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From: Savant5/22/2017 6:50:13 PM
   of 1171
 

Communicate w/Dolphins using computer AI by 2021

thesun.co.uk

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From: Savant6/12/2017 1:34:34 AM
   of 1171
 
Nanoized Super Water....grows 40% more melons hydroponically


Up to 40% more melons thanks to nanotechnology

* wonder what's causing the wilted and brown edged leaves? The melons sure look good

BUSINESSMAY 18, 2017






Nanolabs, a company specialised in nanotechnology, has been able to increase the production of melons by up to 40% on a farm in Almeria, thanks to the installation of ASAR systems in the irrigation system of the farm.

In 2015, 30,000 kilos were harvested, while in the same period of 2016, this figure increased to 50,000 kilos; a 40% growth.

To achieve this, Nanolabs applies nanotechnology through its ASAR solution, which acts physically on water, emitting a quantum of energy that stimulates hydrogen bonds. As a result, these become more active, which translates into a better transport of nutrients to the crops and a significant improvement in the use of the nutrients present in the substrate.

The increase in production has not been the only benefit of the project; it has also made it possible to improve the quality of the fruit and has reduced both the consumption of water for irrigation and the use of fertilisers and phytosanitary products by 20%.

For Javier Llanes, CEO of Nanolabs, "the dramatic increase in the melon production is just one example of the great benefits that nanotechnology can bring to the agricultural sector. At Nanolabs, we apply technology to promote sustainability and we work on innovative projects with impressive results in both production improvement and savings in water consumption."

https://nano-magazine.com/news/2017/5/18/up-to-40-more-melons-thanks-to-nanotechnology

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From: Savant6/16/2017 7:40:43 PM
   of 1171
 

Work on Y2K prep finally cancelled after 17 yrs....Time to work on Y10K??

bloomberg.com

Those monitors @ link are so way-back-when....time flies

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From: Savant7/20/2017 12:32:21 PM
   of 1171
 

An international team of researchers led by a group at the Australian National University (ANU) is the first to demonstrate ultra-fast transmission of information through an optical nanoantenna that has been imprinted onto an optical waveguide. These results could have significant implications for telecommunication applications, enabling high-speed data transmission through these devices.


spectrum.ieee.org

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From: Savant7/27/2017 12:34:43 PM
   of 1171
 

Internet/censorship/AI/surveillance/Facial Recognition/'social credits'//China now, USA next?

BEIJING--China's already formidable internet censors have demonstrated a new strength--the ability to delete images in one-on-one chats as they are being transmitted, making them disappear before receivers see them. Displays of this new image-filtering capability kicked into high gear last week as Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo lay dying from liver cancer and politically minded Chinese tried to pay tribute to him, according to activists and a new research report. Wu Yangwei, a friend of the long-jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate, said he used popular messaging app WeChat to send friends a photo of a haggard Mr. Liu embracing his wife. Mr. Wu believed the transmissions were successful, but he said his friends never saw them. "Sometimes you can get around censors by rotating the photo," said Mr. Wu, a writer better known by his pen name, Ye Du. "But that doesn't always work." Chinese internet censorship first concentrated on the development of word-screening software to root out politically objectionable content. As a result, internet users over the past couple of years turned to sending photos to evade cyber police. In response, censors upped their game by demonstrating the ability to purge images from group chats and public posts. And in a new report, researchers from the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab said they observed that WeChat expanded its image censorship to one-to-one chats for the first time, in the wake of Mr. Liu's death on Thursday. Citizen Lab said it is investigating how WeChat is able to filter the images. Since the images are blocked mid-transit, the speed is too fast for human intervention. The rapid blocking suggests an algorithm is at work, Citizen Lab researcher Lotus Ruan said. Though activists said they noticed image censoring over the past year, Ms. Ruan said Citizen Lab didn't detect this kind of targeted, person-to-person image blocking when it was investigating Chinese censorship in the spring. Tencent Holdings Ltd., the Chinese internet company that operates WeChat, didn't respond to requests for comment. Companies are required by law to maintain strict censorship of their platforms, a front-line defense that is augmented by police forces dedicated to internet monitoring. The use of enhanced image filtering comes as Chinese authorities engage in a broader push to step up surveillance by using new data-driven technologies.

Security cameras with facial recognition software are being deployed in Chinese cities to catch jaywalkers and track criminal suspects.

Local governments are rolling out "social credit" systems that catalog the digital lives of its citizens, ranging from their internet history to bill payments.

These new capabilities are closing a gap in censorship that Chinese activists and ordinary internet users have counted on--that the sheer mass of messages was too much for censors to handle. "If you hire a million network police, it still wouldn't be enough to filter 1.4 billion people's messages," said Bao Pu, a Hong Kong-based publisher of political books that are banned on the mainland. "But if you have a machine doing it, it can instantly block everything. It doesn't matter if it's a billion messages or 10 billion." Citizen Lab researchers said an increase in image censoring was noticeable as part of a broader clampdown on messages about Mr. Liu. Citizen Lab researchers said they documented 19 images blocked in one-to-one chats, including a cartoon of an empty chair, in addition to images blocked in group chats. Mr. Liu was famously represented by an empty chair at the 2010 ceremony where he was awarded his Nobel Peace Prize. In tests conducted by The Wall Street Journal, some images of Mr. Liu were blocked in private WeChat messages, including a widely circulated one of him and his wife and another one overlaid with information about a vigil in Hong Kong. Some other photos transmitted successfully. Activists said that they have noticed more frequent image blocks on WeChat over the past year and that there are signs the censorship is automated: one image will be blocked while a similar one in a different color scheme will go through. Citizen Lab researcher Jeffrey Knockel said slight changes to an image or its metadata allow it to slip through the filter, while other modified pictures get blocked. That suggests WeChat is filtering based on certain data, or "hash," of the image, Mr. Knockel said. Alyssa Abkowitz contributed to this article.

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From: Savant7/29/2017 12:20:31 PM
   of 1171
 

Nanotechnology...Nanomachines headed for your blood stream...

"But last year, Professor Jeremy Baumberg and colleagues in Cambridge and the University of Bath developed the world's tiniest engine – just a few billionths of a metre in size. It's biocompatible, cost-effective to manufacture, fast to respond and energy efficient.

The forces exerted by these 'ANTs' (for 'actuating nano-transducers') are nearly a hundred times larger than those for any known device, motor or muscle. To make them, tiny charged particles of gold, bound together with a temperature-responsive polymer gel, are heated with a laser. As the polymer coatings expel water from the gel and collapse, a large amount of elastic energy is stored in a fraction of a second. On cooling, the particles spring apart and release energy.

The researchers hope to use this ability of ANTs to produce very large forces relative to their weight to develop three-dimensional machines that swim, have pumps that take on fluid to sense the environment and are small enough to move around our bloodstream.

Working with Cambridge Enterprise, the University's commercialisation arm, the team in Cambridge's Nanophotonics Centre hopes to commercialise the technology for microfluidics bio-applications. The work is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the European Research Council"





How to train your drugs: from nanotherapeutics to nanobots

June 26, 2017


Artist's impression of a nanobot. Credit: Yu JiNanotechnology is creating new opportunities for fighting disease – from delivering drugs in smart packaging to nanobots powered by the world's tiniest engines.

Chemotherapy benefits a great many patients but the side effects can be brutal.

When a patient is injected with an anti-cancer drug, the idea is that the molecules will seek out and destroy rogue tumour cells. However, relatively large amounts need to be administered to reach the target in high enough concentrations to be effective. As a result of this high drug concentration, healthy cells may be killed as well as cancer cells, leaving many patients weak, nauseated and vulnerable to infection.

One way that researchers are attempting to improve the safety and efficacy of drugs is to use a relatively new area of research known as nanothrapeutics to target drug delivery just to the cells that need it.

Professor Sir Mark Welland is Head of the Electrical Engineering Division at Cambridge. In recent years, his research has focused on nanotherapeutics, working in collaboration with clinicians and industry to develop better, safer drugs. He and his colleagues don't design new drugs; instead, they design and build smart packaging for existing drugs.

Nanotherapeutics come in many different configurations, but the easiest way to think about them is as small, benign particles filled with a drug. They can be injected in the same way as a normal drug, and are carried through the bloodstream to the target organ, tissue or cell. At this point, a change in the local environment, such as pH, or the use of light or ultrasound, causes the nanoparticles to release their cargo.

Nano-sized tools are increasingly being looked at for diagnosis, drug delivery and therapy. "There are a huge number of possibilities right now, and probably more to come, which is why there's been so much interest," says Welland. Using clever chemistry and engineering at the nanoscale, drugs can be 'taught' to behave like a Trojan horse, or to hold their fire until just the right moment, or to recognise the target they're looking for.

"We always try to use techniques that can be scaled up – we avoid using expensive chemistries or expensive equipment, and we've been reasonably successful in that," he adds. "By keeping costs down and using scalable techniques, we've got a far better chance of making a successful treatment for patients."

In 2014, he and collaborators demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be used to 'smuggle' chemotherapy drugs into cancer cells in glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer in adults, which is notoriously difficult to treat. The team engineered nanostructures containing gold and cisplatin, a conventional chemotherapy drug. A coating on the particles made them attracted to tumour cells from glioblastoma patients, so that the nanostructures bound and were absorbed into the cancer cells.

Once inside, these nanostructures were exposed to radiotherapy. This caused the gold to release electrons that damaged the cancer cell's DNA and its overall structure, enhancing the impact of the chemotherapy drug. The process was so effective that 20 days later, the cell culture showed no evidence of any revival, suggesting that the tumour cells had been destroyed.

While the technique is still several years away from use in humans, tests have begun in mice. Welland's group is working with MedImmune, the biologics R&D arm of pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, to study the stability of drugs and to design ways to deliver them more effectively using nanotechnology.

"One of the great advantages of working with MedImmune is they understand precisely what the requirements are for a drug to be approved. We would shut down lines of research where we thought it was never going to get to the point of approval by the regulators," says Welland. "It's important to be pragmatic about it so that only the approaches with the best chance of working in patients are taken forward."

Video:
https://phys.org/news/2017-06-drugs-nanotherapeutics-nanobots.html
Credit: University of CambridgeThe researchers are also targeting diseases like tuberculosis (TB). With funding from the Rosetrees Trust, Welland and postdoctoral researcher Dr Íris da luz Batalha are working with Professor Andres Floto in the Department of Medicine to improve the efficacy of TB drugs.

Their solution has been to design and develop nontoxic, biodegradable polymers that can be 'fused' with TB drug molecules. As polymer molecules have a long, chain-like shape, drugs can be attached along the length of the polymer backbone, meaning that very large amounts of the drug can be loaded onto each polymer molecule. The polymers are stable in the bloodstream and release the drugs they carry when they reach the target cell. Inside the cell, the pH drops, which causes the polymer to release the drug.

In fact, the polymers worked so well for TB drugs that another of Welland's postdoctoral researchers, Dr Myriam Ouberaï, has formed a start-up company, Spirea, which is raising funding to develop the polymers for use with oncology drugs. Ouberaï is hoping to establish a collaboration with a pharma company in the next two years.

"Designing these particles, loading them with drugs and making them clever so that they release their cargo in a controlled and precise way: it's quite a technical challenge," adds Welland. "The main reason I'm interested in the challenge is I want to see something working in the clinic – I want to see something working in patients."

Could nanotechnology move beyond therapeutics to a time when nanomachines keep us healthy by patrolling, monitoring and repairing the body?

Nanomachines have long been a dream of scientists and public alike. But working out how to make them move has meant they've remained in the realm of science fiction.

But last year, Professor Jeremy Baumberg and colleagues in Cambridge and the University of Bath developed the world's tiniest engine – just a few billionths of a metre in size. It's biocompatible, cost-effective to manufacture, fast to respond and energy efficient.

The forces exerted by these 'ANTs' (for 'actuating nano-transducers') are nearly a hundred times larger than those for any known device, motor or muscle. To make them, tiny charged particles of gold, bound together with a temperature-responsive polymer gel, are heated with a laser. As the polymer coatings expel water from the gel and collapse, a large amount of elastic energy is stored in a fraction of a second. On cooling, the particles spring apart and release energy.

The researchers hope to use this ability of ANTs to produce very large forces relative to their weight to develop three-dimensional machines that swim, have pumps that take on fluid to sense the environment and are small enough to move around our bloodstream.

Working with Cambridge Enterprise, the University's commercialisation arm, the team in Cambridge's Nanophotonics Centre hopes to commercialise the technology for microfluidics bio-applications. The work is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the European Research Council.

"There's a revolution happening in personalised healthcare, and for that we need sensors not just on the outside but on the inside," explains Baumberg, who leads an interdisciplinary Strategic Research Network and Doctoral Training Centre focused on nanoscience and nanotechnology.

"Nanoscience is driving this. We are now building technology that allows us to even imagine these futures."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-drugs-nanotherapeutics-nanobots.html#jCp

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From: Savant7/31/2017 1:14:04 PM
   of 1171
 
Again...Beware the Electronic Spark>>> *It's all about govt. control....

Doug Casey on the Past and into the Future

secure.caseyresearch.com

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From: Savant8/5/2017 6:38:38 PM
   of 1171
 
genetics>>> The Age of Remodeled Humanoids...Is Upon US>>>>
popularmechanics.com


Scientists Edit Genes of 167 Embryos, the First Such Procedure on Humans in the U.S.The first CRISPR-Cas9 trial on embryos in the United States was by far the biggest trial with the gene-editing tool to edit humans.

The era of CRISPR for humans has begun.

Last week, genetic biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov and a team of researchers at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) successfully edited the genes of 167 human embryos using the medical tool CRISPR-Cas9. According to a report of the study published today in Nature, they targeted a gene in the embryos called MYBPC3 to remove a mutation that can cause a common hereditary heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which can result in fatal cardiac arrest even in young people and athl



The procedure was conducted on embryos created in the lab for the purpose of testing the CRISPR-Cas9 treatment. The researchers said the method was more successful than anticipated, and that using CRISPR-Cas9 to remove the target mutation should be considered for clinical trials—which would mean implanting the embryos into a mother's womb so the child is born with the genetic alterations.

"With this particular mutation, we've already done the groundwork, so we're probably much closer to clinical applications," Mitalipov said during a press call, according to MIT Technology Review. "Clinical trials would mean actually implanting some of these embryos with the goal of establishing pregnancy and monitoring births of children and hopefully following up with children."




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CRISPR stands for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. These are segments of DNA and RNA that work with the Cas9 protein to delete and sometimes replace parts of an organism's genome. The process works in three steps. First a segment of RNA is coded with instructions to locate a specific part of the genome by copying that genetic sequence. Then the Cas9 enzyme cuts out that part of the genetic code. As an optional third step, a new DNA segment can be inserted to replace the deleted part of the genome.









In the case of the recent trial at Oregon Health and Science University, researchers deleted a part of the genome that causes a mutation that can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and filled the gap with a healthy strand of DNA. The embryos were created from eggs donated by healthy women, which were artificially inseminated with sperm from males carrying the mutation. While Chinese researchers have conducted three CRISPR trials on human embryos, the OHSU study was by far the largest procedure with the most embryos modified.

The procedure was most effective when CRISPR-Cas9 was injected into the eggs along with the sperm rather than immediately after. In this case, 42 out of the 58 edited embryos were free of the mutation that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Under normal circumstances, 50 percent of eggs fertilized by a father carrying the cardiomyopathy mutation will also carry the genetic flaw. Using CRISPR improved that ratio so only about 28 percent received the mutation, and 72 percent became healthy embryos.

However, the 16 embryos that did not become free of the mutation experienced unintended genetic deletions or insertions. This margin of error shows that the CRISPR-Cas9 tool is not perfect, and improvements are still needed.

Proponents of this procedure point out that fathers who carry the mutation can take advantage of such treatments to completely delete the dangerous genetic flaw from the family lineage. Opponents argue that parents can already used established medical processes, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and genetic scans, to fertilize eggs in the lab and only implant healthy eggs back into the mother's womb. However, the team that conducted the recent study argues that CRISPR can be used to augment this process and increase the probability of pregnancy.

More importantly, CRISPR-Cas9 has the potential to prevent a myriad of diseases and conditions beyond hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which affects about 1 in 500 people. Gene editing procedures could also treat patients with sickle cell anemia, HIV, and multiple types of cancers including leukemia and breast cancer. Treating these conditions at an early age, or even before the patient is born, could also result in huge cost savings for the medical industry—the ultimate preventative care.

But there is no shortage of concerns regarding genome editing. Some opponents argue the unforeseen effects present a real danger in these types of procedures, and others worry that disease treatment with gene editing is the first step toward a future of so-called "designer babies."

The regulation of future CRISPR research in the United States remains unclear as well. While genome editing studies are permitted in specific circumstances, such as the OHSU study, clinical trials are still forbade by Congress. In addition, the National Institutes of Health does not fund research on human embryos, which is where CRISPR is most effective at preventing disease. Given these barriers, it is possible U.S. researchers look to other countries to continue their work.

"There is a long road ahead, particularly if you want to do this study in a regulated way," said Mitalipov. "It's unclear at this point when we would be able to move on. We would be supportive to moving this technology to other countries."

Doctors and medical researchers have demonstrated that genome modification can be highly effective at treating and preventing otherwise lethal and permanent human diseases. CRISPR will almost certainly become more commonly used in the future, as institutions around the world prepare to conduct studies of their own. Whether CRISPR is a miracle procedure, humanity's tool to ensuring good health, or if it could cause unforeseen physical and societal consequences, is yet to be seen.

Source: MIT Technology Review

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From: Savant8/7/2017 4:16:57 PM
   of 1171
 

It's dynamite...TNT Tissue NanoTransfection

A new device developed at The Ohio State University can start healing organs in a "fraction of a second," researchers say.

The technology, known as Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), has the potential to save the lives of car crash victims and even deployed soldiers injured on site. It's a dime-sized silicone chip that "injects genetic code into skin cells, turning those skin cells into other types of cells required for treating diseased conditions," according to a release.

In lab tests, one touch of TNT completely repaired injured legs of mice over three weeks by turning skin cells into vascular cells.

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From: Savant8/16/2017 9:38:00 PM
   of 1171
 

Alternate Fuels/Biofuel/ recycled Fatbergs>>>


*A better solution would be to somehow capture the fats and oils before they hit the sewers...Recycling R US
As a kid, we saved the cooking grease in a metal coffee can...for use later, or put it into the garbage can
By Y10K, they'll HAVE to recycle it...or else!




http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/fatbergs-fat-cities-sewers-wet-wipes-science/





snip>>
In the United States, many cities eventually required restaurants and other food sellers to have grease traps and to clean them out, and a surprising amount of controversy and intrigue has grown around these caches of fat. In some places, thieves blowtorch their way into grease traps to steal used cooking oil that can be made into biofuels.
---
Yum>>>
In China, fat from sewers and traps is illicitly scooped, cleaned up—though not well—and sold on the black market as “ gutter oil.” In cheap restaurants and street stalls, your dinner might even be cooked in gutter oil.
----
Some cities are even looking at fatbergs as legitimate fuel. After all, fat is high in calories and therefore energy. Thames Water has partnered with a renewable-fuel company to dig fatbergs out of sewers and turn them into biodiesel.
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