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To: Raymond Duray who wrote (65119)9/21/2011 8:46:38 PM
From: Snowshoe
   of 74259
 
Ray, a new non-conspiracy theory...

Were Twin Towers felled by chemical blasts? (Update)
physorg.com

A mix of sprinkling system water and melted aluminium from aircraft hulls likely triggered the explosions that felled New York's Twin Towers on September 11, 2001, a materials expert has told a technology conference.

"If my theory is correct, tonnes of aluminium ran down through the towers, where the smelt came into contact with a few hundred litres of water," Christian Simensen, a scientist at SINTEF, an independent technology research institute based in Norway, said in a statement released Wednesday."From other disasters and experiments carried out by the aluminium industry, we know that reactions of this sort lead to violent explosions."

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To: Snowshoe who wrote (74227)9/23/2011 7:54:07 PM
From: Ilaine
   of 74259
 
Aluminum oxide plus free elemental iron plus heat = thermite. The actual metals themselves burn at a very high temperature that will turn any metal it touches into slag.

Needs a lot of heat to start the reaction itself.

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To: Ilaine who wrote (74228)9/25/2011 3:46:24 AM
From: Snowshoe
   of 74259
 
Thermite is powerful stuff and makes an elegant weapon. The US commandos used it to disable the big German guns at Point du Hoc on D-Day. Here's a short video clip of it burning a hole thru a steel plate...

Thermite Grenade - ALS Technologies, Inc.
youtube.com

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To: Snowshoe who wrote (74229)9/25/2011 5:32:07 PM
From: The Pre Beakerite
   of 74259
 
"Controlled demolition of the banking system, floor by floor"

that, and nanosecond trading and the looting thereof.

rt.com

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From: Snowshoe12/16/2011 4:36:17 AM
   of 74259
 
Anonymous donors pay off Kmart layaway accounts
news.yahoo.com

At Kmart stores across the country, Santa seems to be getting some help: Anonymous donors are paying off strangers' layaway accounts, buying the Christmas gifts other families couldn't afford, especially toys and children's clothes set aside by impoverished parents.

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From: Snowshoe12/16/2011 7:52:49 PM
   of 74259
 
Rebellion in China? ...

China's Wealth Disparity Erupts in Wukan Protests
businessweek.com

Chinese Police With Shotguns Man Checkpoints Near Scene of Land Protests
bloomberg.com

Chinese Authorities Lose Control as Village Revolts (Video)
youtube.com

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To: Snowshoe who wrote (74232)12/19/2011 4:27:17 PM
From: Snowshoe
1 Recommendation   of 74259
 
Analysis...

After Wukan
By Jacqueline N. Deal
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute
huffingtonpost.com

The ongoing standoff between Chinese police and the defiant residents of Wukan, a 20,000-person village about 200 kilometers northeast of Hong Kong, is nothing short of extraordinary. Reports of the arrival of a "China Spring" are premature, but the comparison is closer than anyone would have predicted before last week. Long after authorities from Beijing re-establish control, Wukan's achievement will affect China's internal security policy, succession dynamics in the run-up to the 2012 leadership handover, and even China's foreign policy.

*****

Reporters from Xinhua, the official Chinese news agency, have now entered the village. While Wukan residents with access to the Chinese microblogging website Weibo were able to communicate with the outside world through last Thursday, a complete blackout has been implemented in advance of Xinhua's coverage, paving the way for an authorized storyline to emerge. Watch for the central party to make gestures to appease the protesters, imprisoning the most egregiously corrupt local officials and providing some compensation for seized land. This will succeed in quieting down Wukan, but history is likely to remember the impact of what happened there on Chinese domestic security practices, jockeying for leadership positions, and even foreign affairs.

*****

These issues are at the forefront of internal party debates on future economic and social policy in the run-up to next year's leadership transition. A rivalry between spokesmen for different approaches has been much reported. The populist, Mao-invoking leader of Chongqing, Bo Xilai, who launched a very public anti-corruption campaign, is said to be vying with Wang Yang, the leader of Guangdong province where Wukan is located, for a seat on the Politburo standing committee.

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From: Snowshoe12/19/2011 6:44:45 PM
   of 74259
 
Hu Jintao's legacy of social control...

Insight: In China, security drive sows own seeds of unrest
uk.reuters.com

(Reuters) - The rebel village of Wukan waits surrounded by what will be one of Chinese President Hu Jintao's most far-reaching yet contested legacies: a vast build-up of the domestic security apparatus that critics say feeds the discontent it was designed to defuse.

*****

"China has always been a heavily controlled place, but what's new is the scale of it, the way in which the government has pushed this as an alternative to the emergence of a real civil society," said Bakken, at the University of Hong Kong.

China's projected budget in 2011 for domestic "public security" - a gauge of spending on "security preservation" - outstripped the defense budget for the first time.

The 13.8 percent jump in China's planned budget for police, state security, armed civil militia, courts and jails brought planned spending on law and order items by the central and local governments to 624 billion yuan ($98 billion) - more than twice the GDP of Uruguay.

China's Ministry of Finance said last month that the growing budget for public security was normal and included items other than "security preservation," Xinhua reported.

But Xie, the Shanghai scholar, said the ministry's own definitions and data showed the "public security" budget goes overwhelmingly to anti-riot forces, police and other law-and-order agencies.

"Denying that stability preservation is a large and growing outlay for the government simply isn't true," said Xie.

The spending jump has paid for more police, surveillance cameras, and anti-riot forces brandishing advanced equipment. Over 104 billion yuan of the public security budget went to the People's Armed Police, the domestic militia, Caijing magazine, a Chinese publication, reported last month.

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From: Snowshoe12/19/2011 6:49:00 PM
   of 74259
 
China's internal spy system rivals the East German Stasi...

After Wukan
huffingtonpost.com

The consequences: Those responsible for maintaining social stability in China will now have to invest even more in local informants to stay abreast of nascent unrest.Already, estimates based on leaks from provincial security bureaus put the number of domestic spies in China at about 39 million, or three percent of the population. (By comparison, in East Germany under the Stasi, informants made up 2.5 percent of the population.) The Wukan precedent is also likely to inspire efforts to make sure that a town cannot survive for long without access to external supplies. Food, water, and medicine stocks in localities could now be regulated.

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To: Snowshoe who wrote (74233)12/20/2011 10:56:00 PM
From: Snowshoe
   of 74259
 
Wukan...

China rebel village, government edge towards compromise
news.yahoo.com

WUKAN, China (Reuters) - Chinese villagers who have protested for days over seized land and a suspicious death postponed a march on a government office on Wednesday, while top provincial officials blamed the conflict on pent-up social ills and laid out a compromise offer.

In a sign that the confrontation that has simmered for more than a week in Wukan, in the southern province of Guangdong, may be easing, a village organizer said the march would be put off until at least Thursday, when residents would decide whether the government had offered enough concessions.

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