SI
SI
discoversearch

 Technology Stocks | The *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


Previous 10 | Next 10 
From: Frank A. Coluccio1/25/2012 8:31:00 PM
2 Recommendations   of 43893
 
Making universities obsolete
Matt Welsh | Jan 23, 2012

Sebastian Thrun recently announced that he was leaving Stanford to found a free, online university called Udacity. This is based on his experiences teaching the famous intro to AI class, for free, to 160,000 students online.

Is this just Education for the Twitter Generation? Or truly a revolution in how we deliver higher education? Will this ultimately render universities obsolete?

I want to ponder the failings of the conventional higher education model for a minute and see where this leads us, and consider whether something like Udacity is really the solution.

Cont.: matt-welsh.blogspot.com 
--

fac: some interesting perspectives, worthy of a read ...

Hat tip: Gordon Cook

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: Frank A. Coluccio1/25/2012 11:40:37 PM
   of 43893
 
PUE Version 2 Improves Green Data Center Measurements
Posted on January 18, 2012 by The Higher Ed CIO

Image Courtesy of Mission Critical Magazine

Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) is the accepted metric for measuring and reporting data center energy performance. But with so much interest in green data centers in recent years there was a need to create greater consistency and clarity in how power usage effectiveness was measured and reported. Readers of this blog may recall earlier stories about the use of PUE, Green IT, and scorecards for Internet data centers and the difficulty in comparing one data center to another.

To address the issues with PUE the Taskforce that gave us the original version of the PUE met again and in May of 2011 released “Recommendations For Measuring and Reporting Overall Data Center Efficiency Version 2 – Measuring PUE for Data Centers” ( Download PUE Version 2) clarifying the metric.

PUE Version 2 does a couple of very important things.

Article continues: blog.thehigheredcio.com 

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: Frank A. Coluccio1/26/2012 1:32:54 AM
   of 43893
 
LightSquared Says GPS Tests Rigged

LightSquared Says GPS Tests Rigged

Rob Powell | Telecom Ramblings | January 19th, 2012

One would have hoped that by now cooler heads would have prevailed, but it looks like the heated rhetoric between LightSquared and the GPS industry is going the distance. Following tests by the Air Force Space Command in which they fared badly, the company says that the whole thing was riggedby [Read more ?]

Cont.: telecomramblings.com 

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)


To: axial who wrote (40433)1/26/2012 5:04:45 AM
From: axial
   of 43893
 
Opposing view: Why 3-D Printing Will Go the Way of Virtual Reality

Extruding, printing, and sintering are not the same as manufacturing.

'
The desire for 3-D printing to take over from traditional manufacturing needs to be recognized for what it is: an ideology. Getting all of our goods from a box in the corner of our home has attractive implications, from mass customization to " the end of consumerism." With stakes like those, who wouldn't want to be a true believer? Hype is inevitably followed by some level of backlash, or at least disinterest, and it would be a shame for 3-D printing to head into a too-deep trough of the Gartner hype cycle. There will be plenty of interesting applications for 3-D printing, but I'll bet the ones that will have the biggest impact will be within traditional factories, where rapid prototyping is already having a huge impact.'

technologyreview.com 

Jim

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)

From: pltodms1/27/2012 11:18:27 AM
   of 43893
 
What's Ahead for Natural Gas?

By Amy Harder

energy and environment reporter, National Journal


What are the challenges and opportunities ahead for natural gas?

The recent revolution involving shale natural gas in the United States has sparked debate on a range of issues: the environmental and safety concerns surrounding hydraulic fracturing--the controversial extraction method that's critical to accessing shale gas; how gas should be used within the country; and whether gas should be exported to countries where prices are high compared to domestic prices, which are at record lows.

Recent developments on these issues underscore the importance of the natural-gas industry. More and more states are enacting laws that require companies to disclose the ingredients and concentrations of the fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. The Energy Department is already approving the first natural-gas exports, and several other applications are pending before it. Meanwhile, legislation in Congress would provide tax incentives for natural-gas-powered trucks, and Environmental Protection Agency clean-air rules are encouraging more utilities to shift from coal-fired power plants to natural gas, which burns cleaner than coal.

How should President Obama and Congress handle these disparate issues in the natural-gas industry? Should Congress enact federal legislation requiring disclosure of fracking fluids? Should the United States export natural gas to capitalize on the shale gas revolution and high prices abroad? What role, if any, should the U.S. government play in regulating natural-gas exports?

energy.nationaljournal.com 

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (1)

From: Frank A. Coluccio1/27/2012 1:49:55 PM
   of 43893
 
Regional Cap-and-Trade Effort Seeks Greater Impact by Cutting Carbon Allowances
By MIREYA NAVARRO | NY Times | Jan 26, 2012

Adjusting to shifts in the economy, states in the cap-and-trade system known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative have slashed the number of allowances that electric power companies can buy to offset their emissions.

The decision, made last week, was intended to shore up the pioneering program as it undergoes its first comprehensive review this year. While the program has been judged a success by most of the participating states, in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, an oversupply of the allowances — in essence, permits to pollute — has limited the program’s impact.

Cont.: nytimes.com 

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read


To: axial who wrote (40434)1/27/2012 4:49:45 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 43893
 
Using Ocean Temperature Differences to Create Renewable Energy

blog.cleantechies.com 

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

From: Frank A. Coluccio1/27/2012 5:13:43 PM
   of 43893
 
Liquidity Centers Are the First Step Toward Industry Utilities: Liquidity centers will eventually become liquidity and utility centers for the equities markets.
Jan 23, 2012
wallstreetandtech.com 
--

Liquidity Centers Are Big Business: Exchanges are the latest participants to jump into the data center colocation game as the appetite for hosted services shows no letdown.
Jan 26, 2012
wallstreetandtech.com 

------

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read

To: pltodms who wrote (40440)1/28/2012 12:52:10 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 43893
 
Everything You Know About Peak Oil Is Wrong We’re not running out of resources. Quite the contrary. And in our abundance lies a paradox
Charles Kenny, New America Foundation

businessweek.com 

<>

In 1971, the Limits to Growth team forecast that the world’s supply would run out 10 years from today. And yet according to renowned oil analyst Daniel Yergin, technology advances and new discoveries have allowed oil reserves worldwide to keep growing. For every barrel of oil produced in the world from 2007 to 2009, 1.6 barrels of new reserves were added. The World Energy Council reports that global proven recoverable reserves of natural gas liquids and crude oil amounted to 1.2 trillion barrels in 2010. That’s enough to last another 38 years at current usage. Add in shale oil, and that’s an additional 4.8 trillion barrels, or a century and a half’s worth of supply at present usage rates. Tar sands, including some huge Canadian deposits, add perhaps 6 trillion barrels more.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read | Read Replies (3)


To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (40444)1/28/2012 5:14:35 PM
From: Win-Lose-Draw
   of 43893
 
In 1971, the Limits to Growth team forecast that the world’s supply would run out 10 years from today.


That's not correct. LtG never claimed or projected that the world would run out of oil.


The furthest the claim goes is that the finite supply of resources such as oil won't be sufficient to enable further rampant growth.

Share Recommend | Keep | Reply | Mark as Last Read
Previous 10 | Next 10 

Copyright © 1995-2014 Knight Sac Media. All rights reserved.Stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes - See Terms of Use.