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To: E_K_S who wrote (60075)4/5/2004 6:34:12 PM
From: cfimx
   of 64864
 
the guy is PURE salesman...

and no my first name is not ANDY:

LATEST NEWS
8:41 AM PDT Monday
Sun's moves not enough says analyst
Robert Mullins
Sun Microsystem Inc.'s attempts to right itself fail to impress one key industry analyst.

Andrew Neff, of Bear Stearns, on Monday said he is sticking with his "underperform" rating for Sun, of Santa Clara, in the wake of its settlement of a long-standing lawsuit against Microsoft Corp., and the announced reduction of its workforce by 3,300 positions to approach profitability.

"While we're encouraged by Sun's restructuring moves to reduce its cost burden ... its actions today don't address the heart of the issue," Mr. Neff states in a research note to investors. "That is, Sun's growth challenges and margin pressures from growing encroachment of lower-cost solutions.

Sun makes servers and high-end computer workstations used by businesses and other large enterprises. But it is being undercut by less expensive models from such companies as Hewlett-Packard Co., of Palo Alto, and Dell Inc., of Round Rock, Texas.

While Sun's announced workforce reduction of 9 percent, or 3,300 positions, will help bring costs more in line with revenue, Sun will continue to have problems, Mr. Neff states.

"Sun's actions remind us of Compaq/Digital in their later days, [with] serial restructurings but no material changes in the company's fundamental model. If history is a guide, Sun could follow the path of those companies with further disappointments leading to an eventual acquisition," he writes.

Digital Equipment Co. was acquired by Compaq Computer Co., which was later acquired by HP.

Sun last Friday also announced a $1.9 billion settlement with Microsoft, of Redmond, Wash., of a long-standing suit over Sun's allegations that Microsoft unfairly blocked programs written in Sun's Java programing language from the Windows operating system.

Bear Stearns is lowering its Sun estimates for the quarter ended March 30 to a loss of 7 cents a share on revenue of $2.65 billion, versus its previous estimate of a loss of only 1 cent on revenue of $2.97 billion.

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To: im a survivor who wrote (60071)4/5/2004 6:56:35 PM
From: Robert
   of 64864
 
You are better off kepping with the current plan. Look
at it from the perspective of the employer, who obviously
has had the benefit of expensive actuaries and accountants:

1) No employer would voluntarily offer you something better
than what you have as it would cost them more overall.
2) The new plan is worst for the "average" employee. Unless
you know for sure that you are not "average" (ie you
intend or know for sure to die prematurely) it is not
worth it.

Hope this helps.

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To: cfimx who wrote (60076)4/5/2004 7:26:33 PM
From: cfimx
   of 64864
 
The Register » Software »
Sun's Java prince refuses Redmond relocation
By Ashlee Vance in Chicago
Published Monday 5th April 2004 01:32 GMT
Exclusive The first major fallout from Sun's capitulation to Microsoft has occurred with vice president and Java defender Rich Green quitting Sun in "disgust," The Register has confirmed.

Green, Sun's vice president of developer platforms and the major public voice for Java, left the company on the same day that Sun announced it had declined to pursue lawsuits against Microsoft, according to sources. During the US Microsoft antitrust trial, Green was one of Sun's key witnesses, arguing that Microsoft tried to undermine Java by shipping an incompatible version of the JVM (Java Virtual Machine).

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To: E_K_S who wrote (60075)4/5/2004 8:20:55 PM
From: QwikSand
   of 64864
 
Oh man, a McKinsey consultant. Miséricorde. I thought his schmooze veneer was a bit too slick...guess that impression was right. That's more than a little scary.

Rich Green's resignation in disgust may be an indication that JDS and co. are in trouble. It's too bad. During the Jackson DOJ/MSFT trial he did a fine job as an advocate for Sun under cross examination by MSFT's lawyers.

--QS

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To: cfimx who wrote (60078)4/5/2004 8:37:04 PM
From: High-Tech East
   of 64864
 
Hi twister/Mike/room222 and all you other old friends.

We are 18 months in Happy Valley, and just started teaching a course I developed in personal investing. My biggest examples of success and failure are SUNW and Abiomed ... but you knew that already Mike, didn't you? My new effort is called "Progressive Investing Strategies." One of my students wants to add Seminar to the end so it will be PISS ... <g>

Life is good ... we love it here!

You might look at Laserscope [LSCP] that I started buying last September, and have traded in and out 8 times for excellent gains - it is a double for me now.

I am flat on LSCP right now having sold at 24.75 recently. My next buy-in point is around 22. It closed today at 25.59. It is thinly traded, but a great medical device technology story.

The only thing that bothers me about them, and it may become a serious issue, is that they will lose 50% of their net income if they are forced to expense employee stock options. That could be very ugly. That is becoming an important part of due diligence. Some people believe that the FASB will make their recommendation soon.

I hope you are all happy and healthy.

Ken Wilson

edit ... just updated my profile

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To: High-Tech East who wrote (60080)4/5/2004 9:29:44 PM
From: Steve Dietrich
   of 64864
 
Hi Ken,

do you have a take on the macro-economy these days?

Steve Dietrich

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To: Steve Dietrich who wrote (60081)4/5/2004 10:24:07 PM
From: High-Tech East
   of 64864
 
<<do you have a take on the macro-economy these days?>>

Obviously, Steve, the economy is improving, although very slowly.

My view overall, which is based purely on my interpretation of what I read, and nothing more ... is that before things get significantly better, they will get worse, probably much worse. My time-frame ... between August, 2004 and March, 2005, the realities will be common public knowledge. And it will be ugly.

Huge macro-economic imbalances, most definitely, will return to the norm. That means that debt, as a percent of GDP, will return to the norm and interest rates will also return to the norm. What else? --- net foreign US investment, which is hugely negative, will also get closer to a balance --- the balance of international trade will do the same --- the dollar has much further to fall (and gold prices to rise). And all of this at pain to Americans and others around the world.

I painted this scenario to a number of the wealthiest people in this region in the last 6 months, and amazingly, they agree with me.

One person in particular, the Chairman and CEO of the largest bank in central Pennsylvania, with 47 branches, responded to my question (regarding the above) as follows.

"David, I said, how to we get out of these imbalances without a major financial and banking crisis in the US?"

"Ken," he said, "I agree with you completely. We can not ... but if you come up with an answer, let me know."

Ken

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To: High-Tech East who wrote (60082)4/5/2004 10:43:36 PM
From: Steve Dietrich
   of 64864
 
Thanks. I've missed your macro economic posts.

Steve Dietrich

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To: im a survivor who wrote (60071)4/6/2004 5:54:16 AM
From: JDN
   of 64864
 
Your "old" plan sounds like a Defined Benefit Plan and the "New" plan sounds like a defined contribution Plan. The Old plan is pretty outmoded today, hardly any company starts one of those today as they can become VERY expensive for the company not only to fund but to manage (actuaries and all). They are pretty much just as their name indicates. In the former it spells out what you get back, in the latter it spells out what they contribute and you get back whatever that earns. I cant advise you as to which is best for you as a lot has to do with YOUR personal comfort level with risk. (the old risk vs reward formula). Just be thankful you have a choice, most dont.
Now as to the investing, I suspect it wont be so hard as you think. Usually in these type of plans they preselect for you a NUMBER of alternative methods to invest your funds not only equities (with various type investments) but also fixed income types. You can often divide you monies between them. At 33 years of age IMHO the vast majority of your wifes investments OUGHT to be in equities, just select a COUPLE good mutual funds. In my wifes case I put 50% of her contribution in Fidelity Blue Chip Growth and 50% in Fidelity Technology. She got screwed for awhile but each month she got to buy more shares at lower cost, now its coming back and she is doing great. This is called DOLLAR COST AVERAGING and usually is successful over a long period of time. jdn

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To: High-Tech East who wrote (60082)4/6/2004 6:00:51 AM
From: JDN
   of 64864
 
Better get a new banker!! As many of you know I am on a Bank Board. The info we get is interest rates will stay low (especially in relation to history) for some time. Also, the various regulatory agencies are all over Banks like a wet blanket making SURE they dont invest in risky alternatives anymore. Bye the way, TIME TO BRAG, our bank is THE ONLY BANK BASED in PALM BEACH COUNTY with a 5 STAR RATING (highest there is). jdn

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