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 Pastimes | The New Qualcomm - write what you like thread.


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To: Maurice Winn who wrote (9383)4/20/2012 12:41:03 PM
From: waitwatchwander
   of 9454
 
I missed the people marks. Good point. I tend to focus more upon subject matter with most of the same folks just following that around. Tenacious petulance can win wars.

As you've aged, you've yet to temper your ways.

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To: Maurice Winn who wrote (9383)4/23/2012 10:03:32 AM
From: waitwatchwander
   of 9454
 
Mirasol shares a lot of traits with MediaFLO. How it all works out is still up in the air but no matter how it turns out, it won't be because the product wasn't well engineered. Imagineering, marketeering and partner searing may be another matter though.

In his speech at ASU, Dr. Jacobs mentioned Qualcomm is managed like a bunch of startups with no limits on available cash. Restricted cash is a hunger factor which some may believe is a key ingredient to a successful startup. It's certainly been more than a decade since Qualcomm employees had to be concerned with their funding needs.

I fixed my wifi issues. It was an app which accumulated my wifi data usage. Unless one wants to get down and dirty, it's always best to leave good enough alone.

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To: waitwatchwander who wrote (9385)4/23/2012 4:20:02 PM
From: Maurice Winn
2 Recommendations   of 9454
 
Hopefully we do not have a swarm of dilettantes having a fun go at "great ideas". <
In his speech at ASU, Dr. Jacobs mentioned Qualcomm is managed like a bunch of startups with no limits on available cash. Restricted cash is a hunger factor which some may believe is a key ingredient to a successful startup.
> A big load of cash sloshing around never seems to bring out the best in people who didn't earn it.

Mqurice

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From: Bill Wolf4/28/2012 9:31:49 AM
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Oh Henry! Oh Amazon!

By MARK VEVERKA
Amazon.com stock surges, as gross margins jump.

Where is Henry Blodget when you need him? Somebody needs to explain how Amazon.com's share valuation really works. Because, despite wondering about it for more than a decade, I still can't figure it out. First it was eyeballs. Then it was clicks. Then revenue-per-customer, then wallet-share and now gross margins. Price-earnings-ratios be damned.

We need Blodget, the former brokerage analyst, to explain it. After all, he made the audacious call back during the dot.com bubble predicting that the Seattle e-tailer's shares would hit 400. But unfortunately for him, he ran afoul of then-New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who got him banished from the securities industry and sentenced to life as a journalist and blogger. (Blodget is now editor of Business Insider, which he founded.)

But Blodget long ago figured out something about this mysterious stock that defies nearly everything we think we know about investing. Amazon shares (ticker: AMZN) blasted off last week like one of CEO Jeff Bezos's rocket ships, soaring 15.75% Friday, ending the week at $226.85.

To be sure, Amazon also blasted through the Street's earnings estimates for the first quarter, reporting 28 cents a share, compared with the consensus estimate of six cents. The big beat came on the heels of a big whiff last quarter. So inconsistent. So Amazon.

ON TOP OF THE IMPRESSIVE EARNINGS, analysts were euphoric over the 1.2- percentage-point jump in gross margins, to 24%, after quarters of weak gross margins. It was the company's biggest margin gain in about 10 years. As we have stated before, the one thing we understand about Bezos is his resolute belief in heavy spending to sustain growth–even at costs that often squeeze margins and defy historical disciplines. His build-it-and-they-will come philosophy has served the company well, whether constructing warehouses, manufacturing e-readers, or building massive data centers for cloud computing.

Last week, the company credited the heftier margins to faster growth in its online marketplace and cloud-computing operation, Amazon Web Services, or AWS. As a result, a number of brokerages upgraded their recommendations. Goldman Sachs software analyst Heather Bellini raised the shares to a Buy from Neutral, and her 12-month price target to $300 from $182. Nomura Securities' software analyst, Brian Nowak, also has a Buy rating; he boosted his target price to $285 from $200. Bank of America Merrill Lynch software analyst Justin Post changed his rating to Buy and lifted his target to $270 from $235.

The valuations were certainly not based on P/E ratios. The shares are trading at about 90 times 2013 earnings estimates. Compare that to Apple (AAPL) at 11 times 2013 estimates, and Google (GOOG) at 12 times.

For all of the attention paid to media, Kindles and retailing, the most compelling part of the company's growth story could be its cloud business, which has been difficult to measure until recently. Nomura's Nowak values Amazon Web Services at $48 a share, nearly one-sixth of his price target for the parent company. He estimates 2016 (yes, 2016!) AWS revenue at $6.21 billion, times 4.7, which is the enterprise-value-to-sales ratio of Rackspace Hosting (RAX), a leading cloud-services outfit, based in San Antonio.

Talk about the power of the cloud.

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To: Bill Wolf who wrote (9387)4/29/2012 6:40:34 PM
From: waitwatchwander
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---> one thing we understand about Bezos is his resolute belief in heavy spending to sustain growth–even at costs that often squeeze margins and defy historical disciplines.

The above take has quite a familiar sounding. I wonder if Bezos has whispered his "build-it-and-they-will come philosophy"into someones ear ...

Oh Henry! Oh Amazon! Oh PJ !

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To: waitwatchwander who wrote (9388)5/1/2012 1:33:31 AM
From: Maurice Winn
1 Recommendation   of 9454
 
15 years ago, people were moaning about Qualcomm's lack of profits. I looked at the expenses and saw a dirty great pile of R&D costs. It seemed to me that those were simply delayed in their progress to the bottom line and would arrive a few years later along with swarms of companions resulting from the R&D.

But these days, the spending on innovation and all sorts of bright ideas is not so successful. A $billion here and a $billion there and we come up empty-handed all too often.

If Bezos is spending the money on the right things, good for him. It's not as though there is a shortage of things which need doing and inventing. <Bezos is his resolute belief in heavy spending to sustain growth–even at costs that often squeeze margins and defy historical disciplines. > But all the money in the world can be poured down the gurgler chasing wishful thinking - like Solyndra which is now a hazardous waste bankrupt mess as well as a total failure financially.

Mqurice

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From: waitwatchwander5/4/2012 11:14:02 PM
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A Queen's University research team has developed a system to produce life-size, three-dimensional holograms that could radically change the way people communicate on-line.

m.torontosun.com

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To: waitwatchwander who wrote (9390)5/5/2012 8:34:22 PM
From: Maurice Winn
1 Recommendation   of 9454
 
What does this mean? < “Cylindrical is really interesting because it fits the human form factor,” said Vertegaal, who based his PhD studies on video conferencing. > Does he mean the "human shape" or maybe simply "human form"?

There is the expression "Assume a spherical cow". Perhaps he likes "Assume a cylindrical human".

I agree that the human form fits nicely into the right sized cylinder.

That is part of my new airline which will not have seats, but cylinders stacked floor to ceiling for people to lie down in so they can be really comfortable during night time [and other] journeys. Enjoying quiet and no interruptions.

Each cylinder could be its own little safety capsule too, so that if there's a crash landing, and the plane breaks up and catches fire, the individual tubes will break loose and escape the mess or at least be fire proof long enough for the crash fire crowd to extinguish the flames or for the flames to burn all the fuel. If the plane crashes in the sea, they would float to the surface and be a snug, warm and dry life boat with a Globalstar SPOT distress beacon and internet connection. The SPOT/Globalstar would double as an internet connection in normal use.

Each capsule would have its own in-flight water supply which would be useful in the event of life-boat mode. Plus an aluminium coated helium balloon which would inflate and hover above the capsule for ease of location [and in case nearby boats are not in communication with emergency services but do have radar and a look out].

There could be even be an emergency ejection mechanism so the tubes get fired out into the sky with a parachute deployed like the microlight aircraft. Each tube would have its own porthole so if the blinds were up, it would be a great viewing site.

In regular flight, people could take off from Auckland at 8pm have dinner, have a good night's sleep, and wake up in Singapore/Hong Kong/Shanghai/Tokyo ready for the day [or night, depending on where they land, and when].

It would be VERY popular.

The Europe/North America route would be good too as it's one good night's sleep away. Same for North America to East Asia.

With a Zenbu wifi connection to Cyberspace, and convenient finger food, passengers would have a really good flight. People could travel "open hatch" or closed for privacy and quiet. There could be double bunks which would save space and might sell at quite a premium so people could join the mile-high club in comfort, without nosy people intruding. Sick people could lie down in comfort and receive medical treatment. Al Qaeda members could be forced into them and locked up for the rest of the flight.

Fares could be lowered as many more people could fit on the flight, but the airline would make more profit because the seats would be so desirable other airlines would go out of business. Patent pending...


Mqurice

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To: Maurice Winn who wrote (9391)5/11/2012 10:21:52 PM
From: waitwatchwander
   of 9454
 
Here's an interesting use of holographic display. Augmented reality in 3D.

m.classicrockmagazine.com

This came from the person composing Skifta tweets. All their tweets are music related. I have yet to figure out how their plethora of music tweets relates more than in an indirect manner to this DLNA product. Skifta is so much more than just playing one's music anywhere.

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From: DWB5/30/2012 9:52:02 AM
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Mqurice...

Not sure how long it's been since he was taken out for a ritual flogging, but I just saw that Bill Frezza is now commenting for Forbes magazine... Including this piece he wrote last year about the crisis in Greece...

forbes.com

DWB

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