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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (40743)3/27/2012 7:04:30 PM
From: LindyBill
1 Recommendation   of 44145
 
Cheap energy from a box next to your house? He probably has a carburetor for your car that gets 200 miles to the gallon.

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (40743)3/27/2012 11:02:42 PM
From: axial
   of 44145
 
Hi Frank - A strange speech. No distinction is made between "possibly true" and "probably false". Both get equal time.

Jim

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To: axial who wrote (40745)3/28/2012 12:11:10 AM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 44145
 
Hi Jim,

The author isn't the first to have made a trade out of uncertainty ;)

FAC

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From: Frank A. Coluccio3/28/2012 12:32:01 AM
   of 44145
 
[UnLEEDed] Army Abandons LEED Certification
Chris Cheatham | Sustainable Cities | 03-27-12

We have entered a new era of green building policy.  The Army is abandoning LEED certification.

On February 28, 2012, I reported, via a BuildingGreen article, that the Army had reiterated its commitment to LEED certification despite DoD re-authorization legislation that banned LEED Gold and Platinum certification. Less than one month later, the Army has announced it is abandoning LEED certification. The Army is launching its own building code modeled off of ASHRAE 189.1 in lieu of pursuing LEED certification.

Cont.: sustainablecitiescollective.com

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From: LindyBill3/28/2012 6:58:14 AM
   of 44145
 
"Too Big To Defend
March 28, 2012: Over the last decade the U.S. Department of Defense has become aware of elaborate Chinese plans to use Internet based attacks to support more conventional military operations. This awareness initially elicited incredulity, followed by fear which led to a more detailed investigation of the situation. Now there are attempts to deal with the problem.

The problem is huge, and more dangerous that anyone initially believed. The basic problem is that the U.S. military embraced the Internet early and has by now become one of the heaviest users on the planet. With millions of users, over a million devices connected to the Internet and over 10,000 separate networks, the Department of Defense is also one of the most difficult Internet targets to defend. With so much exposure, and not enough money to install (and manage) adequate security, the Department of Defense has been searching for the most efficient strategy to deal with expected Chinese attacks.

This has led to studies of what kind of damage the Chinese could do, and how best to cope with it. This sort of thing involves finding out what operations could be shut down (and for how long) and what impact this would have on military operations. The most vulnerable operations involve logistics. This covers everything from handling requests for spare parts, ammo and fuel as well as requests for specialized maintenance services and control of aircraft and ships moving supplies.

Having fallback plans (or "Plan B") ready beforehand is much more effective than scrambling to cope right after your Internet systems have been interrupted or corrupted. In effect, the Department of Defense is getting into wargaming possible Internet based attacks, including working out what you do if the defenses, such as they are, don't work. This also involves non-military systems used by companies that provide logistics services (goods, transportation and management) for the Department of Defense. At the moment, it appears that the U.S. Department of Defense computer systems are too vast to defend, and that the best strategy is to figure out how to recover from the inevitable damage."

strategypage.com

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To: pltodms who wrote (40731)3/28/2012 3:15:09 PM
From: pltodms
   of 44145
 
This Pinterest Scammer Is Making More Than $1,000 a Day
MAR 28 2012, 10:37 AM ET
Is Silicon Valley's latest hot product the easiest to social network to game? A successful spammer seems to think so.

A 24-year-old Pinterest spammer interviewed by The Daily Dot revealed some fascinating details about the business of making money in the moral gray area of social network spamming. The most pertinent, perhaps, is that the unnamed man is already making $1,000 a day and expects to be making $2,500 a day next week.
The spammer claimed to have spent time spamming both Twitter and Facebook. How does the latest hot network compare to those incumbents? "Pinterest is by FAR the easiest social network to spam right now," he said. "Quite possibly the easiest ever to spam."

The particular scheme he's deployed uses bots to post pictures of products to Pinterest that are available on Amazon. When people clickthrough those links and purchase something, he gets a cut like all affiliate marketers. 

Oh, and of course, this user is unrepentant and realistic: 

"I have no guilt," he told the Daily Dot. "I'm not trying to scam anyone, or upload viruses to their computer or anything like that. I simply show products to the Pinterest community. I realize that I'm spamming the crap out of the site, but its nothing personal, just business.

theatlantic.com


Daily Dot interview:
dailydot.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio3/28/2012 3:27:32 PM
   of 44145
 
Watch Recorded Keynote Speaker Sessions from OFC/NFOEC 2012

Google’s Vice President of Access Networks, Milo Medin, spoke on the current “age of abundance”.
ofcnfoec.org

Greg Papadopoulos, venture partner with New Enterprise Associates and former CTO of Sun Microsystems, spoke on exa-scale computing and what it means for the optics industry.
ofcnfoec.org

Verizon’s Stu Elby gave a keynote address on “Cloud Computing as a Service."
ofcnfoec.org

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From: pltodms3/28/2012 5:14:32 PM
   of 44145
 
A UNIVERSE OF SELF-REPLICATING CODE

George Dyson [3.26.12]

[...]
What's the driver today? You want one word? It's advertising. And, you may think advertising is very trivial, and of no real importance, but I think it's the driver. If you look at what most of these codes are doing, they're trying to get the audience, trying to deliver the audience. The money is flowing as advertising.
And we have never seen that. Or I mean, we have seen numbers like that, in epidemics or chain reactions, and there's no question it's a very interesting phenomenon. But still, it's very hard not to just look at it from our point of view. What does it mean to us? What does it mean to my investments? What does it mean to my ability to have all the music I want on my iPhone? That kind of thing. But there's something else going on. We're seeing a fraction of one percent of it, and there's this other 99.99 percent that people just aren't looking at.

The beginning of this was driven by two problems. The problem of nuclear weapons design, and the problem of code breaking were the two drivers of the dawn of this computational universe. There were others, but those were the main ones.

What's the driver today? You want one word? It's advertising. And, you may think advertising is very trivial, and of no real importance, but I think it's the driver. If you look at what most of these codes are doing, they're trying to get the audience, trying to deliver the audience. The money is flowing as advertising.

And it is interesting that Samuel Butler imagined all this in 1863, and then in his book Erewhon. And then 1901, before he died, he wrote a draft for " Erewhon Revisited." In there, he called out advertising, saying that advertising would be the driving force of these machines evolving and taking over the world. Even then at the close of 19th century England, he saw advertising as the way we would grant power to the machines.
[...]
http://edge.org/conversation/a-universe-of-self-replicating-code

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From: axial3/28/2012 8:30:49 PM
   of 44145
 
Wind map

'These are 1-hour forecasts, downloaded once per hour. So what you're seeing is close to live data.'

hint.fm

Jim

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From: Frank A. Coluccio3/29/2012 3:19:19 PM
1 Recommendation   of 44145
 
Never let a Boeing engineer fix your lawn mower!
by Tornado Woman

Video: eons.com

Hat tip: Ron T.

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