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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (406)12/4/2011 7:47:11 PM
From: Urlman
   of 451
 
If I were Kodak, I would bet the farm on Lytro.
engadget.com 

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (406)12/6/2011 12:27:31 AM
From: Stoctrash
   of 451
 
It's so depressing.....still still Still imploding.
...sad in a way.

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To: DRBES who wrote ( 181)9/27/2000 10:26:01 PMFrom: Stoctrash Read Replies (2) of 407 I know....it's not cool when a stock makes a 7+ year low and then you have to deal with the fact a turn in performance is a ways out. They could have been such a powerhouse in digital imaging...and they blew it.
ng...

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To: Stoctrash who wrote (408)12/15/2011 11:59:05 PM
From: nicmar
   of 451
 
I agree. 83 cents today and investors are still afraid to lay any money on the line as I'm seeing predictions of a bottom at a quarter or so. Do you have a short and long term target? tia. .. nic

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From: nicmar12/17/2011 12:59:39 PM
   of 451
 
Kodak Leverages Innovative Imaging Science to Create New KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Papers New Papers Enhance Printing Capabilities for Professional Labs
Press Release: Eastman Kodak Company – Wed, Dec 14, 2011 6:00 AM EST

ROCHESTER, N.Y. , Dec. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK - News) today announced a new family of silver halide-based media, KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Paper and KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Metallic Paper, which leverages advanced breakthroughs in Kodak imaging science research. This media yields a new cyan dispersion and enhanced emulsion technology and as a result, offer benefits for both portrait and commercial labs. Benefits include a larger color gamut with the capacity for more saturated color, while at the same time maintaining accurate skin tone reproduction, highlights and shadow detail.

"We're very excited every time our imaging science group develops an innovation that benefits so many of our customers," said Dennis Olbrich , General Manager, Film, Paper and Output Systems, and Vice President, Film, Photofinishing and Entertainment Group, Eastman Kodak Company. "Early testing among both portrait and commercial labs indicate that KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier and Premier Metallic Papers surpass our exacting demands and are high-quality media that outperform our previous offerings and truly enhance our customers' printing abilities."

The wider color gamut together with the capacity for more saturated color and accurate skin tone reproduction, highlights and shadow detail were traditionally not feasible in a single paper. These key attributes of the new media, which elevate the entire ENDURA media portfolio, allow users more latitude in the final look of their prints without forcing these traditional either/or choices. The creativity remains in the hands of professional photographers and the professional labs that serve them. Operationally, the new papers offer more efficient workflow capabilities, including improved post-process finishing. Backed by Kodak's manufacturing excellence, consistency from roll to roll and batch to batch help minimize process variability.

KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Paper

For portrait labs, KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Paper provides unique benefits by maintaining natural-looking skin tones, from highlights to shadows, while expanding color gamut, enabled by a technological breakthrough, the latest advancement in coupler technology. This innovation also provides a lighter/brighter D-Min for cleaner-looking whites, and at the same time a higher D-Max capability for bold rich blacks, better contrast and exceptional performance in typical home display.

"One of the reasons we've considered Kodak a valuable partner for so many years is the ongoing commitment to continually innovate its silver halide-based products," said Don Burrell , President of Burrell Photo, based in Crown Point, Indiana . "With the new ENDURA Premier Paper, we get prints that just jump off the page, allowing us to deliver even better quality to our customers. At the same time, the paper drops seamlessly into our current workflow, making the conversion to the new paper extremely simple. This ongoing innovation from Kodak is invaluable, both in our business and in the quality and value we in turn bring to our customers."

"After converting to Kodak's New ENDURA Premier Paper, we instantly noticed blacker blacks and improved color gamut giving brighter greens, blues, yellows and cyans," said John Temby , Operations Manager for H. Tempest, Europe 's largest photographic schools printer. "We have also noticed lighter whites that give a fresh feel to our prints. These changes have been achieved while maintaining a very pleasing accurate skin-tone reproduction, which is particularly important for schools photography. Our printing workflow was smoothly converted to the new paper which has given consistently good results ever since. It is good to see Kodak investing in new photographic technology that has further enhanced our production quality."

Commercial labs will benefit from the new paper due to its high D-Max capability for bold, rich blacks, and increased color gamut for strong, vibrant colors (greens, blues, yellows and cyans), crucial in commercial prints. Improved whites that are lighter in density and clean, sharp text and graphic reproduction combine to deliver state-of-the-art image stability.

finance.yahoo.com 

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To: nicmar who wrote (410)12/17/2011 1:01:45 PM
From: nicmar
   of 451
 
Would love to take a shot at this company at 80 cents, but the economy? mo.. nic

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From: Glenn Petersen12/18/2011 9:46:13 PM
   of 451
 
Kodak's financing plans faces obstacles: report

NEW YORK | Sun Dec 18, 2011 8:43pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Hedge funds that have been in discussions with Eastman Kodak Co ( EK.N) to help shore up the company's cash position, have cut the amount they are willing to finance, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

The 131-year old company has been in talks for new financing with a consortium of hedge funds including Cerberus Capital Management LP and Highbridge Capital Management LLC, the report said.

While discussions originally centered on a package of about $900 million, the hedge funds recently cut the amount they are willing to provide to somewhere between $600 million and $700 million, the WSJ said, citing people familiar with the matter.

The report said that might not be enough to meet the company's needs.

Kodak has been trying to sell is portfolio of 1,100 digital patents since August with the help of investment bank Lazard Ltd ( LAZ.N).

While the company is looking at other means of raising cash, unless Kodak closes on the patent sale or gets a large enough amount of bridge financing in coming weeks, it could seek bankruptcy protection during the first few months of next year, the report said.

Kodak had $862 million in cash at the end of September, down from $1.4 billion a year earlier.

(Reporting By Nadia Damouni; Editing by Matt Driskill)

reuters.com 

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (412)12/18/2011 10:25:28 PM
From: nicmar
   of 451
 
Good post. But where do you think EK is going? $.025 or $0.80 up? mo.. nic

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To: nicmar who wrote (413)12/19/2011 11:00:51 AM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 451
 
I don't have a clue. The outcome is probably dependent on the ability of the current management group to adapt. On that basis, the outlook is not positive.

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From: Glenn Petersen12/23/2011 10:03:48 AM
   of 451
 
Kodak Reshuffles Decks

By DANA MATTIOLI and DREW FITZGERALD
Wall Street Journal
December 23, 2011

Eastman Kodak Co. reshuffled its decks Thursday, promoting its general counsel to president and selling off a 194-year-old business that made gelatin.

The moves appeared to be a welcome boost for Kodak shares, which moved 20% higher in after-hours trading.

But they also highlighted the straits at the Rochester, N.Y.-based company, as it races to find fresh financing amid a steep decline in the value of its stock and bonds.

One key path for 131-year-old Kodak is selling off its portfolio of intellectual property, which might bring in hundreds of millions of dollars to invest in Kodak's product lines, which are largely printers.

Late Thursday, Kodak said it was promoting general counsel Laura Quatela to president. Ms. Quatela, who joined Kodak in 1999, has been responsible for monetizing Kodak's intellectual property since 2008.

The 54-year-old Ms. Quatela will begin serving as president alongside current president Phil Faraci, who has been in the role since 2007. Both will report to Chief Executive Antonio Perez.

Ms. Quatela's role in the company has grown as Kodak's fortunes declined. The same year she became head of intellectual property, Kodak created a goal to generate between $250 million and $350 million a year in patent licensing.

Under Ms. Quatela's leadership, Kodak struck a $550 million licensing deal with Samsung Electronics Co. and a $400 million deal with LG Electronics Inc., as well as a number of other deals that have been a big factor in keeping the company afloat.

Since August, her role has become even more vital as Kodak began an effort to sell 1,100 of its digital patents. Ms. Quatela has appeared alongside Mr. Perez in company town halls, updating employees about Kodak's patent sale efforts.

The company and its restructuring advisers have been aggressively looking to shed assets.

Kodak said it was selling off its Eastman Gelatine Corp. business to Rousselot, part of Vion Food Group for an undisclosed sum.

The Kodak subsidiary dates back to 1817 and makes gelatin for printing, imaging, food and pharmaceutical purposes
. Kodak bought the company, at one time named The American Glue Company, in 1930 when its film business was thriving. As film sales started to wane, the company branched out more aggressively into other areas like food and pharmaceuticals.

The sale also includes a 575,000-square-foot production facility in Peabody, Mass., where the company makes gelatin made from cattle bones.

Kodak warned last month that if it isn't able to close on a patent deal or raise rescue financing over the next 12 months it may not be able to remain in business.

Write toDana Mattioli at dana.mattioli@wsj.com and Drew FitzGerald at andrew.fitzgerald@dowjones.com

online.wsj.com 

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From: Glenn Petersen1/4/2012 2:04:32 PM
1 Recommendation   of 451
 
The WSJ is reporting the breaking news that, "Kodak is preparing for a Chapter 11 bankruptcy-protection filing in the coming weeks should efforts to sell a trove of digital patents fail."

Edit - The actual story:

online.wsj.com 

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