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From: Bill Wolf3/3/2012 12:04:28 PM
1 Recommendation   of 122613
 
Samsung Toiling Away On Bezel-less Galaxy B Smartphone?

Chris Velazco
Friday, February 24th, 2012


Judging by the way Samsung is trying to eliminate bezels from their products, you’d think Samsung found that extra rim of material offensive somehow. The consumer electronics titan is already working on ridding your next television from the confines of a bezel, and if a new report South Korea’s Maeil Business Newspaper holds true, one of their next smartphones will be the first to feature an edge-to-edge screen.

Aside from a small area along the top of the device that houses a speaker and a front-facing camera, the screen on the Galaxy B is reported to cover all of the device’s face. If the bezel is indeed non-existent as the report claims, Samsung may be forced to ditch the familiar rounded-corner design they’ve become so fond of.

Creating a device that’s all screen is enough of a technical challenge, so I doubt that they would go to the trouble of developing a display with rounded corners just so their design language isn’t compromised.

Aside from word of that impressive screen, the MBN’s sources couldn’t deliver any additional specifications. As SlashGear points out though, it’s possible that the Galaxy B will sport one of Samsung’s new quad-core Exynos processors, which would probably propel this thing into the flagship zone.

So could the Galaxy B ultimately become the oft-rumored Galaxy S III? It’s certainly possible, but for now we’ll have to wait and see — MBN’s sources point to a tentative release date in either Q2 or Q3 of this year.

techcrunch.com

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From: BoonDoggler3/3/2012 12:23:24 PM
3 Recommendations   of 122613
 

Vortex radio waves could boost wireless capacity “infinitely”
[Edit: Offered as potential fodder for the RF guys]

After four years of incredulity and not-so-gentle mocking, Bo Thide of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and a team in Italy have finally proven that it’s possible to simultaneously transmit multiple radio channels over exactly the same wireless frequency. In theory, according to Thide, we could potentially transmit an “infinite number” of TV, radio, WiFi, and cellular channels at the same time over the same frequency, blasting apart our highly congested wireless spectrum.

Thide’s approach is rather simple. Basically, electromagnetic waves can have both spin angular and orbital angular momentum (OAM). If you picture the Earth-Sun system, spin momentum is the Earth rotating on its axis (producing the day-night cycle), and orbital momentum is the Earth rotating around the sun (producing the seasons). In standard wireless communications — radio, TV, WiFi — we only modulate the spin angular momentum of waves. For years, Thide had theorized that orbital angular momentum could also be added to wireless signals, effectively creating a spiral signal that looks like fusilli pasta; or, in the words of Thide, a “radio vortex.”

Now, in an experiment in Venice, Thide and his Italian colleagues have transmitted two signals at the same time, on the same frequency, over a distance of 442 meters (1450ft). Pictured on the right is the antenna that the team used. No, your eyes don’t deceive you: To create these radio vortices, all you have to do is make a cut in a standard parabolic reflector and twist it slightly. If you imagine a corkscrew of radio signals being continuously transmitted from the outside edge of the antenna, that’s effectively what’s occurring. On the receiving end, there are two “normal” TV antennae (Yagi-Uda) set apart by the same angle as the break in the transmitter. These antennae “decode” the vortex, and voila: Two radio signals transmitted over the same frequency.


It is hard to put into words just how significant Thide’s discovery could be. If the vortex preserves other aspects of wireless communications, such as multiplexing, then in the short term we could be looking at a wireless spectrum that can carry 10 or 20 times as much data. In the long term, as our understanding of orbital angular momentum grows, our wireless spectrum could effectively be infinite. To be honest, this is such a huge twist for wireless communications that the full repercussions are not yet known.

With radio and TV, and now cellular networks, wireless spectrum is one of humanity’s most valued resources. It is because airwaves are so clogged that companies like Verizon or Vodafone pay billions of dollars for just a few megahertz. If Thide’s discovery pans out, not only would wireless spectrum lose most of its value, but the trouble and strife surrounding LightSquared, international roaming, LTE rollout, white space wireless, and digital TV simply cease to be.

extremetech.com

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To: slacker711 who wrote (110108)3/3/2012 12:32:01 PM
From: Jim Mullens
   of 122613
 
Slacker, re: QCOM’s Lock on LTE…………………….........................................

I dont know of a handset that uses a Qualcomm MDM9x00 (LTE chipset) with somebody else's application processor.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Interesting development!!

However, are not Q’s LTE MDMs used in netbooks / tablets paired with other mfgs APs?

I recall reading that the LTE iPhone was held-up awaiting a smaller LTE modem, and I believe the MDM 9200 /9600 are 45nm… too large for the iPhone? Could size have been the constraint for other handset mfgs?

With the great number of LTE bands requiring support, could that be the reason Q delayed integrating LTE with the AP until 28nm?

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From: BoonDoggler3/3/2012 6:09:50 PM
3 Recommendations   of 122613
 
Here's a new cellular provider, Ting, with some mobile phone plans that are getting more like it. Decent rates, and if you don't use as much as planned for the month, you kick into the lower plan rates, if you use more you kick up to a higher plan rates, just for that month, with no punitive overage rates. Multiple devices on one plan. No contract. No cancellations fees.
What's not to like? It uses Sprint, limited devices available, all without subsidies, it looks like.
The company is owned by TwoCows, a Canadian internet company which also has a domain company, Hover, whom I've personally worked with and really like. I'm pulling for them - we need better plans out there.

Ting

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To: Jim Mullens who wrote (110112)3/3/2012 6:19:47 PM
From: slacker711
   of 122613
 
However, are not Q’s LTE MDMs used in netbooks / tablets paired with other mfgs APs?


It is tough to find the exact modem/AP in many tablets, but for those that I can find, it is an either/or situation. If the tablet has a Qualcomm LTE chip, then they also have a Qualcomm AP.


I recall reading that the LTE iPhone was held-up awaiting a smaller LTE modem, and I believe the MDM 9200 /9600 are 45nm… too large for the iPhone? Could size have been the constraint for other handset mfgs?


I dont think it was size that kept LTE out of the iPhone but battery life and the size of the market.

I doubt size has been much of a factor at all for the MDM9x00. The screen sizes on most of these handsets means that chip size is rarely a limiting factor.


Slacker

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To: BoonDoggler who wrote (110113)3/3/2012 6:34:22 PM
From: slacker711
1 Recommendation   of 122613
 


Those plans are awesome.

Slacker

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To: BoonDoggler who wrote (110113)3/3/2012 7:58:19 PM
From: engineer
   of 122613
 

if it uses Sprint, why limited devices? Is it Clearwire only? Or PCS 3G only?

Not sure from this article. Seems you can buy any Sprint phone from Ebay or elsewhere and activate it, since htere is no subsidy...


but it is about time someone came up with a plan that was better. We are fast approaching a major change in the percentage of wireless versus wired, if it has not already flipped past 50%. If so, we have alot of lifeline programs for wired, but as of yet, no real lifeline for wireless.

We do have government plans ot buy wireles phones for people, but those plans are not well mandated or run.

When do we think the greed factor from te major carriers will push the FCC and the local PUCs to start regulating the carriers?

Throttling plans when they are unlimited, ever changing rate stepping plans which are sold to save money, only to make you pay more for any increase you take. Most of those payments done by surprised people who all the sudden try to use a new application.

As we move towards a more braodband world, will we move towards a more regulated and controlled broadband?

Everyone thought this talk was crazy in the 30's and 40's for wired phones, but back them it was close to this mess we have now.

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From: engineer3/3/2012 8:06:05 PM
2 Recommendations   of 122613
 
Open post to the handset manufacterers and carriers....

If you wanted to sell more phones, create an app that I can download which clones my phone from my old one. PCs have them. Tablets and smartphones do not.

I just upgraded from a Driod Bionic to a Razor MAXX. the process was an absolute mess.

all those weeks of settings, finding menus, passwords, links, apps downlaoding, contacts setup, etc were totally thrown out and I had to take (18 hours) quite a while to get it all right.

In the process, I found that the email settings on the last phone do not equal the settings on the new phone. what I typed in before does nto match what I type in now. this was 3 hours with level 3 support at VZ.

contacts that were entered prior were not ported because the app that started it was gone, and not on teh new phone, so only half my contacts came over. another 1.5 hours debugging this.

Sim card did not setup, phone number did not come up, 4GLTE was not setup right.

This was the worst change I have made except when i changed form Blackberry to Bionic last time. that was more like 3 weeks and 10 calls to tech suport.

IF...there was a simple clone program which wrote to my SD card, then porting the phone from model to model would be so simple. Write it as an APP that I can download.

And perhaps if you care, then also setup a REAL profile for business. You do not do this and it shows.

this includes all the android models, all the major carriers.

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To: engineer who wrote (110116)3/3/2012 9:08:29 PM
From: BoonDoggler
1 Recommendation   of 122613
 
Seems you can buy any Sprint phone from Ebay or elsewhere and activate it, since htere is no subsidy...

From Ting's FAQ:

I already have a mobile phone or data device with another carrier (Verizon, Sprint, etc…), can I bring my own device to use on Ting?
In order to become a Ting customer, you must purchase a device from Ting. You may also transfer your existing phone number to Ting from your current provider and use it with your new Ting device.


Damn. But they do have 4G and 3G phones. Which they call 'very small computers' and note '(Most of these can also make phone calls.)'. These guys get it.

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To: BoonDoggler who wrote (110118)3/4/2012 3:26:38 AM
From: engineer
   of 122613
 
yea, sure, No subsidy? why do they need to control the phones?

Strange model

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