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From: Eric L3/7/2012 7:49:45 AM
1 Recommendation   of 9176
 
AAWP & AAS at MWC 2012

Rafe Blanford attended and he joins his mates in this pair of podcasts ...

AAWP Insight #17: MWC 2012

allaboutwindowsphone.com

In this podcast the "All About Windows Phone" team covers:

• The Skype Beta available for Windows Phone

• Nokia Transport in beta (app link) and mention of Next Bus UK

• Nokia Reading

• ZTE Orbit

• Nokia Lumia 610

• Nokia Lumia 900 Global Edition

###

AAS Insight #205: Nokia 808 PureView and MWC 2012

allaboutsymbian.com

The same team wearing their "All About Symbian" (AAS) hats discuss the Symbian-related news from Mobile World Congress:

• Nokia 808 PureView

--> PureView camera

--> Rich Recording audio

--> The phone

• Nokia Belle Feature Pack 1

• Nokia NFC demos

• Thoughts on Nokia Belle in the real world

###

- Eric -

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From: Eric L3/7/2012 10:04:10 AM
   of 9176
 
Developing PureView Technology (The story behind it) ...

Message 27995117

- Eric

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From: Eric L3/7/2012 10:46:27 AM
   of 9176
 
Expanding the San Diego Nokia Smart Devices Team ...

... by 100 employees.

On March 15, 2012 in San Diego, California, Nokia will hold a recruitment event that will open opportunities for more than 100 folks to join the Smart devices team within a two week period. This ramping up could be a huge boon to the local economy of San Diego, as it represents a $10 million+ investment annually in Nokia’s Rancho Bernardo location.

- Eric -

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From: Eric L3/7/2012 11:50:58 AM
1 Recommendation   of 9176
 
NSN's Expedience Fixed-Wireless Broadband business Acquired ...

>> CN TETRAGEN acquires Nokia Siemens Networks’ Expedience business

Nokia Siemens Networks and CN TETRAGEN Press Release
Espoo, Finland / Madrid, Spain
March 7, 2012

nokiasiemensnetworks.com

CN TETRAGEN, a privately held Spanish technology holding, has acquired Nokia Siemens Networks’ proprietary, fixed-wireless broadband business, Expedience¹. Under the terms of the transaction, CN TETRAGEN acquired the complete Expedience portfolio, assets, and the active customer and supplier contracts. The Expedience business is not part of Nokia Siemens Networks’ mobile broadband portfolio based on widely adopted industry standards.

¹ NSN acquired the Expedience portfolio as part of its acquisition of certain Motorola Solutions networks assets that closed in April 2011. Expedience is a proprietary wireless broadband platform with system components that include residential subscriber units, mobile subscriber units, outdoor subscriber units, base stations and network management technology. It is available in 2.5, 3.3, 3.5 and 3.7 GHz licensed frequency bands. To date more than 15,000 base stations and 700,000 CPEs have been sold worldwide.

CN TETRAGEN has in-depth knowledge of the Expedience portfolio and recognizes an opportunity to provide outstanding products and services to the operators who have invested in the technology. CN TETRAGEN has set up a company called Nexpedience Networks to operate the Expedience assets.

“With this acquisition, we are in a good position to ensure continuity for the manufacturing of the Expedience technology while developing a solid roadmap for its future. We are extremely committed to achieving this,” said Kiriako Vergos, chairman and CEO of CN TETRAGEN.

“We believe our customers will benefit from the greater focus, scale and concentration on Expedience that CN TETRAGEN can offer,” said Stephan Scholz, head of divestment projects for Network Systems, Nokia Siemens Networks. “The divestment is part of Nokia Siemens Networks new strategy where we’ll focus on mobile broadband and services.”

About Nokia Siemens Networks: Nokia Siemens Networks is the world’s specialist in mobile broadband. From the first ever call on GSM, to the first call on LTE, we operate at the forefront of each generation of mobile technology. Our global experts invent the new capabilities our customers need in their networks. We provide the world’s most efficient mobile networks, the intelligence to maximize the value of those networks, and the services to make it all work seamlessly. With headquarters in Espoo, Finland, we operate in over 150 countries and had net sales of over 14 billion euros in 2011. nokiasiemensnetworks.com

About CN TETRAGEN: CN TETRAGEN has been active in the field of ‘NextGen’ BWA technologies since 2004. The company’s headquarters are in Madrid, SPAIN. codiumtetragen.com

- Eric -

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From: Eric L3/8/2012 11:00:48 AM
1 Recommendation   of 9176
 
Nokia's US SEC 20-F for 2011

Nokia filed its annual report on Form 20-F for 2011 with the US Securities and Exchange Commission today. The report is available in pdf format here ...

i.nokia.com

- Eric -

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To: Eric L who wrote (6985)3/8/2012 11:08:11 AM
From: Eric L
1 Recommendation   of 9176
 
NSN's Sale of Motorola Networks proprietary 'Expedience' fixed wireless business (adds color) ...

In addition to 'Expedience' NSN has already offloaded several units - WiMAX to NewNet Communications, broadband to Adtran and microwave backhaul to DragonWave. Also on the block is its BSS (business support systems) unit, whose main products are the 'charge@once unified' billing/charging engine and the legacy prepaid charging product, 'charge@once select'.

>> NSN Sells Another Relic of Motorola Networks

Offloads proprietary fixed wireless unit, Expedience, to Spanish specialist CN Tetragen as it continues to refocus

Caroline Gabriel
Rethink Wireless
8 March, 2012

rethink-wireless.com

Nokia Siemens continues to offload its non-core businesses, the latest being its Expedience fixed wireless business, which it is selling to Spanish broadband wireless access (BWA) specialist CN Tetragen.

Expedience is a relic of the days when most of the vendors had a proprietary fixed wireless offering targeted at wireless local loop or DSL alternative applications, especially in emerging markets. The space was largely overtaken by the standards-based BWA technology WiMAX, which continues to dominate the area despite its failure in the mobile world, and suppliers like Alvarion have gradually moved away from their proprietary platforms. NSN has already sold its own WiMAX business, acquired along with Motorola Networks, to NewNet Communications.

Expedience also came NSN's way with the Motorola purchase, and the US firm had itself bought the product range along with mobile broadband innovator NextNet in 2006. NextNet was the original supplier to Clearwire, before the operator merged with Sprint's WiMAX business and moved to standards-based platforms.

CN Tetragen has acquired Expediences assets plus its active customer and supplier contracts, and has set up a dedicated unit, Nexpedience Networks, to run the business. The Spanish company said it has in-depth knowledge of the Expedience portfolio and "recognizes an opportunity to provide outstanding products and services to the operators who have invested in the technology".

"With this acquisition, we are in a good position to ensure continuity for the manufacturing of the Expedience technology while developing a solid roadmap for its future," said the company's CEO Kiriako Vergos, while NSN said customers would benefit from the "greater focus, scale and concentration" of a specialized vendor.

NSN has already offloaded several units - WiMAX to NewNet Communications, broadband to Adtran and microwave backhaul to DragonWave. Also on the block is its BSS (business support systems) unit, whose main products are the 'charge@once unified' billing/charging engine and the legacy prepaid charging product, 'charge@once select'. ###

- Eric -

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To: Eric L who wrote (6979)3/8/2012 5:05:18 PM
From: waitwatchwander
   of 9176
 
---> Nokia World in Hel-sink-i

Another sign of retrenchment and the shoring up of a burned out platform? I would have thought Nokia would be making greater strides forward by now. Everything worthwhile does take time but one has to figure that time isn't something that's on Nokia's side, these days.

I sure didn't get the PureView buzz because, to me, having all those extra pixels to digest just means it's going to take even more processing power to apply artificial inteligence to whatever image gets captured. It all seemed like nothing but a Red Herring to distract folks from slow progress being made elsewhere. Even Naveteq seems to be withering these days.

Hopefully, they've just gone into super stealth mode because it would be a shame to see Nokia consolidated along with all the other also ran.

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To: Eric L who wrote (6986)3/9/2012 2:50:08 PM
From: Eric L
1 Recommendation   of 9176
 
AAWP Comments on Nokia's 2011 20-F Item 1 § D (Risk Factors) ...

In Nokia's 2011 20-F filing with the US SEC Item 1 § D (Risk Factors) which occupies 33 of its 296 pages (pages 13 to 46) is extremely comprehensive and it outlines potential issues and risks that investors or potential investors need to be aware of.

While § D covers all 3 Nokia business (Devices & Services, Location & Commerce, and Nokia Siemens Networks) in the blog post below Rafe Blandford of All About Windows Phone focuses on risk factors attendant in the Smartphone Segment of Nokia's Devices & Services, and primarily those associated with the Nokia and Microsoft strategic partnership and its Windows Phone component which forms the 1st pillar of Nokia's new 3 pronged strategy introduced 13 months ago. He concludes the post with this paragraph ...

It is clear that Nokia's goal of creating a third ecosystem with Microsoft, via Windows Phone, remains an enormous challenge. The scale of the task is neatly outlined by the number of risk factors that must be overcome. However, an awareness of these factors is an essential part of plotting a course. This kind of strategic clarity is something that Nokia has been missing in recent years. It also explains why the company's Windows Phone journey is attracting so much interest and optimism from within the industry. The challenge for Nokia now is to execute on its vision.

>> Nokia Files 2011 annual report as 20-F

Rafe Blandford
All About Windows Phone
March 9th 2012

allaboutwindowsphone.com

Nokia filed its annual 20-F form with the US Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday. This is a requirement under US law for companies that have shares traded on a US exchange and is a standardised version of a company's annual report. The purpose of the 20-F is to ensure that investors can can evaluate foreign companies alongside US based companies in a fair and standardised manner.

The 20-F provides a breakdown of 2011's overall financial results, information on the structure of the company, and an outline of company operations. Almost all of this information is already available in previously published Nokia quarterly reports and related financial documents, but the standardised language of the 20-F can offer greater clarity.

Section 3D of the 20-F generally attracts the most interest from industry commentators; it asks companies to provide an assessment of the risk factors it faces. Compared to most company statements, this section can be very forthright about what might go wrong, but it is important to note that these are what can happen, not what is likely to happen (i.e. worst case scenarios). Nonetheless, they can provide valuable insight into what a company perceives to be its major challenges. A well written and comprehensive section 3D will reassure investors because awareness of potential issues is regarded as being a sign of good management.

Nokia's 2011 20-F risk factors section open with the following comment about its smartphone business:

Our success in the smartphone market depends on our ability to introduce and bring to market quantities of attractive, competitively priced Nokia products with Windows Phone that are positively differentiated from our competitors' products, both outside and within the Windows Phone ecosystem, and receive broad market acceptance.

The components of this are broken into greater detail:

The Windows Phone platform is a more recent addition to the market focused on high-end smartphones. While adoption is increasing and consumer awareness growing, it is still much less widely used than the Android and iOS platforms. As with any new platform, we may not succeed in developing it into a sufficiently attractive and competitive smartphone platform.

The Windows Phone ecosystem may not attract developers who will contribute content and applications, thus making our Nokia products with Windows Phone less appealing to consumers.

The Microsoft Windows Phone platform may not support the hardware configurations required to succeed in becoming a sufficiently price competitive platform and may limit our ability to develop a price competitive smartphone portfolio of products.

We may not be able to introduce a compelling portfolio of Nokia products with Windows Phone that include new hardware and design innovations. Additionally, we may not be able to introduce functionalities such as location-based services and entertainment or otherwise customize our Nokia products with Windows Phone in order to positively differentiate our products from competitors' products, both outside and within the Windows Phone ecosystem.

We may face delays in bringing our Nokia products with Windows Phone to various markets due to, for instance, manufacturing difficulties, delays in software and/or hardware development or product or sales package customization to accommodate various markets or operator requests.

We may face issues in selecting, engaging or securing support from leading operators and retailers for the initial launches and sales ramp-up of our Nokia products with Windows Phone due to, for instance, inadequate sales incentives, training of sales personnel, marketing support and experience in generating interest for a new and relatively unfamiliar Windows Phone platform in an otherwise highly competitive market. Delayed or non-optimal initial launches and sales ramp-up could result in diminished support from leading operators and retailers and low consumer interest for subsequent launches of our Nokia products with Windows Phone and may also adversely affect our Nokia brand generally and sales of our other Nokia mobile products.

Consumers may not prefer the Windows Phone user experience, interface or software functionality.

We may not succeed in creating a high level of consumer interest for our Nokia products with Windows Phone, in converting interest for our Nokia products with Windows Phone to purchase decisions or in making the Nokia brand more desirable than brands of our competitors in smartphones.

Microsoft may not be able to provide the software innovations and features we rely on for the Windows Phone operating system in a timely manner, if at all.

Our competitors may provide incentives to operators, retailers or developers that may make it unattractive for them to support Nokia products with Windows Phone, or our competitors may use various technical and commercial means to make it unattractive for consumers that currently use another product to purchase Nokia products with Windows Phone.

Our ongoing transition to the Windows Phone platform may prove to be too long to compete effectively in the smartphone market longer-term given the ongoing developments of other competing smartphone platforms.

Our strategy for Nokia products with Windows Phone may erode our brand identity in markets where we are traditionally strong and may not enhance our brand identity in markets where we are weak. For example, our association with the Microsoft brand may not accelerate our access to a broader market in the United States.

In choosing to adopt Windows Phone as our primary smartphone platform, we may forgo more competitive alternatives achieving greater and faster acceptance in the smartphone market. If the benefits of the Microsoft partnership do not materialize as expected, more competitive alternatives may not be available to us in a timely manner, or at all.

We manufacture mobile devices, but currently no other adjacent products, such as tablets, computers and other connected devices. As a result, Nokia products with Windows Phone may be a less compelling choice for consumers who wish to purchase multiple mobile products from the same manufacturer or with the same or compatible operating system in order to facilitate a smooth interaction among mobile products and electronic products of different types and screen sizes, such as mobile devices, tablets, computers and televisions.

The report also mentions a number of other potential risks. The importance of the ecosystem factor is underlined by its entry as a separate item:

We may not be able to make Nokia products with Windows Phone a competitive choice for consumers unless, together with Microsoft, we successfully encourage and support a competitive and profitable global ecosystem for Windows Phone smartphones that achieves sufficient scale, value and attractiveness to all market participants.

The potential issues of maintaining and extracting the economic value of Symbian are also highlighted:

We may experience further difficulties in having a competitive offering of Symbian devices and maintaining the economic viability of the Symbian smartphone platform during the transition to Windows Phone as our primary smartphone platform.

As is the threat to Nokia's feature phone business from Android:

We may not be able to produce attractive and competitive feature phones, including devices with more smartphone-like features, in a timely and cost efficient manner with differentiated hardware, software, localized services and applications.

And the increasing competition and price pressure on Nokia's digital map / location data business:

We face intense competition in mobile products and in the digital map data and related location-based content and services markets. ... Our strategy for our Location & Commerce business may not succeed if we are unable to maintain current sources of revenue, provide support for our Devices & Services business and create new sources of revenue from our location-based services and commerce assets.

There are also entries much the same as previous years, about issues relating to the need to maintain product innovation and research and development, the need to defend intellectual property, retain skilled staff, maintain the loyalty of customers, reliance on key supply chain partners, managing the manufacturing process, potential cyber security issues, potential quality issues (and the arising impact on brand), the volatility of currency fluctuations, potential regulatory or political changes, changes in technical standard, changes in tax environments, and the impact of litigation and other legal issues.

What is perhaps most notable about Nokia's 2011 20-F is the additional detail on the risk factors facing its smartphone business. By contrast, Nokia's 2009 20-F essentially had just a single direct entry relating to high end devices, one that was rather generic:

We need to have a competitive portfolio of high quality products and services and their combinations that are preferred, purchased and used by our current and potential customers and consumers. If we fail to achieve or maintain a competitive portfolio, our business, sales and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

The 2010 20-F did improve on this, but the Microsoft-Nokia partnership had only just been announced, so potential issues specific to Nokia's use of Windows Phone were somewhat lacking.

It is clear that Nokia's goal of creating a third ecosystem with Microsoft, via Windows Phone, remains an enormous challenge. The scale of the task is neatly outlined by the number of risk factors that must be overcome. However, an awareness of these factors is an essential part of plotting a course. This kind of strategic clarity is something that Nokia has been missing in recent years. It also explains why the company's Windows Phone journey is attracting so much interest and optimism from within the industry. The challenge for Nokia now is to execute on its vision. ###

- Eric -

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To: Eric L who wrote (6989)3/10/2012 11:29:37 AM
From: rich evans
2 Recommendations   of 9176
 
I think the major problem is that all the apple laptops and ipads have to buy iphones to be in synch. Hopefully, HP and Dell and the others will adopt windows 8 which will help with the Windows phone in the same way and allow Nokia to have an enviroment in which to prosper.

Rich

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From: waitwatchwander3/11/2012 1:53:23 AM
2 Recommendations   of 9176
 
CDMA Windows Phone heading to China.

wmpoweruser.com

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