SI
SI
discoversearch

 Politics | Formerly About Advanced Micro Devices


Previous 10 | Next 10 
To: PROLIFE who wrote (646254)2/23/2012 1:33:01 PM
From: tejek
   of 812367
 
Jobless claims remain at four-year low

By Steve Benen
-
Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:40 AM EST

The general trend on initial unemployment claims over the last few months has been largely encouraging, despite occasional setbacks, and most analysts expected this morning's report to show a modest uptick in filings.

The good news is, that didn't happen. In fact, initial jobless claims reached a four-year low last week, and the new totals were unchanged this week.

Jobless claims in the U.S. were unchanged last week at a seasonally adjusted 351,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch estimated claims would total 353,000. Claims from two weeks ago were revised up to 351,000 from 348,000. The four-week average of claims, meanwhile, fell by 7,000 to 359,000, the lowest level since March 2008. The monthly average smoothes out seasonal quirks and provides a more accurate view of labor-market trends.

In terms of metrics, keep in mind, when these jobless claims fall below the 400,000 threshold, it's considered evidence of an improving jobs landscape. When the number drops below 370,000, it suggests jobs are actually being created rather quickly.

We've now dropped below 370,000 for three consecutive weeks, and four of the last six weeks.

And with that, here's the chart, showing weekly, initial unemployment claims going back to the beginning of 2007. (Remember, unlike the monthly jobs chart, a lower number is good news.) For context, I've added an arrow to show the point at which President Obama's Recovery Act began spending money.



Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


To: PROLIFE who wrote (646254)2/23/2012 1:33:03 PM
From: tejek
1 Recommendation   of 812367
 
Jobless claims remain at four-year low

By Steve Benen
-
Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:40 AM EST

The general trend on initial unemployment claims over the last few months has been largely encouraging, despite occasional setbacks, and most analysts expected this morning's report to show a modest uptick in filings.

The good news is, that didn't happen. In fact, initial jobless claims reached a four-year low last week, and the new totals were unchanged this week.

Jobless claims in the U.S. were unchanged last week at a seasonally adjusted 351,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch estimated claims would total 353,000. Claims from two weeks ago were revised up to 351,000 from 348,000. The four-week average of claims, meanwhile, fell by 7,000 to 359,000, the lowest level since March 2008. The monthly average smoothes out seasonal quirks and provides a more accurate view of labor-market trends.

In terms of metrics, keep in mind, when these jobless claims fall below the 400,000 threshold, it's considered evidence of an improving jobs landscape. When the number drops below 370,000, it suggests jobs are actually being created rather quickly.

We've now dropped below 370,000 for three consecutive weeks, and four of the last six weeks.

And with that, here's the chart, showing weekly, initial unemployment claims going back to the beginning of 2007. (Remember, unlike the monthly jobs chart, a lower number is good news.) For context, I've added an arrow to show the point at which President Obama's Recovery Act began spending money.



Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)


To: PROLIFE who wrote (646254)2/23/2012 1:35:39 PM
From: tejek
   of 812367
 
ooops....John King just another jester in obama's sack of media jesters..

Newt Slams John King: No One In "Elite Media" Asked Obama About Infanticide
Real'>http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2012/02/22/newt_slams_john_king_no_one_in_elite_media_asked_o... Clear Politics ^


Newt Gingrich took debate moderator John King to task for asking the candidates about contraception. Gingrich said King and the rest of the "elite media" did not bother to ask the 2008 Democratic candidates about "infanticide."

Typical R nonsense these days.........blaming everyone else for why you all are so unpopular. Let me clarify for you...........you all are so unpopular for a number of reasons........GW Bush, R incompetence, R immorality, R corruption, R love with the 1% and because Rs are so out of step with the rest of the population.

Now carry on..........................

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (3)


To: i-node who wrote (646246)2/23/2012 1:37:43 PM
From: tejek
   of 812367
 
If anything shows CBO is in the tank for Obama and not the "nonpartisan" organization they're always claimed to be, this is it.

Of course. Everyone loves Obama and is against the Rs:



I have never seen a group that plays victim as much as Rs do.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


To: i-node who wrote (646246)2/23/2012 1:47:32 PM
From: tejek
   of 812367
 
And I want to know what you all have done to the US Post Office. Its falling apart and has the smell of Republican BS to it.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


From: bentway2/23/2012 2:09:03 PM
   of 812367
 
As Contraception Fight Takes Center Stage, Women Voters Turning From Romney
Kyle Leighton
February 23, 2012, 6:02 AM

The political returns from attacking access to contraception are in. Women don’t seem to like it.

While Republican frontrunner Mitt Romney hasn’t led the charge against the Obama Administration’s proposed new federal rules that require an insurance carrier to provide birth control free of charge to women, he certainly echoed the theme that the new rules are an assault on religious liberty, while steering clear of making it a central issue on the campaign.

Unfortunately for him, it seems he’s still suffered a precipitous drop in support among women voters.

Quinnipiac University released new numbers on Wednesday that showed a troubling trend for the former governor. In three months, he’d gone from a positive split on favorability with women (33 - 30) to a substantially negative one (30 - 45) in Quinnipiac’s numbers.

The pollster also asked whether “Mitt Romney cares about the needs and problems of women or not?” while asking the same about President Obama. Obama did very well on the question, with 64 percent of all voters saying he does and 28 saying he does not, nearly exactly the same as the split amongst women themselves. Romney earned a 41 - 41 split on the question from all voters, while only 34 percent of women said that he does care about their needs and problems, with 46 percent saying he does not.

Check out the chart below of the widening gap when it comes to candidate favorability amongst women. It was essentially even, with a slight advantage to Obama, until the Republican primary process began and the recent debate over contraception.



And yet, the new Quinnipiac numbers show Romney coming within two points of Obama in a national matchup, 46 - 44, with the President’s lead essentially built on having a slightly bigger advantage with women as Romney does with men. Even with these divisions, says Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, partisans of all types will recede into their corners come November.

“Republicans are going to vote against President Obama this year — he’s a turnout vehicle,” Brown told TPM. On national favorability, Brown said Romney’s not doing very well at the moment, and he’ll run better with women than some of the more conservative candidates. “But at this point, national polls follow state results. If Romney wins in Michigan and Arizona, his numbers will go up.”

Democratic pollster and President of Momentum Analysis, Margie Omero, doesn’t disagree that the 2012 race will be difficult for her side, even if the current state of the Republican race is causing problems for the GOP. “We shouldn’t expect a race to change based on a week or two of back and forth on women’s issues,” she told TPM. But on the contraception debate, she said the whole attack is a bit puzzling. “I don’t know where the they think the electoral advantage is on this. These are things that have been decided a long time ago.”

So why are Romney’s numbers with women dropping, even though he hasn’t been front and center in the recent debates? It’s association, said Oremo. “Romney may not be leading the charge, but he’s not telling people to back off,” she said.

The TPM Poll Average of an Obama—Romney matchup over the same time period.

2012.talkingpointsmemo.com

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


From: bentway2/23/2012 2:09:48 PM
   of 812367
 
The GOP’s Real Tax Cut Goal Has Nothing To Do With The Middle Class
Brian Beutler
February 23, 2012, 5:50 AM

You’d think that with the economy growing, and indeed accelerating in its growth, the GOP would be setting itself up to claim all the credit come November — rather than reluctantly embracing President Obama’s call for a payroll tax cut, while talking down its efficacy as a tonic for the job market.

Instead they’re obstinately digging in. And with all of the party’s presidential hopefuls lukewarm on the payroll tax cut and leapfrogging each other with plans to cut taxes for wealthy Americans alone, Republicans are inadvertently clarifying for voters what they know to be unpopular economic policies.

“Let’s be honest, this is an economic relief package, not a bill that’s going to grow the economy and create jobs,” said House Speaker John Boehner last week in a statement ahead of the passage of the payroll tax cut deal.

The package itself won a modest majority of Republican votes in the House and a significant minority of Republican votes in the Senate. But both stand in complete agreement with the GOP presidential field on the need to enact large, permanent tax cuts for the highest earners in the country. This is what Mitt Romney refers to as pro-growth tax policy. So to give you a clearer sense of what the GOP would have rather done than renew the payroll tax cut, here’s a graphical breakdown.



A couple quick notes on this. First, this chart was compiled before Romney introduced a new tax framework that lacks key details and hasn’t been subjected to the Tax Policy Center’s rigorous analysis. We’ve included his original plan, which includes many features in common with the plan his campaign introduced Wednesday.

You’ll also notice that topmost line in this graph plots average tax rates under current law — i.e. if all the Bush cuts and other tax provisions expire at the end of the year. That baseline makes it appear as if the leading candidates want to give everybody a significant tax cut. The more appropriate baseline is current policy — the dark blue line. All the GOP candidates want to lock in the Bush tax rates, and then cut from there. Using that standard, you see that none of the candidates, but particularly Romney, want to do very much at all to reduce the tax burden for the middle class. Those lines only really start to diverge at incomes around $200,000 annually. It’s textbook supply-siderism, but that’s the segment of earners whose taxes the GOP really wants to cut.

tpmdc.talkingpointsmemo.com

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


From: bentway2/23/2012 2:10:42 PM
   of 812367
 
Four white wealthy men talk about contraception
By Steve Benen
Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:00 AM EST

About half-way through last night's debate, moderator John King presented a question for the four candidates sent in from a viewer: "Since birth control is the latest hot topic, which candidate believes in birth control, and if not, why?"

The question was not well received by the audience, which booed for quite a while. Opinions vary as to why, exactly, attendees responded so negatively, though I suspect it was because the audience saw this as an unnecessary area of discussion.

King, noticing the prevailing winds, immediately told the Republican presidential field, "Look, we're not going to spend a ton of time on this." The candidates had other ideas.

The ensuing discussion was one of the longest of the entire two-hour debate. Rick Santorum wanted to talk about "the increasing number of children being born out of wedlock in America" and "children being raised by children." Ron Paul spent some time explaining his belief that "immorality creates the problem" of Americans wanting access to birth control. The discussion just wouldn't end, moving from Title X to Arlen Specter to morning-after pills.

You could almost hear the smiles coming from Obama campaign headquarters in Chicago. In the 21st century, four far-right white wealthy guys, all of whom think they should be president, spent 15 minutes in a nationally-televised debate talking about access to birth control.

The GOP candidates might as well have put a banner over their heads reading, "Independents, please don't consider voting for us."

But it was Mitt Romney's response to the question that amazed me. "I don't think we've seen in the history of this country the kind of attack on religious conscience, religious freedom, religious tolerance that we've seen under Barack Obama," the former governor said.

Think about that one for a moment. The Obama administration is including contraception coverage as part of preventive health care for Americans -- a decision a clear majority of the country heartily supports. The administration is exempting churches and other houses of worship, and has crafted a compromise so that religiously-affiliated employers will not have to pay for contraception coverage directly.

This is the biggest "attack" on religious freedom in the history of the United States? How is it, exactly, that a sane person could believe this?

Or more to the point, how is it that a Mormon, whose church faced actual attacks and discrimination, could see contraception access as a more serious assault on "religious tolerance"?

Romney added that Obama is "requiring the Catholic Church to provide for its employees and its various enterprises health care insurance that would include birth control, sterilization and the morning-after pill. Unbelievable."

It is, in fact, literally "unbelievable," since that's not at all what the administration is doing.

It was painful enough to have so much of the debate focus on opposition to birth control, but Romney's dishonesty managed to make a mind-numbing discussion even worse.

maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (3)


To: bentway who wrote (646272)2/23/2012 2:15:37 PM
From: joseffy
   of 812367
 
bentway posts Steve Benen from the Maddow blog.

Good boy, bentway.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)


To: tejek who wrote (646266)2/23/2012 2:17:02 PM
From: joseffy
   of 812367
 
tejek posts Steve Benen from the Maddow blog.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)
Previous 10 | Next 10 

Copyright © 1995-2014 Knight Sac Media. All rights reserved.Stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes - See Terms of Use.