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From: Frank A. Coluccio2/22/2012 10:28:43 AM
2 Recommendations   of 43895
 
Peak Telecoms

From Martin Geddes' Future of Communications blog, January 27, 2012

I threw what I was going to send in this month’s Future of Communications newsletter in the trash. It was good stuff – a powerful essay on why network neutrality can never ever work, and loads of links and comments. I'll save it for another day.

Instead, I had something much more important to say, and didn’t want any clutter in the way of saying it. I want to join the dots on what I’m seeing, and stick my neck out and be provocative. I have reproduced the content of the newsletter here on the blog.

We’re at “Peak Telecoms”.

This is it. Look around you. Whatever you are doing, however you are making money, it isn’t going to get better than this. This industry has hit its maximum share of the economy. We are the digital railroad business at the height of the railroad barons. The only way now is down. We’ll see maybe one or two more mini-booms, a few more troughs, but the long-term trend has just gone into reverse.

What’s going on? Let’s gather the evidence.

Cont.: futureofcomms.com 

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From: LindyBill2/22/2012 6:41:31 PM
1 Recommendation   of 43895
 
Talk about red faces! This lab will never post any "news" again. They ought to get an Italian medal.

Faster than light neutrinos? More like faulty wiring

February 22, 2012 by Jason Major, Universe Today


physorg.com 

Ever since the news came out on September 22 of last year that a team of researchers in Italy had clocked neutrinos traveling faster than the speed of light, the physics world has been resounding with the potential implications of such a discovery — that is, if it were true. The speed of light has been a key component of the standard model of physics for over a century, an Einstein-established limit that particles (even tricky neutrinos) weren’t supposed to be able to break, not even a little.

Now, according to a breaking news article by Edwin Cartlidge on AAAS’ ScienceInsider, the neutrinos may be cleared of any speed violations.

“According to sources familiar with the experiment, the 60 nanoseconds discrepancy appears to come from a bad connection between a fiber optic cable that connects to the GPS receiver used to correct the timing of the neutrinos’ flight and an electronic card in a computer,” Cartlidge reported...

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From: Frank A. Coluccio2/23/2012 2:42:37 AM
   of 43895
 
Communicating Data Beyond the Speed of Light
James Hamilton | Perspectives | Feb. 21, 2012

In the past, I’ve written about the cost of latency and how reducing latency can drive more customer engagement and increase revenue. Two example of this are: 1) The Cost of Latency and 2) Economic Incentives applied to Web Latency. Nowhere is latency reduction more valuable than in high frequency trading applications. Because these trades can be incredibly valuable, the cost of the infrastructure on which they trade is more or less an afterthought. Good people at the major trading firms work hard to minimize costs but, if the cost of infrastructure was to double tomorrow, high frequency trading would continue unabated.

Cont.: perspectives.mvdirona.com 

fac: sorry Bill, no medals being handed out here... only another excellent article from Amazon's James Hamilton...

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From: sm1th2/23/2012 11:11:09 AM
   of 43895
 
Did Bad Memory Chips Down Russia's Mars Probe?

The failure of Russia's ambitious Phobos-Grunt space mission has been shrouded in confusion and mystery-from the first inklings of trouble after its November launch to inconsistent reports of where it fell to Earth in January, and beyond. The release of the official accident investigation results on 3 February served only to further rumors of fundamental hardware and software design flaws, and of blatant violations of safety standards. The report blames the loss of the probe primarily on memory chips that became fatally damaged by cosmic rays. But observers place the blame squarely on the engineers who put Phobos-Grunt together, noting that if these military-grade chips (which were not radiation hardened) had been proposed for a critical component in a space-probe design for the U.S. space program, they probably would not have been approved for use. Worse still for Russia's space agency are reports suggesting that the chips were counterfeits that had been intentionally misrepresented as offering higher performance than they were actually capable of.

From IEEE Spectrum

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To: sm1th who wrote (40553)2/23/2012 12:37:03 PM
From: Win-Lose-Draw
   of 43895
 
Worse still for Russia's space agency are reports suggesting that the chips were counterfeits that had been intentionally misrepresented as offering higher performance than they were actually capable of.


Curious to know how they would have gotten through basic testing.


From the outside looking in, seems like a pretty colossal systemic failure of the entire engineering team.

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From: ftth2/23/2012 3:43:16 PM
1 Recommendation   of 43895
 
How Companies Learn Your Secrets

nytimes.com 

worth a read...

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To: ftth who wrote (40555)2/23/2012 5:38:02 PM
From: deeno
   of 43895
 
really enjoyed this thanks.

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To: ftth who wrote (40555)2/23/2012 8:06:49 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 43895
 
[Analytics] Colbert: Target knows what you’re doing in bed
By David Ferguson | February 23, 2012

rawstory.com 

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To: ftth who wrote (40555)2/23/2012 9:31:46 PM
From: axial
   of 43895
 
Revealing to see how easily these techniques result in success. Given sufficient capital and demographic reach, large populations can be motivated in domains far beyond simple purchasing decisions.

Jim

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From: pltodms2/24/2012 2:43:05 PM
   of 43895
 
We, the Web Kids

FEB 21 2012, 11:36 AM ET 57

Piotr Czerski is a Polish writer and commentator. Here, he lays out the kind of political/literary manifesto that seems to pop up from time to time, usually in Europe. The essay, as translated by Marta Szreder, was posted to Pastebin under a Creative Commons license. I repost it here with the first several paragraphs excised, so that we can hasten to the meat of Czerski's analysis about how the expectations of young people have been conditioned by their experiences of the Internet.

theatlantic.com 

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