mobile, attached to devices and people that pass through the network. Readers may be AC-powered if they are near power outlets or may be battery-powered. These readers, also known as network nodes, can form short-range wireless connections to one another on the fly: information moves across the network by hopping wirelessly from node to node (which is why these are sometimes called multihop networks) and flows toward a gateway node with an Internet connection.

You might create an ad hoc network with many readers monitoring hundreds of tag sensors spread out across tens of square miles. Such a network could provide the data to make improved weather forecasts. If the sensors could simultaneously detect wind speeds at many locations across the whole area, the computer could even sense the formation of a tornado at an early stage and generate an earlier alert than is possible today.

An ad hoc RFID network in an office building could perform many tasks. Readers could monitor sensor tags that indicate the temperature in different rooms so that the central computer could maintain constant conditions throughout the building or on a single floor. Other readers would scan employees’ security badges and recognize the tags in their laptops so that workers could access centrally stored data or link up with colleagues elsewhere in the building. The design of all kinds of sensor networks is being researched by Deborah Estrin’s team at the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing at the University of California at Los Angeles, by David E. Culler’s team at the University of California at Berkeley, by Gaetano Borriello’s team at the University of Washington, at Intel Research’s Network of Labs, and at several small companies, including Crossbow in Santa Clara, Calif., Dust Inc. in Berkeley, Calif., and Sensoria in San Diego.

The Responsive Environment

WHEN RFID NETWORKS are finally in place everywhere and we are surrounded by tags and readers feeding responsive computer systems, we will have reached the point at which Weiser believed computing could be blended invisibly into everyday tasks. At this level of integration, RFID technology will support even our simplest activities. For example, RFID-enhanced computer products could “talk” to one another and independently configure their connections. My Intel colleague Trevor Pering has been exploring a way to automatically configure wireless network links between mobile computers and peripherals. If you purchased a printer with a wireless networking capability (such as Bluetooth) and an RFID tag, you might simply unpack the device and bring it near your computer: the computer would read the printer’s RFID tag and connect to the printer automatically, eliminating messy configuration dialogues.

The scope of possible RFID applications is vast and could even include assisting people with Alzheimer’s disease. Eric Dishman, also at Intel, is working on a system aimed at helping those with memory impairment maintain their independence. In one prototype system, all the objects needed for making a cup of tea are tagged. If the patient picks up at least two objects—say, a sugar jar and a tea bag— the system infers, by knowing the ID and location of the objects in relation to one another, that the patient needs help. The system also tracks the sequence in which the objects are used in order to infer whether the person is “stuck” and then delivers recorded voice assistance.

In a totally different realm, PSA Corporation, Hutchinson-Whampoa and P&O Ports—the three largest seaport operators in the world—have taken what could be the early steps toward developing an RFID-based antiterrorism security system that would outfit cargo containers with hidden sensor tags designed to detect radiation or chemical or biological agents in smuggled weapons. Right now the system can detect only whether a container has been opened by an unauthorized person during transit. It could be expanded so that at each stage of a container’s journey, from its initial site to ground transportation, dockside storage and transport ships, readers would interrogate the tag to determine if it had detected dangerous materials. The tag’s sensor would permanently register even very brief exposures to these substances and flag the incident at the next reading station.

Eventually PDAs (personal digital assistants) could be designed to operate as RFID tag readers so that we could receive proactive assistance from tags placed virtually everywhere in our environment. From a tagged sign on a train station, your PDA could retrieve a Web address linking you to an Internet-based timetable. Similarly, realtors could tag the signs on homes for sale: driving past, you could simply beam your PDA at the realtor’s sign and then download photographs and information about the property from the Internet.

Important technical challenges remain, and so it will be years, perhaps decades, before we can reap the benefits of such fully realized RFID applications. As RFID reader-and-tag networks begin appearing in our environment, however, we will increasingly see how this technology can extend the ability of computers—in combination with the Internet—to sense and respond to the physical world.

In his 1991 article in this magazine, Weiser wrote: “There is more information available at our fingertips during a walk in the woods than in any computer system, yet people find a walk among trees relaxing and computers frustrating. Machines that fit the human environment, instead of forcing humans to enter theirs, will make using a computer as refreshing as taking a walk in the woods.” Wielded sensibly, RFID has the power to make computing an unobtrusive, intuitive part of everyday life—indeed, as refreshing as a walk through nature.

Dealing with the Darker Side

WHAT WILL BE the social consequences of a world full of embedded RFID tags and readers? Will our privacy be further eroded as RFID technology makes it possible for our movements to be tracked and allows our personal information to be available in unprecedented detail? These and many other questions must be answered before RFID systems become commonplace.

One of the major worries for privacy advocates is that RFID tags identifying individual items purchased with credit or debit cards would link buyers to the specific items in the card’s or the store’s databases. Marketers could then use these data to keep track of exactly what particular people bought, down to the color, size, style and price—more information than UPC bar codes reveal. In an amplification of the way that phone and direct-mail solicitors use similar, less accurate data to target people for sales pitches, those equipped with RFID-derived data might home in on consumers with very specific sales pitches.

Another concern is that RFID equipment will produce automatic audit trails of commercial transactions: in a totally tagged world, it will be easier to detect when we lie about how we spent our time or what we did and where. This capability could have great consequences for the workplace, and the legal system might look to using logs kept by tag readers as courtroom evidence. We may need laws to specify who can access data logs and for what purpose. In Europe, the Data Protection Act already limits access to computer records of this kind, and the U.S. will probably enact similar legislation.

We will also have to grapple with the inevitable displacement of workers by RFID systems. Opposition to tagging could well come from the industrial labor force, which stands to lose significant numbers of jobs as industry adopts RFID tools able to perform tasks that now depend on human effort. A bitter strike by longshoremen on the West Coast in 2002, partly over new technology that threatened future jobs, may have been a preview of conflicts to come over RFID systems.

Privacy Advocates Protest

The backlash against perceived invasions of consumer privacy by RFID applications began in March 2003, when Philips Semiconductor announced that it was shipping 15 million RFID tags to the clothing manufacturer and retailer Benetton to be incorporated into labels during production. The tags were to interact with a network of RFID readers in Benetton’s store shelves and warehouses to track inventory throughout the company’s 5,000 retail outlets worldwide.

Despite Philips’s reassurances that tagged clothing could not be tracked outside Benetton stores, some industry experts said that criminals could increase the Benetton tags’ tracking distance by creating more sensitive RFID readers. Privacy advocates worried that the tags could be scanned by RFID readers other than those in Benetton stores, which would allow people wearing the clothes to be monitored without their knowledge by, say, criminals or the government. Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering, a U.S.- based privacy group, called for a worldwide boycott of Benetton until the company abandoned RFID tracking technology. Benetton quickly issued statements saying that although it had already tested RFID systems, it was not using RFID inventory tracking and had no firm plans to insert the millions of Philips tags into its products.

Similar concerns—that corporations might keep consumers’ products under surveillance in purchasers’ homes and on the streets—surfaced about a test of an in-store RFID inventory system that was planned by Wal-Mart and Gillette. To answer consumer concern, Gillette announced that it was embedding its RFID tags in packaging, not products, so purchasers would discard the tags with the packaging. But Declan McCullagh, a commentator who writes for computing publications and who favors RFID for its practical value, has written: “Future burglars could canvass alleys with RFID detectors, looking for RFID tags on discarded packaging that indicates expensive electronic gear is nearby.... [T]he ability to remain anonymous is eroded.”

One way to avoid such possibilities is to put a kill switch into each RFID tag on a consumer item, which would allow the tag to be turned off after purchase. Indeed, the Auto-ID Center—a research consortium funded by information technology companies and headquartered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—has released guidelines saying that retailers must be able to disable RFID tags at checkout counters, and manufacturers, including Alien Technology, Matrics and Philips, are now producing tags with kill switches.

McCullagh has suggested four requirements for the use of RFID tags on consumer products: Consumers should be notified when RFID tags are present in what they are buying (this could be done with a printed notice on a checkout receipt). All tags should be readily visible and easily removable. The tags should be disabled by default at the checkout counter. And, when possible, RFID tags should be placed only on the product’s packaging, not embedded in the product.

sciam.com

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From: Glenn Petersen1/21/2009 8:47:53 AM
   of 1644
 
A reality check from Sam's Club:

RFID non-compliance

Tuesday, January 20, 2009 in News

The Sam’s Club division of Wal-Mart has announced a dramatic decrease in the penalty fee it will charge suppliers who do not use RFID-enabled pallets to ship their goods. The change comes after major changes a year ago in Wal-Mart’s own RFID requirements.

The Sam’s Club plan originally required suppliers to be tagging the pallets of all solid SKU pallets sent to Sam’s 22 distribution centers by the end of January 2009. Suppliers failing to meet this requirement would be charged as much as $3 per untagged pallet. Now, with that deadline for compliance looming, Sam’s has reduced the per-pallet penalty to 12 cents, which is the cost for Sam’s to apply the tag upon arrival at the distribution center.

The change in policy appears to be due to multiple factors in the retail industry. With Wal-Mart itself easing RFID requirements, and no other major retailers introducing similar policies, few suppliers have reached the point that it is more cost-effective to invest in RFID infrastructure than to pay the Sam’s Club fees. Meanwhile, Sam’s own RFID investment has lowered costs to the point where tagging at distribution centers is a small effort, in terms of costs or labor. Apparently, this can be treated as another step in an internal labeling and tracking process already in place at the warehouses.

The policy change also comes as Sam’s Club’s own focus for RFID applications shifts from receiving from suppliers to store-related uses, including receiving, stocking, and inventory. This foreshadows another requirement Sam’s may soon put in place for suppliers: item-level tagging to aid inventory and eventually, RFID-enabled check-out.

rfidnews.org

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From: Pied Piper2/18/2009 8:42:03 AM
   of 1644
 
Sirit's Technology to be Installed on First T-21 Toll Road in Canada

<< New Golden Ears Bridge expands Sirit's western North America tolling stronghold >>
TORONTO, Feb. 18 /CNW/ - Sirit Inc. ("Sirit") (TSX: SI - News), a global provider of radio frequency identification ("RFID") technology, today announced that it has received the order for RFID Title 21 ("T-21") toll equipment to be installed on the Golden Ears Bridge near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Beginning in Q1 2009, Sirit will provide toll readers and transponders along with installation services for the Golden Ears Bridge Project which will link Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows with Surrey and Langley, British Columbia. The contract was awarded to InTranS Group (a CS Group company), a member of the V-Flow consortium, the project system integrator, who partnered with Sirit to provide the RFID toll technology. The initial contract is valued at approximately US$300,000 and includes T-21 lane equipment, lane level installation for six (6) high speed open road tolling lanes and 5,000 T-21 transponders. The customer plans to deploy in excess of 20,000 transponders in the first 12 months of operation.

"We are very excited to be part of this important Canadian project which will improve travel times and reduce regional congestion in the lower mainland of British Columbia," said John Freund, Vice President Sales, Sirit Inc. "It also represents the first RFID T-21 toll installation in British Columbia and Canada. By selecting our T-21 based toll products and leveraging our knowledge and expertise, InTranS will ensure delivery of a high performance, open standard, toll solution for their customer for many years to come," added Mr. Freund.

"We are excited to have won this project and are pleased to have Sirit on our team," said Michael Conlon, InTranS Project Manager. "Sirit has a strong legacy in tolling systems and unique expertise in the design, development and installation of T-21 toll technology. We look forward to working with them on the Golden Ears Bridge Project," added Mr. Conlon.

The Golden Ears Bridge Project is approximately fourteen kilometers in length and includes a six-lane, one kilometer-long span across the Fraser River, new arterial roads connecting the bridge to the existing road network on both sides of the Fraser River, and municipal road upgrades to improve traffic flow. Construction began in summer 2006, with a scheduled opening date of summer 2009.

The Golden Ears Bridge crossing will open up access to employment, markets, services, facilities and recreational opportunities and connect communities by providing new travel choices for transit users, cyclists and pedestrians.

About InTranS Group

InTranS Group is a leading ITS and Tolling Systems Integrator headquartered in Long Island, New York with offices throughout the US, Caribbean and North America. InTranS is a member of the CS global organization. With more than 3,000 employees in over 20 countries worldwide, CS is a major player in the design, integration and operation of high-performance mission-critical systems. CS - InTranS a culture of commitment. For more information, visit www.intransgroup.com.

About Sirit Inc.

Sirit Inc. (TSX: SI - News) is a leading provider of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology worldwide. Harnessing the power of Sirit's enabling-RFID technology, customers are able to more rapidly bring high quality RFID solutions to the market with reduced initial engineering costs. Sirit's products are built on more than 15 years of RF domain expertise addressing multiple frequencies (LF/HF/UHF), multiple protocols and are compliant with global standards. Sirit's broad portfolio of products and capabilities can be customized to address new and traditional RFID market applications including Supply Chain & Logistics, Cashless Payment (including Electronic Tolling), Access Control, Automatic Vehicle Identification, Near Field Communications, Inventory Control & Management, Asset Tracking and Product Authentication. For more information, visit www.sirit.com.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Safe Harbor Statement under the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Except for the statements of historical fact contained herein, the information presented constitutes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Canadian provincial securities legislation. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, Sirit's objectives, goals, strategies, intentions, plans, beliefs, expectations and estimates, and can generally be identified by the use of words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "suspect", "outlook", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "forecast", "objective" and "continue" (or the negative thereof) and words and expressions of similar import, and may include statements concerning possible or assumed future results, financial outlook and/or future-oriented financial information. Although Sirit believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievement of Sirit to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements as a result of risks and uncertainties impacting Sirit's business. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations include but are not limited to: Sirit's ability to achieve commercialization and/or commercial acceptance of its RFID technology; the evolution of, and adoption rate in, the RFID market; changes in Sirit's strategic relationships; Sirit's dependence on resellers, distributors and significant customers; the utility of research and development expenditures undertaken by Sirit; product defects; increased levels of competition; changes in laws and regulations; foreign exchange fluctuations; and Sirit's overall liquidity and capital resources. These and other important risks are discussed in further detail in the section entitled "Risks Factors" in Sirit's Annual Information Form dated March 14, 2008 and in Sirit's management's discussion and analysis found in its 2007 annual report as filed with the securities regulatory authorities in Canada via SEDAR. Although Sirit has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Sirit does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this news release as a result of new information, further events or otherwise. This cautionary statement expressly qualifies the forward-looking information in this news release.

"Sirit", the Sirit Design and "vision beyond sight" are all trademarks of Sirit Inc. All other names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

For further information

Tawnya Clark, Sirit Inc., (619) 393-2645, tclark@sirit.com

finance.yahoo.com

Piper

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From: Glenn Petersen2/28/2009 8:32:31 PM
   of 1644
 
Embedded chips to speed border crossings

By Elliot Spagat The Associated Press
Posted: 02/26/2009 04:26:59 PM PST



Howard Josephs, customer service manager for the Los Angeles Passport Agency, U.S. Department of State, holds up a new radio frequency enhanced U.S. Passport Card, right, and an older U.S. Passport, left, during a news conference held to announce the implementation of the new technology at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009. The radio frequency identification technology, which allows identification cards to be scanned from a distance, will be used in new passport cards, enhanced driver's licenses, trusted traveler program cards and border crossing cards. (The Associated Press)
__________

SAN DIEGO - U.S. authorities unveiled technology Thursday at the nation's busiest border crossing to read chip-enabled travel documents up to 30 feet from an inspection booth.

The system promises shorter waits but raises concerns about targeting by computer hackers.

San Diego's San Ysidro border crossing is a key test for the "radio frequency identification document readers" because the facility is used by about 150,000 people daily.

It's the 13th land crossing to get the technology in recent months, and Customs and Border Protection plans to have it in place by June at the 39 busiest crossings with Mexico and Canada.

The chips already are contained in about 40,000 drivers licenses in two Canadian border states - 32,000 in Washington and 7,700 in New York.

Arizona, Michigan and Vermont begin issuing the enhanced drivers licenses this year.


U.S. authorities said the technology will shave six to eight seconds off each inspection because information will appear on an officer's computer screen before a motorist even arrives at the booth.

That would be a welcome development at the 24-lane San Ysidro crossing, where waits exceed three hours in Tijuana, Mexico, during peak times.

"If you save a few seconds, you will reduce the (waiting time) enormously," Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Ralph Basham said at the San Ysidro crossing, where motorists flashed documents out their windows as they reached the front of the line.

Passport cards - a wallet-sized alternative to regular passports - are equipped with a different kind of chip that can only be read from much shorter distances.

Those chips are being installed on about 10 million "border crossing cards" for Mexican citizens who travel in border regions for short periods of time.

The chips are already on 520,000 "trusted traveler" cards for people who have undergone special background checks.




A driver holds up a new radio frequency enhanced U.S. border crossing card as she crosses the U.S.-Mexico border at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009. (The Associated Press)
__________

Some privacy advocates said the document readers lack safeguards, referring to a hacker who reported lifting information from travel documents in the streets of San Francisco with the aid of a $250 gadget.

"Someone with a fairly low-tech device, using off-the-shelf technology from some place like RadioShack, can snag (your information) out of the air," said Brock Meeks, spokesman for the Center for Democracy and Technology in Washington.

Paul Henning, a Customs and Border Protection official in San Diego, said an aluminum storage sleeve prevents people from stealing information. Travelers pull the document from the sleeve - one is provided by the government - when they cross the border.

Henning said successful hackers would only be able to lift an identification number - not personal information like name and address.

Kathleen Walker, an El Paso immigration attorney, said she hasn't noticed significant improvement in waiting times since the technology was installed in the Texas border city.

The document readers might help, but the only way to achieve shorter lines is adding more inspectors and vehicle lanes, she said.

dailybreeze.com

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