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To: Stock Farmer who wrote (86796)10/13/2009 5:38:43 PM
From: DanD
   of 122626
 
Qualcomm's business is complex. It's also made difficult because it makes Intellectual Property as one of its primary products, which is very very hard to value.

And probably why so many of us around here did well in Q especially in the early years are engineering bent, but also why we have stuck around and not profited as much from price swings as good traders, like MarginMike, who has a real knack for buying/bolting at the right times.

Dan D.

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To: engineer who wrote (86795)10/13/2009 6:03:26 PM
From: ggamer
   of 122626
 
Do they need any type of license from QCOM?

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To: DanD who wrote (86748)10/13/2009 8:51:42 PM
From: Maurice Winn
3 Recommendations   of 122626
 
OT... Dan, you whining about Ron whining about Mindy whining about Koreans, Japanese and Euros whining about QCOM royalties and fining QCOM umpty $millions/$billions ... this is ridiculous. We could get a chain letter of whinings...

<Plus whining about someone else's whining just makes you look like a big girl. > ... not to mention sexist.

Would everyone please stop lightening up and get serious: <
You ALL need to lighten up
>

Meanwhile, I confess to buying a cheap Nokia GSM phone to use the 2 degrees mobile phone network in New Zealand. Heresy! Vodafone and Telecom have charged extorquerationate prices always. GSM continues to hold some ground against the CDMA onslaught.

Mqurice

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To: Art Bechhoefer who wrote (86792)10/13/2009 9:51:59 PM
From: DaYooper
1 Recommendation   of 122626
 
Thanks Art. I was not doubting your thoughts on book value but good of you to further clarify them. Actually I was thinking back to years ago a fellow with the moniker CFO provided some pretty nice earnings projections to the thread. These projections provided a basis for where the price should be and might go. With all the many discussions that take place here scarcely ever is there a mention anymore of how much Q might earn this year or next. Just seems a little strange. Rory

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From: Jon Koplik10/13/2009 10:45:41 PM
1 Recommendation   of 122626
 
NYT -- BlackBerry Aims to Suit Every User ............................................................

October 14, 2009

BlackBerry Aims to Suit Every User

By SAUL HANSELL and IAN AUSTEN

The Storm was supposed to be the smartphone that would keep Verizon Wireless customers from deserting to Apple’s iPhone, which runs on AT&T’s network.

Research In Motion, the company that created the BlackBerry phones that business users find so addictive, gave Verizon exclusive rights to sell its first touch-screen phone in order to reach the vast consumer market.

But the Storm failed to live up to its name. About a million devices were sold, so it was not a flop. But many customers and some reviewers found it buggy and hard to use.

Meanwhile, the iPhone’s allure grew with new versions and a rapidly growing catalog of applications.

This week, Verizon and R.I.M. are trying again with a Storm do-over, the Storm 2. Among its many improvements, the new phone gives the user the sensation of pushing a physical button when pressing a number on the glass touch screen.

Lowell C. McAdam, the chief executive of Verizon Wireless, has been carrying the revamped device for a few weeks, looking for any evidence that this time it will catch on. Mr. McAdam said that while he was recently visiting the Verizon store in New York’s SoHo district, he started talking to a couple of students from New York University who were shopping for cellphones.

“I let them play with the second-generation Storm device,” he said. “They came back and said ‘Oh, my gosh.’ They were very excited. This is what they hoped the original Storm should be.”

If enough people share that opinion, R.I.M. could finally have the hit with consumers it has long sought. The Canadian company remains the top seller of smartphones in North America (and second to Nokia worldwide). But Apple is catching up quickly, and a huge crop of new smartphones is heading to stores based on new operating systems from Microsoft and Google. Even Verizon is hedging its smartphone bets with a major deal to develop handsets based on Google’s Android operating system.

R.I.M. has been slow to develop touch-screen technology, and its BlackBerrys are sluggish at browsing the Internet, industry analysts say. And developers have written only about 2,000 applications to run on BlackBerrys, compared with 85,000 for the iPhone and 10,000 for Android phones.

Investors are increasingly worried that R.I.M. cannot keep up with the pace of innovation. R.I.M.’s shares plunged 17 percent in one day last month after the company reported slightly less revenue than analysts expected for the quarter that ended in August.

Analysts were also alarmed because the company said the average price it expected to get from phones sold to wireless carriers would fall to $320, from $350.

“Times are getting tougher for R.I.M. as they move more into the consumer space,” said Carolina Milanesi, an analyst for the Gartner Group. “There is a lot more competition, and consumers don’t care much about the security and other things they sell to enterprises.”

Jim Balsillie, R.I.M.’s co-chief executive, said in a recent interview that investors were misreading the most recent financial results. Prices are falling largely because the company is moving out its inventory of old models in preparation for the new versions of the Storm and the Bold, its top-of-the line, keyboard-based phone.

Moreover, since R.I.M.’s component costs are falling, profit margins are holding steady. “I have never felt more enthusiastic about our business,” he said.

Despite its consumer push, much of R.I.M.’s effort is still tilted to pleasing business customers. Mr. Balsillie said the company planned to shake up the market in November when it will open its private communication network, which will allow BlackBerry users to receive their e-mail and a constant flow of social network updates and entertainment content from other sources.

“The way people love the BlackBerry, e-mail is the way they will love doing a lot more with it,” Mr. Balsillie said.

R.I.M. has been written off many times before. Skeptics said that its first gadgets, which were little more than glorified pagers with keyboards, could not survive in a world of cellphones. Instead of failing, R.I.M. was the fastest-growing company in the world from 2006 through 2008, according to calculations by Fortune magazine.

R.I.M. was not hard hit by the recession, which has forced some of the big companies that have been the heart of its market to lay off workers. And R.I.M. was helped because BlackBerrys have started to become a family phone, too.

The company has also cut the manufacturing cost of BlackBerrys by using variations on its existing designs that have allowed retailers to sell the devices at prices matching much simpler phones. For example, the BlackBerry Curve, R.I.M.’s most popular phone, is offered at Wal-Mart for about $50 with a contract. About 80 percent of R.I.M.’s sales this year have been to consumers, not to employers.

Mike Lazaridis, R.I.M’s other co-chief executive, says that the low cost of BlackBerrys allows cellular carriers to make more profit from the BlackBerrys than from other touch-screen handsets.

“We help carriers be profitable,” he said. “We gave them a way to get into the data business. Now we are giving them a way to manage their costs when they are worried that all they have to sell is highly subsidized smartphones.”

Mr. Lazaridis said that R.I.M. was about to release version 5.0 of its BlackBerry software, which promises to be easier to use, with a better Internet browser and longer battery life.

Applications remain a weak point. Developers say it is harder to write programs for the BlackBerry, especially ones with spiffy graphics and multimedia features. “When you create an application for R.I.M., you have to put in 30 to 40 percent more effort to make it look like what it would look like on the Android or the iPhone,” said Walter Doyle, the chief executive of uLocate Communications, which makes applications to locate businesses on maps.

“Yes, it is a little more difficult to develop on R.I.M.,” Mr. Lazaridis said. The company is working on new tools that will speed the work of applications programmers. But to serve the needs of its big corporate clients, he said, applications will still have to comply with sometimes cumbersome security procedures.

“It’s not a free-for-all,” he said.

That security is a crucial selling point for many customers, including President Obama, probably the best-known BlackBerry user. Mr. Lazaridis says R.I.M.’s precautions protect everyone.

“You’re starting to do banking on your handset,” he said. “Which would you rather use: something that can be hacked in five minutes or something the F.B.I. uses?”


Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company.

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To: A.J. Mullen who wrote (86777)10/13/2009 11:02:55 PM
From: Maurice Winn
1 Recommendation   of 122626
 
Mirasol would be ideal for outdoor FLO tv, but not if the colours are washed out and weak as shown so far [or whatever the technical jargon is for poor picture quality]. Without Mirasol the picture quality will be bad because of ambient light washing out the image as happens now with screens in daylight.

Mirasol for cyberphone devices is fine even with washed out colours because mostly it's data being viewed rather than pictures of things. Being able to see the screen in daylight is the main issue for cyberphones.

As you wrote, Mirasol isn't going to be on FLO any time soon.

Mqurice

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From: sag10/14/2009 6:08:22 AM
2 Recommendations   of 122626
 
Qualcomm's Path-breaking Initiative


By Zacks Equity Research
On 8:39 am EDT, Tuesday October 13, 2009

Future sustainable growth of Qualcomm Inc (NasdaqGS: QCOM - News) is all set to come from its state-of-the-art next-generation Snapdragon technology platform. A major initiative of Qualcomm is the convergence of mobile computing with its Snapdragon solutions. These chipsets have been designed for pocket-sized portable computing devices.
This platform enables phone manufacturers to develop high-speed and more power efficient smart-phones and smart-books. We believe diversification into the mobile computing market was necessary for Qualcomm due to lukewarm growth of the company’s ordinary mobile phone chipset market. Massive growth of smart-phones may make up for these losses.

As of now, over 15 mobile device manufacturers are developing more than 30 Snapdragon-based products. Several leading software developers have started writing applications for mobile operating system, multimedia player, social networking, and productivity development tools based on the Snapdragon platform.

Acer Inc, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., and LG Electronics Inc are the notable computer makers that have agreed to use Snapdragon chipsets. As of now several smart-phones based on Microsoft Corp’s (NasdaqGS: MSFT - News) Windows Mobile 6.5 operating system are getting powered by the Snapdragon technology.

This platform offers an innovative combination of mobile processing performance, optimized power consumption, ubiquitous connectivity and powerful multimedia in a single chip. These Windows smart-phones will have in-built FLO TV facility of Qualcomm. Toshiba has already introduced its TG01 smart-phone using the Snapdragon chipset.

From the next quarter, Qualcomm has decided to start selling Snapdragon based chipsets for smart-books. Smart-book is a pocket digital assistant that functions like a mobile phone but resembles a small size notebook with full keyboards. Using these chipsets, the consumers will no longer be required to carry battery chargers together with their laptops.

These powerful chipsets will run the computer 24 hours with just one battery charge while transmitting/receiving data throughout the day. With this, the company will enter into a new territory primarily dominated by Intel Inc (NasdaqGS: INTC - News), Advanced Micro Devices Inc (NYSE: AMD - News) and Texas Instruments Inc (NYSE: TXN - News).

Qualcomm has also decided to enhance the performance of Adobe System Inc’s (NasdaqGS: ADBE - News) Flash Player 10.1 multimedia features for all chipsets based on its Snapdragon platform. Flash Player 10.1 is the first browser-based runtime developed by the Open Screen Project joint venture between Qualcomm and Adobe that provides a consistent runtime and delivers Web browsing of expressive applications, content and HD video.

The Beta version of this product will be released in the fourth quarter 2009. Toshiba will be the first company to release Snapdragon chipset based smart-book with Flash Player 10.1 support.

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From: ggamer10/14/2009 10:21:58 AM
   of 122626
 
The Personal Navigation Device (PNDs): Worldwide Shipments Grow ...
Figure 6. Infineon Hammerhead II Block Diagram Figure 7. Qualcomm Snapdragon Platform Block Diagram Figure 8. Samsung S3C2416 Block Diagram Figure 9. Worldwide GPS-Enabled Mobile Handsets, 2008 to 2013 (Units in Millions) ...
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In technology, companies related to the growth in the data wave like Qualcomm, Cisco and EMC and Apple. Qualcomm is inside every iPhone and every other 3G ...




IDG Ventures, Qualcomm Invest $3M In Apalya
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IDG Ventures and Qualcomm Ventures have invested $3 mn in Hyderabad-based mobile TV company Apalya Technologies. Venture capital firms IDG Ventures and ...

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To: pyslent who wrote (86790)10/14/2009 10:34:38 AM
From: slacker711
   of 122626
 

I havent seen a timetable for the launch, but Acer just announced an Android handset with Snapdragon.

engadget.com

Slacker

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To: sag who wrote (86803)10/14/2009 11:52:14 AM
From: Jim Mullens
   of 122626
 
SAG, re: Zacks – Qualcomm's Path-breaking Initiative”

Thanks, a couple of items caught my eye.

1) : "Future sustainable growth……
. We believe diversification into the mobile computing market was necessary for Qualcomm due to lukewarm growth of the company’s ordinary mobile phone chipset market


IMO, not as imminent as Zacks implies but nonetheless it’s looming some 3 -5 year out there. And, that impacts DCF / PE valuation AND target prices AND $/sh growth.

2) ”This platform (Snapdragon) offers an innovative combination of mobile processing performance, optimized power consumption, ubiquitous connectivity and powerful multimedia in a single chip. These Windows smart-phones will have in-built FLO TV facility of Qualcomm. Toshiba has already introduced its TG01 smart-phone using the Snapdragon chipset.”

+ I seem to recall the Snapdragon platform also enabling MediaFLO---- can anyone confirm that?

+ If so, viewing FLO TV on the larger screen would be a definite plus. But having the capability on the Snapdragon chip is one thing and having the device maker follow thru and include it on the device is another.

Question- how much more difficult and costly is it to include FLO TV capabilities on the device?

3) ” Project joint venture between Qualcomm and Adobe that provides a consistent runtime and delivers Web browsing of expressive applications, content and HD video.

The Beta version of this product will be released in the fourth quarter 2009. Toshiba will be the first company to release Snapdragon chipset based smart-book with Flash Player 10.1 support.”


Question- How significant is this?

TIA- jim

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